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Theft Act 1968

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Theft Act 1968

1968 CHAPTER 60

An Act to revise the law of England and Wales as to theft and similar or associated offences, and in connection therewith to make provision as to criminal proceedings by one party to a marriage against the other, and to make certain amendments extending beyond England and Wales in the Post Office Act 1953 and other enactments; and for other purposes connected therewith.

[26th July 1968]

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Modifications etc. (not altering text)

C2By Criminal Justice Act 1991 (c. 53, SIF 39:1), s. 101(1), Sch. 12 para. 23; S.I. 1991/2208, art. 2(1), Sch.1 it is provided (14.10.1991) that in relation to any time before the commencement of s. 70 of that 1991 Act (which came into force on 1.10.1992 by S.I. 1992/333, art. 2(2), Sch. 2) references in any enactment amended by that 1991 Act, to youth courts shall be construed as references to juvenile courts.

Commencement Information

I1Act wholly in force at 1.1.1969, see s. 35(1)

Definition of “theft”E+W

1 Basic definition of theft.E+W

(1)A person is guilty of theft if he dishonestly appropriates property belonging to another with the intention of permanently depriving the other of it; and “thief” and “steal” shall be construed accordingly.

(2)It is immaterial whether the appropriation is made with a view to gain, or is made for the thief’s own benefit.

(3)The five following sections of this Act shall have effect as regards the interpretation and operation of this section (and, except as otherwise provided by this Act, shall apply only for purposes of this section).

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Modifications etc. (not altering text)

C3S. 1(1) applied (25.8.2000) by 2000 c. 6, ss. 148(8), 168

2“Dishonestly”E+W

(1)A person’s appropriation of property belonging to another is not to be regarded as dishonest—

(a)if he appropriates the property in the belief that he has in law the right to deprive the other of it, on behalf of himself or of a third person; or

(b)if he appropriates the property in the belief that he would have the other’s consent if the other knew of the appropriation and the circumstances of it; or

(c)(except where the property came to him as trustee or personal representative) if he appropriates the property in the belief that the person to whom the property belongs cannot be discovered by taking reasonable steps.

(2)A person’s appropriation of property belonging to another may be dishonest notwithstanding that he is willing to pay for the property.

3“Appropriates”.E+W

(1)Any assumption by a person of the rights of an owner amounts to an appropriation, and this includes, where he has come by the property (innocently or not) without stealing it, any later assumption of a right to it by keeping or dealing with it as owner.

(2)Where property or a right or interest in property is or purports to be transferred for value to a person acting in good faith, no later assumption by him of rights which he believed himself to be acquiring shall, by reason of any defect in the transferor’s title, amount to theft of the property.

4“Property”.E+W

(1)Property” includes money and all other property, real or personal, including things in action and other intangible property.

(2)A person cannot steal land, or things forming part of land and severed from it by him or by his directions, except in the following cases, that it to say—

(a)when he is a trustee or personal representative, or is authorised by power of attorney, or as liquidator of a company, or otherwise, to sell or dispose of land belonging to another, and he appropriates the land or anything forming part of it by dealing with it in breach of the confidence reposed in him; or

(b)when he is not in possession of the land and appropriates anything forming part of the land by severing it or causing it to be severed, or after it has been severed; or

(c)when, being in possession of the land under a tenancy, he appropriates the whole or part of any fixture or structure let to be used with the land.

  • For purposes of this subsection “land” does not include incorporeal hereditaments; “tenancy” means a tenancy for years or any less period and includes an agreement for such a tenancy, but a person who after the end of a tenancy remains in possession as statutory tenant or otherwise is to be treated as having possession under the tenancy, and “let” shall be construed accordingly.

(3)A person who picks mushrooms growing wild on any land, or who picks flowers, fruit or foliage from a plant growing wild on any land, does not (although not in possession of the land) steal what he picks, unless he does it for reward or for sale or other commercial purpose.

  • For purposes of this subsection “mushroom” includes any fungus, and “plant” includes any shrub or tree.

(4)Wild creatures, tamed or untamed, shall be regarded as property; but a person cannot steal a wild creature not tamed nor ordinarily kept in captivity, or the carcase of any such creature, unless either it has been reduced into possession by or on behalf of another person and possession of it has not since been lost or abandoned, or another person is in course of reducing it into possession.

5“Belonging to another”.E+W

(1)Property shall be regarded as belonging to any person having possession or control of it, or having in it any proprietary right or interest (not being an equitable interest arising only from an agreement to transfer or grant an interest).

(2)Where property is subject to a trust, the persons to whom it belongs shall be regarded as including any person having a right to enforce the trust, and an intention to defeat the trust shall be regarded accordingly as an intention to deprive of the property any person having that right.

(3)Where a person receives property from or on account of another, and is under an obligation to the other to retain and deal with that property or its proceeds in a particular way, the property or proceeds shall be regarded (as against him) as belonging to the other.

(4)Where a person gets property by another’s mistake, and is under an obligation to make restoration (in whole or in part) of the property or its proceeds or of the value thereof, then to the extent of that obligation the property or proceeds shall be regarded (as against him) as belonging to the person entitled to restoration, and an intention not to make restoration shall be regarded accordingly as an intention to deprive that person of the property or proceeds.

(5)Property of a corporation sole shall be regarded as belonging to the corporation notwithstanding a vacancy in the corporation.

6“With the intention of permanently depriving the other of it”.E+W

(1)A person appropriating property belonging to another without meaning the other permanently to lose the thing itself is nevertheless to be regarded as having the intention of permanently depriving the other of it if his intention is to treat the thing as his own to dispose of regardless of the other’s rights; and a borrowing or lending of it may amount to so treating it if, but only if, the borrowing or lending is for a period and in circumstances making it equivalent to an outright taking or disposal.

(2)Without prejudice to the generality of subsection (1) above, where a person, having possession or control (lawfully or not) of property belonging to another, parts with the property under a condition as to its return which he may not be able to perform, this (if done for purposes of his own and without the other’s authority) amounts to treating the property as his own to dispose of regardless of the other’s rights.

Theft, robbery, burglary, etc.E+W

7 Theft.E+W

A person guilty of theft shall on conviction on indictment be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding [F1 seven years].

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Amendments (Textual)

8 Robbery.E+W

(1)A person is guilty of robbery if he steals, and immediately before or at the time of doing so, and in order to do so, he uses force on any person or puts or seeks to put any person in fear of being then and there subjected to force.

(2)A person guilty of robbery, or of an assault with intent to rob, shall on conviction on indictment be liable to imprisonment for life.

9 Burglary.E+W

(1)A person is guilty of burglary if—

(a)he enters any building or part of a building as a trespasser and with intent to commit any such offence as is mentioned in subsection (2) below; or

(b)having entered any building or part of a building as a trespasser he steals or attempts to steal anything in the building or that part of it or inflicts or attempts to inflict on any person therein any grievous bodily harm.

(2)The offences referred to in subsection (1)(a) above are offences of stealing anything in the building or part of a building in question, of inflicting on any person therein any grievous bodily harm F2... therein, and of doing unlawful damage to the building or anything therein.

[F3(3)A person guilty of burglary shall on conviction on indictment be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding—

(a)where the offence was committed in respect of a building or part of a building which is a dwelling, fourteen years;

(b)in any other case, ten years.

(4)References in subsections (1) and (2) above to a building, and the reference in subsection (3) above to a building which is a dwelling, shall apply also to an inhabited vehicle or vessel, and shall apply to any such vehicle or vessel at times when the person having a habitation in it is not there as well as at times when he is.]

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Amendments (Textual)

10 Aggravated burglary.E+W

(1)A person is guilty of aggravated burglary if he commits any burglary and at the time has with him any firearm or imitation firearm, any weapon of offence, or any explosive; and for this purpose—

(a)firearm” includes an airgun or air pistol, and “imitation firearm” means anything which has the appearance of being a firearm, whether capable of being discharged or not; and

(b)weapon of offence” means any article made or adapted for use for causing injury to or incapacitating a person, or intended by the person having it with him for such use; and

(c)explosive” means any article manufactured for the purpose of producing a practical effect by explosion, or intended by the person having it with him for that purpose.

(2)A person guilty of aggravated burglary shall on conviction on indictment be liable to imprisonment for life.

11 Removal of articles from places open to the public.E+W

(1)Subject to subsections (2) and (3) below, where the public have access to a building in order to view the building or part of it, or a collection or part of a collection housed in it, any person who without lawful authority removes from the building or its grounds the whole or part of any article displayed or kept for display to the public in the building or that part of it or in its grounds shall be guilty of an offence.

  • For this purpose “collection” includes a collection got together for a temporary purpose, but references in this section to a collection do not apply to a collection made or exhibited for the purpose of effecting sales or other commercial dealings.

(2)It is immaterial for purposes of subsection (1) above, that the public’s access to a building is limited to a particular period or particular occasion; but where anything removed from a building or its grounds is there otherwise than as forming part of, or being on loan for exhibition with, a collection intended for permanent exhibition to the public, the person removing it does not thereby commit an offence under this section unless he removes it on a day when the public have access to the building as mentioned in subsection (1) above.

(3)A person does not commit an offence under this section if he believes that he has lawful authority for the removal of the thing in question or that he would have it if the person entitled to give it knew of the removal and the circumstances of it.

(4)A person guilty of an offence under this section shall, on conviction on indictment, be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years.

12 Taking motor vehicle or other conveyance without authority.E+W

(1)Subject to subsections (5) and (6) below, a person shall be guilty of an offence if, without having the consent of the owner or other lawful authority, he takes any conveyance for his own or another’s use or, knowing that any conveyance has been taken without such authority, drives it or allows himself to be carried in or on it.

(2)A person guilty of an offence under subsection (1) above shall [F4be liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding level 5 on the standard scale, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months, or to both.]

F5(3). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

(4)If on the trial of an indictment for theft the jury are not satisfied that the accused committed theft, but it is proved that the accused committed an offence under subsection (1) above, the jury may find him guilty of the offence under subsection (1) [F6and if he is found guilty of it, he shall be liable as he would have been liable under subsection (2) above on summary conviction.]

[F7(4A)Proceedings for an offence under subsection (1) above (but not proceedings of a kind falling within subsection (4) above) in relation to a mechanically propelled vehicle—

(a)shall not be commenced after the end of the period of three years beginning with the day on which the offence was committed; but

(b)subject to that, may be commenced at any time within the period of six months beginning with the relevant day.

(4B)In subsection (4A)(b) above “the relevant day” means—

(a)in the case of a prosecution for an offence under subsection (1) above by a public prosecutor, the day on which sufficient evidence to justify the proceedings came to the knowledge of any person responsible for deciding whether to commence any such prosecution;

(b)in the case of a prosecution for an offence under subsection (1) above which is commenced by a person other than a public prosecutor after the discontinuance of a prosecution falling within paragraph (a) above which relates to the same facts, the day on which sufficient evidence to justify the proceedings came to the knowledge of the person who has decided to commence the prosecution or (if later) the discontinuance of the other prosecution;

(c)in the case of any other prosecution for an offence under subsection (1) above, the day on which sufficient evidence to justify the proceedings came to the knowledge of the person who has decided to commence the prosecution.

(4C)For the purposes of subsection (4A)(b) above a certificate of a person responsible for deciding whether to commence a prosecution of a kind mentioned in subsection (4B)(a) above as to the date on which such evidence as is mentioned in the certificate came to the knowledge of any person responsible for deciding whether to commence any such prosecution shall be conclusive evidence of that fact.]

(5)Subsection (1) above shall not apply in relation to pedal cycles; but, subject to subsection (6) below, a person who, without having the consent of the owner or other lawful authority, takes a pedal cycle for his own or another’s use, or rides a pedal cycle knowing it to have been taken without such authority, shall on summary conviction be liable to a fine not exceeding [F8level 3 on the standard scale.]

(6)A person does not commit an offence under this section by anything done in the belief that he has lawful authority to do it or that he would have the owner’s consent if the owner knew of his doing it and the circumstances of it.

(7)For purposes of this section—

(a)conveyance” means any conveyance constructed or adapted for the carriage of a person or persons whether by land, water or air, except that it does not include a conveyance constructed or adapted for use only under the control of a person not carried in or on it, and “drive” shall be construed accordingly; and

(b)owner”, in relation to a conveyance which is the subject of a hiring agreement or hire-purchase agreement, means the person in possession of the conveyance under that agreement.

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Amendments (Textual)

[F912A Aggravated vehicle-taking.E+W

(1)Subject to subsection (3) below, a person is guilty of aggravated taking of a vehicle if—

(a)he commits an offence under section 12(1) above (in this section referred to as a “basic offence”) in relation to a mechanically propelled vehicle; and

(b)it is proved that, at any time after the vehicle was unlawfully taken (whether by him or another) and before it was recovered, the vehicle was driven, or injury or damage was caused, in one or more of the circumstances set out in paragraphs (a) to (d) of subsection (2) below.

(2)The circumstances referred to in subsection (1)(b) above are—

(a)that the vehicle was driven dangerously on a road or other public place;

(b)that, owing to the driving of the vehicle, an accident occurred by which injury was caused to any person;

(c)that, owing to the driving of the vehicle, an accident occurred by which damage was caused to any property, other than the vehicle;

(d)that damage was caused to the vehicle.

(3)A person is not guilty of an offence under this section if he proves that, as regards any such proven driving, injury or damage as is referred to in subsection (1)(b) above, either—

(a)the driving, accident or damage referred to in subsection (2) above occurred before he committed the basic offence; or

(b)he was neither in nor on nor in the immediate vicinity of the vehicle when that driving, accident or damage occurred.

(4)A person guilty of an offence under this section shall be liable on conviction on indictment to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years or, if it is proved that, in circumstances falling within subsection (2)(b) above, the accident caused the death of the person concerned, [F10fourteen years]F10.

(5)If a person who is charged with an offence under this section is found not guilty of that offence but it is proved that he committed a basic offence, he may be convicted of the basic offence.

(6)If by virtue of subsection (5) above a person is convicted of a basic offence before the Crown Court, that court shall have the same powers and duties as a magistrates’ court would have had on convicting him of such an offence.

(7)For the purposes of this section a vehicle is driven dangerously if—

(a)it is driven in a way which falls far below what would be expected of a competent and careful driver; and

(b)it would be obvious to a competent and careful driver that driving the vehicle in that way would be dangerous.

(8)For the purposes of this section a vehicle is recovered when it is restored to its owner or to other lawful possession or custody; and in this subsection “owner” has the same meaning as in section 12 above.]

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Amendments (Textual)

F9S. 12A inserted (1.4.1992) by Aggravated Vehicle-Taking Act 1992 (c. 11), s. 1(1)(3); S.I. 1992/764, art.2

Modifications etc. (not altering text)

C4S. 12A restricted (1.4.1992) by Aggravated Vehicle-Taking Act 1992 (c. 11), s. 1(3); S.I. 1992/764, art.2

C5S. 12A(4) restricted (1.4.1992) by Aggravated Vehicle-Taking Act 1992 (c. 11), s. 1(2); S.I. 1992/764, art.2

13 Abstracting of electricity.E+W

A person who dishonestly uses without due authority, or dishonestly causes to be wasted or diverted, any electricity shall on conviction on indictment be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years.

14 Extension to thefts from mails outside England and Wales, and robbery etc. on such a theft.E+W

(1)Where a person—

(a)steals or attempts to steal any mail bag or postal packet in the course of transmission as such between places in different jurisdictions in the British postal area, or any of the contents of such a mail bag or postal packet; or

(b)in stealing or with intent to steal any such mail bag or postal packet or any of its contents, commits any robbery, attempted robbery or assault with intent to rob;

then, notwithstanding that he does so outside England and Wales, he shall be guilty of committing or attempting to commit the offence against this Act as if he had done so in England or Wales, and he shall accordingly be liable to be prosecuted, tried and punished in England and Wales without proof that the offence was committed there.

(2)In subsection (1) above the reference to different jurisdictions in the British postal area is to be construed as referring to the several jurisdictions of England and Wales, of Scotland, of Northern Ireland, of the Isle of Man and of the Channel Islands.

(3)F11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Amendments (Textual)

F11S. 14(3) repealed (12.11.2003) by The Postal Services Act 2000 (Consequential Modifications) Order 2003 (S.I. 2003/2908, art. 3(2), Sch. 2

Fraud and blackmailE+W

15 Obtaining property by deception.E+W

F12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Amendments (Textual)

15A Obtaining a money transfer by deception.E+W

F13. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Amendments (Textual)

15B Section 15A: supplementary.E+W

F14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Amendments (Textual)

16 Obtaining pecuniary advantage by deception.E+W

F15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Amendments (Textual)

17 False accounting.E+W

(1)Where a person dishonestly, with a view to gain for himself or another or with intent to cause loss to another,—

(a)destroys, defaces, conceals or falsifies any account or any record or document made or required for any accounting purpose; or

(b)in furnishing information for any purpose produces or makes use of any account, or any such record or document as aforesaid, which to his knowledge is or may be misleading, false or deceptive in a material particular;

he shall, on conviction on indictment, be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding seven years.

(2)For purposes of this section a person who makes or concurs in making in an account or other document an entry which is or may be misleading, false or deceptive in a material particular, or who omits or concurs in omitting a material particular from an account or other document, is to be treated as falsifying the account or document.

18 Liability of company officers for certain offences by company.E+W

(1)Where an offence committed by a body corporate under section F16... 17 of this Act is proved to have been committed with the consent or connivance of any director, manager, secretary or other similar officer of the body corporate, or any person who was purporting to act in any such capacity, he as well as the body corporate shall be guilty of that offence, and shall be liable to be proceeded against and punished accordingly.

(2)Where the affairs of a body corporate are managed by its members, this section shall apply in relation to the acts and defaults of a member in connection with his functions of management as if he were a director of the body corporate.

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Amendments (Textual)

Modifications etc. (not altering text)

19 False statements by company directors, etc.E+W

(1)Where an officer of a body corporate or unincorporated association (or person purporting to act as such), with intent to deceive members or creditors of the body corporate or association about its affairs, publishes or concurs in publishing a written statement or account which to his knowledge is or may be misleading, false or deceptive in a material particular, he shall on conviction on indictment be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding seven years.

(2)For purposes of this section a person who has entered into a security for the benefit of a body corporate or association is to be treated as a creditor of it.

(3)Where the affairs of a body corporate or association are managed by its members, this section shall apply to any statement which a member publishes or concurs in publishing in connection with his functions of management as if he were an officer of the body corporate or association.

20 Suppression, etc. of documents.E+W

(1)A person who dishonestly, with a view to gain for himself or another or with intent to cause loss to another, destroys, defaces or conceals any valuable security, any will or other testamentary document or any original document of or belonging to, or filed or deposited in, any court of justice or any government department shall on conviction on indictment be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding seven years.

(2)F17. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Amendments (Textual)

21 Blackmail.E+W

(1)A person is guilty of blackmail if, with a view to gain for himself or another or with intent to cause loss to another, he makes any unwarranted demand with menaces; and for this purpose a demand with menaces is unwarranted unless the person making it does so in the belief—

(a)that he has reasonable grounds for making the demand; and

(b)that the use of the menaces is a proper means of reinforcing the demand.

(2)The nature of the act or omission demanded is immaterial, and it is also immaterial whether the menaces relate to action to be taken by the person making the demand.

(3)A person guilty of blackmail shall on conviction on indictment be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding fourteen years.

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Modifications etc. (not altering text)

Offences relating to goods stolen etc.E+W

22 Handling stolen goods.E+W

(1)A person handles stolen goods if (otherwise than in the course of the stealing) knowing or believing them to be stolen goods he dishonestly receives the goods, or dishonestly undertakes or assists in their retention, removal, disposal or realisation by or for the benefit of another person, or if he arranges to do so.

(2)A person guilty of handling stolen goods shall on conviction on indictment be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding fourteen years.

23 Advertising rewards for return of goods stolen or lost.E+W

Where any public advertisement of a reward for the return of any goods which have been stolen or lost uses any words to the effect that no questions will be asked, or that the person producing the goods will be safe from apprehension or inquiry, or that any money paid for the purchase of the goods or advanced by way of loan on them will be repaid, the person advertising the reward and any person who prints or publishes the advertisement shall on summary conviction be liable to a fine not exceeding [F18level 3 on the standard scale.]

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Amendments (Textual)

24 Scope of offences relating to stolen goods.E+W

(1)The provisions of this Act relating to goods which have been stolen shall apply whether the stealing occurred in England or Wales or elsewhere, and whether it occurred before or after the commencement of this Act, provided that the stealing (if not an offence under this Act) amounted to an offence where and at the time when the goods were stolen; and references to stolen goods shall be construed accordingly.

(2)For purposes of those provisions references to stolen goods shall include, in addition to the goods originally stolen and parts of them (whether in their original state or not),—

(a)any other goods which directly or indirectly represent or have at any time represented the stolen goods in the hands of the thief as being the proceeds of any disposal or realisation of the whole or part of the goods stolen or of goods so representing the stolen goods; and

(b)any other goods which directly or indirectly represent or have at any time represented the stolen goods in the hands of a handler of the stolen goods or any part of them as being the proceeds of any disposal or realisation of the whole or part of the stolen goods handled by him or of goods so representing them.

(3)But no goods shall be regarded as having continued to be stolen goods after they have been restored to the person from whom they were stolen or to other lawful possession or custody, or after that person and any other person claiming through him have otherwise ceased as regards those goods to have any right to restitution in respect of the theft.

(4)For purposes of the provisions of this Act relating to goods which have been stolen (including subsections (1) to (3) above) goods obtained in England or Wales or elsewhere either by blackmail or [F19, subject to subsection (5) below, by fraud (within the meaning of the Fraud Act 2006)]F19 shall be regarded as stolen; and “steal”, “theft” and “thief” shall be construed accordingly.

[F20(5)Subsection (1) above applies in relation to goods obtained by fraud as if—

(a)the reference to the commencement of this Act were a reference to the commencement of the Fraud Act 2006, and

(b)the reference to an offence under this Act were a reference to an offence under section 1 of that Act.F20]

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Amendments (Textual)

Modifications etc. (not altering text)

C8S. 24(1) and (4) applied (25.8.2000) by 2000 c. 6, ss. 148(9), 168

[F2124A Dishonestly retaining a wrongful credit.E+W

(1)A person is guilty of an offence if—

(a)a wrongful credit has been made to an account kept by him or in respect of which he has any right or interest;

(b)he knows or believes that the credit is wrongful; and

(c)he dishonestly fails to take such steps as are reasonable in the circumstances to secure that the credit is cancelled.

(2)References to a credit are to a credit of an amount of money.

[F22(2A)A credit to an account is wrongful to the extent that it derives from—

(a)theft;

(b)blackmail;

(c)fraud (contrary to section 1 of the Fraud Act 2006); or

(d)stolen goods.]

F22(3)F23. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

(4)F23. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

(5)In determining whether a credit to an account is wrongful, it is immaterial (in particular) whether the account is overdrawn before or after the credit is made.

(6)A person guilty of an offence under this section shall be liable on conviction on indictment to imprisonment for a term not exceeding ten years.

(7)Subsection (8) below applies for purposes of provisions of this Act relating to stolen goods (including [F24subsection (2A)]F24 above).

(8)References to stolen goods include money which is dishonestly withdrawn from an account to which a wrongful credit has been made, but only to the extent that the money derives from the credit.

[F25(9)Account” means an account kept with—

(a)a bank;

(b)a person carrying on a business which falls within subsection (10) below; or

(c)an issuer of electronic money (as defined for the purposes of Part 2 of the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000).

(10)A business falls within this subsection if—

(a)in the course of the business money received by way of deposit is lent to others; or

(b)any other activity of the business is financed, wholly or to any material extent, out of the capital of or the interest on money received by way of deposit.

(11)References in subsection (10) above to a deposit must be read with—

(a)section 22 of the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000;

(b)any relevant order under that section; and

(c)Schedule 2 to that Act;

but any restriction on the meaning of deposit which arises from the identity of the person making it is to be disregarded.

(12)For the purposes of subsection (10) above—

(a)all the activities which a person carries on by way of business shall be regarded as a single business carried on by him; and

(b)money” includes money expressed in a currency other than sterling.F25]]

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Amendments (Textual)

F21S. 24A inserted (18.12.1996) by 1996 c. 62, s. 2

Possession of housebreaking implements, etc.E+W

25 Going equipped for stealing, etc.E+W

(1)A person shall be guilty of an offence if, when not at his place of abode, he has with him any article for use in the course of or in connection with any [F26burglary or theft]F26 .

(2)A person guilty of an offence under this section shall on conviction on indictment be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding three years.

(3)Where a person is charged with an offence under this section, proof that he had with him any article made or adapted for use in committing a [F27burglary or theft]F27 shall be evidence that he had it with him for such use.

(4)F28. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

(5)For purposes of this section an offence under section 12(1) of this Act of taking a conveyance shall be treated as theft F29... .

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Amendments (Textual)

Enforcement and procedureE+W

26 Search for stolen goods.E+W

(1)If it is made to appear by information on oath before a justice of the peace that there is reasonable cause to believe that any person has in his custody or possession or on his premises any stolen goods, the justice may grant a warrant to search for and seize the same; but no warrant to search for stolen goods shall be addressed to a person other than a constable except under the authority of an enactment expressly so providing.

F30(2). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

(3)Where under this section a person is authorised to search premises for stolen goods, he may enter and search the premises accordingly, and may seize any goods he believes to be stolen goods.

F31(4). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

(5)This section is to be construed in accordance with section 24 of this Act; and in subsection (2) above the references to handling stolen goods shall include any corresponding offence committed before the commencement of this act.

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Amendments (Textual)

Modifications etc. (not altering text)

27 Evidence and procedure on charge of theft or handling stolen goods.E+W

(1)Any number of persons may be charged in one indictment, with reference to the same theft, with having at different times or at the same time handled all or any of the stolen goods, and the persons so charged may be tried together.

(2)On the trial of two or more persons indicted for jointly handling any stolen goods the jury may find any of the accused guilty if the jury are satisfied that he handled all or any of the stolen goods, whether or not he did so jointly with the other accused or any of them.

(3)Where a person is being proceeded against for handling stolen goods (but not for any offence other than handling stolen goods), then at any stage of the proceedings, if evidence has been given of his having or arranging to have in his possession the goods the subject of the charge, or of his undertaking or assisting in, or arranging to undertake or assist in, their retention, removal, disposal or realisation, the following evidence shall be admissible for the purpose of proving that he knew or believed the goods to be stolen goods:—

(a)evidence that he has had in his possesion, or has undertaken or assisted in the retention, removal, disposal or realisation of, stolen goods from any theft taking place not earlier than twelve months before the offence charged; and

(b)(provided that seven days’ notice in writing has been given to him of the intention to prove the conviction) evidence that he has within the five years preceding the date of the offence charged been convicted of theft or of handling stolen goods.

(4)In any proceedings for the theft of anything in the course of transmission (whether by post or otherwise), or for handling stolen goods from such a theft, a statutory declaration made by any person that he despatched or received or failed to receive any goods or postal packet, or that any goods or postal packet when despatched or received by him were in a particular state or condition, shall be admissible as evidence of the facts stated in the declaration, subject to the following conditions:—

(a)a statutory declaration shall only be admissible where and to the extent to which oral evidence to the like effect would have been admissible in the proceedings; and

(b)a statutory declaration shall only be admissible if at least seven days before the hearing or trial a copy of it has been given to the person charged, and he has not, at least three days before the hearing or trial or within such further time as the court may in special circumstances allow, given the prosecutor written notice requiring the attendance at the hearing or trial of the person making the declaration.

[F32(4A)Where the proceedings mentioned in subsection (4) above are proceedings before a magistrates’ court inquiring into an offence as examining justices that subsection shall have effect with the omission of the words from “subject to the following conditions” to the end of the subsection.]

(5)This section is to be construed in accordance with section 24 of this Act; and in subsection (3)(b) above the reference to handling stolen goods shall include any corresponding offence committed before the commencement of this Act.

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Amendments (Textual)

F32S. 27(4A) inserted (4.7.1996 but with effect as mentioned in Sch. 1 Pt. III para. 39) by 1996 c. 25, s. 47, Sch. 1 Pt. II para. 19 (with s. 78(1)); S.I. 1997/683, art. 1(2)

Modifications etc. (not altering text)

C10S. 27(4) applied (with modifications) (26.3.2001) by 2000 c. 26, s. 109(2); S.I. 2001/878, art. 2, Sch. (subject to transitional provisions and savings in art. 16)

F3328. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E+W

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Amendments (Textual)

F33S. 28 repealed (25.8.2000) by 2000 c. 6, ss. 165, 168, Sch. 12 Pt. I (with Sch. 11 paras. 1,2)

29 Jurisdiction of quarter sessions, and summary trial.E+W

F34(1). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

X1(2)In Schedule I to the M1 Magistrates’ Courts Act 1952 (which lists the indictable offences by adults which may be tried summarily with the consent of the accused) for paragraph 11 there shall be substituted:—

11Any indictable offence under the Theft Act 1968 except—

(a)

robbery, aggravated burglary, blackmail and assault with intent to rob; and

(b)

burglary comprising the commission of, or an intention to commit, an offence which is not included in this Schedule; and

(c)

burglary in a dwelling if entry to the dwelling or the part of it in which the burglary was committed, or to any building or part of a building containing the dwelling, was obtained by force or deception or by the use of any tool, key or appliance, or if any person in the dwelling was subjected to violence or the threat of violence; and

(d)

handling stolen goods from an offence not committed in the United Kingdom.

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Editorial Information

X1The text of s. 29(2) is in the form in which it was originally enacted: it was not reproduced in Statutes in Force and does not reflect any amendments or repeals which may have been made prior to 1.2.1991.

Amendments (Textual)

Marginal Citations

General and consequential provisionsE+W+S+N.I.

30[F35Spouses and civil partnersF35]E+W
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Amendments (Textual)

(1)This Act shall apply in relation to the parties to a marriage, and to property belonging to the wife or husband whether or not by reason of an interest derived from the marriage, as it would apply if they were not married and any such interest subsisted independently of the marriage.

(2)Subject to subsection (4) below, a person shall have the same right to bring proceedings against that person’s wife or husband for any offence (whether under this Act or otherwise) as if they were not married,and a person bringing any such proceedings shall be competent to give evidence for the prosecution at every stage of the proceedings.

F36(3). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

(4)Proceedings shall not be instituted against a person for any offence of stealing or doing unlawful damage to property which at the time of the offence belongs to that person’s wife or husband, [F37or civil partner]F37 or for any attempt, incitement or conspiracy to commit such an offence,unless the proceedings are instituted by or with the consent of the Director of Public Prosecutions:

Provided that—

(a)this subsection shall not apply to proceedings against a person for an offence—

(i)if that person is charged with committing the offence jointly with the wife or husband [F37or civil partner]F37; F38...

(ii)if by virtue of any judicial decree or order (wherever made) that person and the wife or husband are at the time of the offence under no obligation to cohabit; F39. . .[F40 or

(iii)an order (wherever made) is in force providing for the separation of that person and his or her civil partner.]

F40F41(b). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

(5)F42Notwithstanding [F43section 6 of the Prosecution of Offences Act 1979] subsection (4) of this section shall apply—

(a)to an arrest (if without warrant) made by the wife or husband, [F37or civil partner]F37 and

(b)to a warrant of arrest issued on an information laid by the wife or husband [F37or civil partner]F37 .

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Amendments (Textual)

F38S. 30: word at end of para. (a)(ii) of proviso repealed (5.12.2005) by Civil Partnership Act 2004 (c. 33), ss. 261(1)(4), 263, Sch. 27 para. 27(3), Sch. 30; S.I. 2005/3175, art. 2(2)(6)

F40S. 30: para. (a)(iii) and preceding word in proviso inserted (5.12.2005) by Civil Partnership Act 2004 (c. 33), ss. 261(1), 262, Sch. 27 para. 27(3); S.I. 2005/3175, art. 2(2)

Modifications etc. (not altering text)

31 Effect on civil proceedings and rights.E+W

(1)A person shall not be excused, by reason that to do so may incriminate that person or the [F44spouse or civil partner]F44 of that person of an offence under this Act—

(a)from answering any question put to that person in proceedings for the recovery or administration of any property, for the execution of any trust or for an account of any property or dealings with property; or

(b)from complying with any order made in any such proceedings;

but no statement or admission made by a person in answering a question put or complying with an order made as aforesaid shall, in proceedings for an offence under this Act, be admissible in evidence against that person or (unless they [F45married or became civil partners after the making of the statement or admission) against the spouse or civil partner]F45 of that person.

(2)Notwithstanding any enactment to the contrary, where property has been stolen or obtained by fraud or other wrongful means, the title to that or any other property shall not be affected by reason only of the conviction of the offender.

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Amendments (Textual)

Modifications etc. (not altering text)

32 Effect on existing law and construction of references to offences.E+W

(1)The following offences are hereby abolished for all purposes not relating to offences committed before the commencement of this Act, that is to say—

(a)any offence at common law of larceny, robbery, burglary, receiving stolen property, obtaining property by threats, extortion by colour or office or franchise, false accounting by public officers, concealment of treasure trove and, except as regards offences relating to the public revenue, cheating; and

(b)any offence under an enactment mentioned in Part I of Schedule 3 to this Act, to the extent to which the offence depends on any section or part of a section included in column 3 of that Schedule;

but so that the provisions in Schedule 1 to this Act (which preserve with modifications certain offences under the M2Larcency Act 1861 of taking or killing deer and taking or destroying fish) shall have effect as there set out.

(2)Except as regards offences committed before the commencement of this Act, and except in so far as the context otherwise requires,—

(a)references in any enactment passed before this Act to an offence abolished by this Act shall, subject to any express amendment or repeal made by this Act, have effect as references to the corresponding offence under this Act, and in any such enactment the expression “receive” (when it relates to an offence of receiving) shall mean handle, and “receiver” shall be construed accordingly; and

(b)without prejudice to paragraph (a) above, references in any enactment, whenever passed, to theft or stealing (including references to stolen goods), and references to robbery, blackmail, burglary, aggravated burglary or handling stolen goods, shall be construed in accordance with the provisions of this Act, including those of section 24.

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Marginal Citations

33 Miscellaneous and consequential amendments, and repeal.E+W

X2F46(1). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

X2(2)The enactments mentioned in Parts II and III of Schedule 2 to this Act shall have effect subject to the amendments there provided for, and (subject to subsection (4) below) the amendments made by Part II to enactments extending beyond England and Wales shall have the like extent as the enactment amended.

X2(3)The enactments mentioned in Schedule 3 to this Act (which include in Part II certain enactments related to the subject matter of this Act but already obsolete or redundant apart from this Act) are hereby repealed to the extent specified in column 3 of that Schedule; and, notwithstanding that the foregoing sections of this Act do not extend to Scotland, where any enactment expressed to be repealed by Schedule 3 does so extend, the Schedule shall have effect to repeal it in its application to Scotland except in so far as the repeal is expressed not to extend to Scotland.

(4)No amendment or repeal made by this Act in Schedule 1 to the M3Extradition Act 1870 or in the Schedule to the M4Extradition Act 1873 shall affect the operation of that Schedule by reference to the law of a British possession; but the repeal made in Schedule 1 to the M5Extradition Act 1870 shall extend throughout the United Kingdom.

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Editorial Information

X2The text of s. 33(1)–(3) is in the form in which it was originally enacted: it was not reproduced in Statutes in Force and does not reflect any amendments or repeals which may have been made prior to 1.2.1991.

Amendments (Textual)

F46S. 33(1) repealed (26.3.2001) by S.I. 2001/1149, art. 3(2), Sch. 2 (with art. 4(11))

Marginal Citations

SupplementaryE+W

34 Interpretation.E+W

(1)Sections 4(1) and 5(1) of this Act shall apply generally for purposes of this Act as they apply for purposes of section 1.

(2)For purposes of this Act—

(a)gain” and “loss” are to be construed as extending only to gain or loss in money or other property, but as extending to any such gain or loss whether temporary or permanent; and—

(i)gain” includes a gain by keeping what one has, as well as a gain by getting what one has not; and

(ii)loss” includes a loss by not getting what one might get, as well as a loss by parting with what one has;

(b)goods”, except in so far as the context otherwise requires, includes money and every other description of property except land, and includes things severed from the land by stealing [F47; and.

(c)“mail bag” and “postal packet” have the meanings given by section 125(1) of the Postal Services Act 2000.F47F47]

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Amendments (Textual)

Modifications etc. (not altering text)

35 Commencement and transitional provisions.E+W

(1)This Act shall come into force on the 1st January 1969 and, save as otherwise provided by this Act, shall have effect only in relation to offences wholly or partly committed on or after that date.

(2)[F48Section 27 of this Act and section 148 of the Powers of Criminal Courts (Sentencing) Act 2000]shall apply in relation to proceedings for an offence committed before the commencement of this Act as they would apply in relation to proceedings for a corresponding offence under this Act, and shall so apply in place of any corresponding enactment repealed by this Act.

(3)Subject to subsection (2) above, no repeal or amendment by this Act of any enactment relating to procedure or evidence, or to the jurisdiction or powers of any court, or to the effect of a conviction, shall affect the operation of the enactment in relation to offences committed before the commencement of this Act or to proceedings for any such offence.

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Amendments (Textual)

F48Words in s. 35(2) substituted (25.8.2000) by 2000 c. 6, ss. 165(1), 168, Sch. 9 para. 35

36 Short title, and general provisions as to Scotland and Northern Ireland.E+W

(1)This Act may be cited as the Theft Act 1968.

F49(2). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

(3)This Act does not extend to Scotland or, F50. . . to Northern Ireland, except as regards any amendment or repeal which in accordance with section 33 above is to extend to Scotland or Northern Ireland.

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Amendments (Textual)

SCHEDULES

Section 32.

SCHEDULE 1E+W Offences of Taking, etc. Deer or Fish

F511. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .E+W

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Amendments (Textual)

Taking or destroying fishE+W

2[F52(1)A person who unlawfully takes or destroys, or attempts to take or destroy, any fish in water which is private property or in which there is any private right of fishery shall on summary conviction be liable to a fine not exceeding level 5 on the standard scale.]

F52(2)F53. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

(3)The court by which a person is convicted of an offence under [F54sub-paragraph (1) above]F54 may order the forfeiture of anything which, at the time of the offence, he had with him for use for taking or destroying fish.

[F55Any person may arrest without warrant anyone who is, or whom he, with reasonable cause, suspects to be, committing an offence under sub-paragraph (1) above, and may seize from any person who is, or whom he, with reasonable cause, suspects to be, committing any offence under this paragraph anything which on that person’s conviction of the offence would be liable to be forfeited under sub-paragraph (3) above.F55F55]

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Amendments (Textual)

Modifications etc. (not altering text)

C15Sch. 1 para. 2(1): Criminal Justice Act 1982 (c. 48, SIF 39:1), ss. 35 (in relation to liability on first and subsequent convictions), 38 (increase of fines) and 46 (substitution of references to levels on the standard scale) apply (E.W.)

Section 33(1),(2).

X3SCHEDULE 2E+W+S+N.I. Miscellaneous and Consequential Amendments

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Editorial Information

X3The text of Schedule 2 is in the form in which it was originally enacted: it was not reproduced in Statutes in Force and, except as specified, does not reflect any amendments or repeals which may have been made prior to 1.2.1991.

F56Part IE+W+S+N.I.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Amendments (Textual)

F56Sch. 2 Pt. I repealed (26.3.2001) by S.I. 2001/1149, art. 3(2), Sch. 2 (with art. 4(11))

PART IIE+W+S+N.I. Other amendments extending beyond England and Wales

Act AmendedAmendment
F58. . .F58. . .
The Public Stores Act 1875 (38 & 39 Vict. c. 25)For section 12 (incorporation of parts of Larceny Act 1861) there shall be substituted:—
(1) Any person may arrest without warrant anyone who is, or whom he, with reasonable cause, suspects to be, in the act of committing or attempting to commit an offence against section 5 or 8 of this Act.
(2) If it is made to appear by information on oath before a justice of the peace that there is reasonable cause to believe that any person has in his custody or possession or on his premises any stores in respect of which an offence against section 5 of this Act has been committed, the justice may issue a warrant to a constable to search for and seize the stores as in the case of stolen goods, and the M6 Police (Property) Act 1897 shall apply as if this subsection were among the enactments mentioned in section 1(1) of that Act.
The Army Act 1955 (3 & 4 Eliz. 2. c. 18)For section 44(1)(b) there shall be substituted—
(b) handles any stolen goods, where property stolen was public or service property, or.
For section 45(b) there shall be substituted—
(b) handles any stolen goods, where the property stolen belonged to a person subject to military law, or
In section 138(1) for the words from “receiving” to “stolen” there shall be substituted the words “handling it”.
In section 225(1) after the definition of “Governor” there shall be inserted—
“handles”has the same meaning as in the Theft Act 1968;
and for the definition of steals there shall be substituted—
“steals” has the same meaning as in the Theft Act 1968, and references to stolen goods shall be construed as if contained in that Act.
The Air Force Act 1955 (3 & 4 Eliz. 2. c. 19)The same amendments shall be made in sections 44, 45, 138 and 223 as are above directed to be made in the corresponding sections of the Army Act 1955, except that in the amendment to section 45(b) “air-force law” shall be substituted for “military law”.
The Naval Discipline Act 1957 (5 & 6 Eliz. 2. c. 53)For section 29(b) there shall be substituted—
(b) handles any stolen goods, where the property stolen was public or service property, or.
In section 76(1) for the words from “receiving” to “embezzling” there shall be substituted the word “handling”.
In section 135(1) the same amendments shall be made as are above directed to be made in section 225(1) of the Army Act 1955.
The Army and Air Force Act 1961 (9 & 10 Eliz. 2. c. 52)Section 21 shall be omitted.
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Amendments (Textual)

F58Entry relating to the Extradition Act 1873 repealed by Extradition Act 1989 (c. 33, SIF 48), s. 37, Sch. 2

Marginal Citations

PART IIIE+W Amendments limited to England and Wales

Act AmendedAmendment
F59...F59...
F59...F59...
F60. . .F60. . .
The House to House Collections Act 1939 (2 & 3 Geo. 6. c. 44)In the Schedule (offences for which a conviction is a ground for refusing or revoking a licence under the Act to promote a collection for charity) for the entry relating to the Larceny Act 1916 there shall be substituted:— “Robbery, burglary and blackmail”.
The Magistrates’ Court Act 1952 (15 & 16 Geo. 6. & 1 Eliz. 2. c. 55)In Schedule 1 for paragraph 8 there shall be substituted— “8. Offences under sections 53 and 55 to 58 of the M7 Post Office Act 1953”.
The Visiting Forces Act 1952 (15 & 16 Geo. 6. & 1 Eliz. 2. c. 67)In the Schedule there shall be inserted in paragraph 1(a) after the word “buggery” the word “robbery”, and in paragraph 3 there shall be added at the end— “(g) the Theft Act 1968, except section 8 (robbery)”.
The Finance Act 1965 (1965 c. 25)In Schedule 10, in the Table in paragraph 1, for the words “Sections 500 to 505” there shall be substituted the words “Sections 500 to 504”.
The Finance Act 1966 (1966 c. 18)In Schedule 6, in paragraph 13, for the words “Sections 500 to 505” there shall be substituted the words “Sections 500 to 504”, and the words from “together with” to “the said section 505” shall be omitted.
The Firearms Act 1968 (1968 c. 27)Schedule I (offences in connection with which possession of a firearm is an offence under section 17(2)) shall be amended, except in relation to a person’s apprehension for an offence committed before the commencement of this Act, by substituting for paragraph 4— “4. Theft, burglary, blackmail and any offence under section 12(1) (taking of motor vehicle or other conveyance without owner’s consent) of the Theft Act 1968”: by omitting paragraph 7: and by substituting in paragraph 8 for the words “paragraphs I to 7” the words “paragraphs I to 6”.
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Amendments (Textual)

F59Sch. 2 Pt. III: entry relating to the Gaming Act 1845 repealed (1.9.2007) by Gambling Act 2005 (c. 19), ss. 356(4), 368, Sch. 17; S.I. 2006/3272, art. 2(4) (with savings in art. 4) (with transitional provisions in Sch. 4)

F60Entry relating to the Bankruptcy Act 1914 repealed by Insolvency Act 1985 (c. 65, SIF 66), s. 235, Sch. 9 para. 11, Sch. 10

Marginal Citations

Section 33(3).

X4SCHEDULE 3E+W+S Repeals

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Editorial Information

X4The text of Schedule 3 is in the form in which it was originally enacted: it was not reproduced in Statutes in Force and does not reflect any amendments or repeals which may have been made prior to 1.2.1991.

Part IE+W+S Penal Enactments superseded by this Act

Session and ChapterShort TitleExtent of Repeal
3 Edw. 1.The Statute of Westminster the First.Chapters 26 and 31.
15 Geo. 2. c. 33The Starr and Bent Act 1741.The whole Act.
22 Geo. 2. c. 27The Frauds by Workmen Act 1748.The whole Act.
17 Geo. 3. c. 11The Worsted Act 1776.In section 12 the words from “or shall conceal” to “other purposes”.
17 Geo. 3. c. 56The Frauds by Workmen Act 1777.The Whole Act.
50 Geo. 3. c. 59The Embezzlement by Collectors Act 1810.The Whole Act, so far as unrepealed.
55 Geo. 3. c. 50.The Gaol Fees Abolition Act 1815.The whole Act.
5 Geo. 4. c. 83.The Vagrancy Act 1824.In section 4 the words from “having in his or her custody” to “outbuilding, or,” together with the words “and every such picklock key, crow, jack, bit, and other implement.”
7 Geo. 4. c. 16The Chelsea and Kilmainham Hospitals Act 1826.Section 25.
Section 34 from “and, if any pensioner” onwards, except the words from “such mark, stamp or brand” to “to commissioners”, where next occuring.
Section 38.
2 & 3 Vict. c. 47.The Metropolitan Police Act 1839.Sections 26, 27, 28, 30 and 31.
2 & 3 Vict. c. 71.The Metropolitan Police Courts Act 1839.Section 26.
3 & 4 Vict. c. 50The Canals (Offences) Act 1840.Sections 7 and 8.
3 & 4 Vict. c. 84The Metropolitan Police Courts Act 1840.Section 11.
6 & 7 Vict. c. 40.The Hosiery Act 1843.The whole Act, except sections 18 to 20.
10 & 11 Vict. c. 16The Commissioners Clauses Act 1847.In section 67 the words “exact or”.
24 & 25 Vict. c. 96.The Larceny Act 1861.The whole Act.
24 & 25 Vict. c. 98 The Forgery Act 1861.Section 3.
26 & 27 Vict. c. 103.The Misappropriation by Servants Act 1863.The whole Act.
28 & 29 Vict. c. 124.The Admiralty Powers, &c Act 1865.Sections 6 to 9, together with the words “of all offences specified in this Act, and” in section 5.
32 & 33 Vict. c. 62.The Debtors Act 1869.In section 13, paragraph (1).
33 & 34 Vict. c. 58.The Forgery Act 1870.The whole Act, so far as unrepealed.
34 & 35 Vict. c. 41.The Gas Works Clauses Act 1871.In section 38, as incorporated in the Electric Lighting Act 1882, the words “or fraudulently abstracts, consumes or uses gas of the undertakers”, the words “or for abstracting, consuming or using gas of undertakers” and the words “abstraction or consumption”.
37 & 38 Vict. c. 36.The False Personation Act 1874.The whole Act.
38 & 39 Vict. c. 24.The Falsification of Accounts Act 1875.The whole Act.
38 & 39 Vict. c. 89.The Public Works Loans Act 1875.Section 44.
47 & 48 Vict. c. 55.The Pensions and Yeomanry Pay Act 1884.Section 3.
50 & 51 Vict. c. 55.The Sheriffs Act 1887.In section 29, subsection (2)(b) and in subsection (6) the words from “or demands” to “office”.
50 & 51 Vict. c. 71.The Coroners Act 1887.In section 8(2) the words “of extortion or”.
54 & 55 Vict. c. 36.The Consular Salaries and Fees Act 1891.Section 2(3).
57 & 58 Vict. c. 60.The Merchant Shipping Act 1894.In section 154 paragraph (d), and in paragraph (e) the words “or representation” and the words “or made.”
In section 197(8) paragraph (d).
Section 248.
Section 388(5) from “and if” onwards.
In section 724(4) the words “demands or”.
61 & 62 Vict. c. 57.The Elementary School Teachers (Superannuation) Act 1898.Section 10.
62 & 63 Vict. c. 19.The Electric Lighting (Clauses) Act 1899.In the Schedule, in section 38 of the Gasworks Clauses Act 1871 as set out in the Appendix, the words “or fraudulently abstracts, consumes or uses gas of the undertakers”, the words “or for abstracting, consuming or using gas of undertakers” and the words “abstraction or consumption” (these repeals having effect for the purposes of the Schedule as incorporated with the Electricity Act 1947 or any other enactment).
6 Edw. 7. c. 48.The Merchant Shipping Act 1906.Section 28(10) from “and if” onwards.
4 & 5 Geo. 5. c. 59.The Bankruptcy Act 1914.In section 154(1), paragraphs (13) and (14).
In section 156, paragraph (a).
Section 160.
5 & 6 Geo. 5. c. 83.The Naval and Military War Pensions, etc. Act 1915Section 5.
6 & 7 Geo. c. 50.The Larceny Act 1916.The whole Act (but the repeal of section 39(2) and (3) shall not extend to Scotland).
9 & 10 Geo. 5 c. 75.The Ferries (Acquisition by Local Authorities) Act 1919.Section 4 from “If any” onwards.
10 & 11 Geo. 5. c. 36.The Pensions (Increase) Act 1920.Section 5.
11 & 12 Geo. 5 c. 39.The Admiralty Pensions Act 1921.Section 1(2).
11 & 12 Geo. 5. c. 49.The War Pensions Act 1921.Section 7(2).
19 & 20 Geo. 5. c. 29.The Government Annuities Act 1929.Section 34.
Section 61(2).
Section 64.
23 & 24 Geo. 5. c. 51.The Local Government Act 1933.In section 123, in subsection (2), the words “exact or” and, in subsection (3), the words “any of”.
2 & 3 Geo. 6. c. 82The Personal Injuries (Emergency Provisions) Act 1939.Section 6.
2 & 3 Geo. 6. c. 83.The Pensions (Navy, Army, Air Force and Mercantile Marine) Act 1939.Section 8.
5 & 6 Geo. 6. c. 28.The War Damage (Amendment) Act 1942.Section 3.
6 & 7 Geo. 6. c. 21.The War Damage Act 1943.Section 112.
7 & 8 Geo. 6. c. 21.The Pensions (Increase) Act 1944.Sections 6 and 7.
8 & 9 Geo. 6. c. 42.The Water Act 1945.In Schedule 3, section 65(2): in section 66(1) the words “or fraudulently abstracts or uses water of the undertakers”: in section 66(2) the words “or for enabling him fraudulently to abstract or use water” and the words from “or as” onwards.
10 & 11 Geo. 6. c. 41.The Fire Services Act 1947.In section 26(4) the words from “by means of” to “infirmity or”, where next occurring, and the words “or by any other fraudulent conduct”.
11 & 12 Geo. 6. c. 24.The Police Pensions Act 1948.In section 7(2) the words from “by means of” to “infirmity or”, where next occurring, and the words “or by any other fraudulent conduct”.
11 & 12 Geo. 6. c. 38.The Companies Act 1948.Section 84.
In section 328(1), paragraphs (m) and (n) and any reference to either of those paragraphs.
Section 330(a).
11 & 12 Geo. 6. c. 67.The Gas Act 1948.In Schedule 3, in paragraph 29(1), the words “or fraudulently abstracts, consumes or uses gas of the Board,” and in paragraph 29(3) the words “or for abstracting, consuming or using gas of the Board” and the words “abstraction or consumption”.
14 Geo. 6. c. 36.The Diseases of Animals Act 1950.Section 78(2)(x).
15 & 16 Geo. 6. & 1 Eliz. 2. c. 10.The Income Tax Act 1952.Section 505 (but this repeal shall not extend to Scotland).
15 & 16 Geo. 6. & 1 Eliz. 2. c. 25.The National Health Service Act 1952.In section 6 the words from “he shall” to “section”.
15 & 16 Geo. 6. & 1 Eliz 2. c. 43.The Disposal of Uncollected Goods Act 1952.In section 3(3) the words from “or who” to “particular”.
1 & 2 Eliz. 2. c. 36.The Post Office Act 1953. Sections 52 and 54 and in section 57 the words “steals, or for any purpose whatever embezzles” (but these repeals shall not extend to Scotland).
1 & 2 Eliz. 2. c. 50.The Auxillary Forces Act 1953.Section 29(2).
4 & 5 Eliz. 2. c. 16.The Foods and Drugs Act 1955.Section 60, so far as unrepealed.
7 & 8 Eliz. 2. c. 28.The Income Tax (Repayment of Post-War Credits) Act 1959.Section 1(6) (but this repeal shall not extend to Scotland).
8 & 9 Eliz. 2. c. 16.The Road Traffic Act 1960.Section 217 (but this repeal shall not extend to Scotland).
1964 c. 28.The Agriculture and Horticulture Act 1964.In the Schedule, paragraph 3 from the words “or on conviction on indictment” onwards.
1966 c. 32.The Selective Employment Payments Act 1966.Section 8(2)(a), (b) and (d) and (ii)
1966 c. 34.The Industrial Development Act 1966.Section 9.
1967 c. 1.The Land Commission Act 1967.Section 81(5)(a).
Section 93.
Section 93.
1967 c. 9.The General Rate Act 1967.Section 49(8).
1967 c. 12.The Teachers’ Superannuation Act 1967.Section 14.
1967 c. 22.The Agriculture Act 1967.Section 69(1)(ii).
1967 c. 29.The Housing Subsidies Act 1967.Section 31.
1967 c. 34.The Industrial Injuries and Diseases (Old Cases) Act 1967.In section 12(2) the words “section 11(1) of this Act”.
1967 c. 85.The Vessels Protection Act 1967.The whole Act.

Part IIE+W+S Obsolete and Redundant Enactments

Session and ChapterShort TitleExtent of Repeal
34 & 35 Hen. 8. c. 26.The Laws in Wales Act 1542.Section 47 from “Item, that no person” onwards.
36 Geo. 3. c. 88.The Hay and Straw Act 1796.The whole Act.
5 Geo. 4. c. 83.The Vagrancy Act 1824Sections 16 and 21.
4 & 5 Will. 4. c. 21.The Hay and Straw Act 1834.The whole Act.
3 & 4 Vict. c. 50.The Canals (Offences) Act 1840.Sections 13, 15, 17 and 19.
14 & 15 Vict. c. 19.The Prevention of Offences Act 1851.Sections 12 and 13.
18 & 19 Vict. c. 126.The Criminal Justice Act 1855.The whole Act, so far as unrepealed.
19 & 20 Vict. c. 114.The Hay and Straw Act 1856.The whole Act.
32 & 33 Vict. c. 57.The Seamen’s Clothing Act 1869.The whole Act.
33 & 34 Vict. c. 65.The Larceny (Advertisements) Act 1870.The whole Act.
34 & 35 Vict. c. 112.The Prevention of Crimes Act 1871.Sections 10 and 11.
39 & 40 Vict. c. 20.The Statute Law Revision (Substituted Enactments) Act 1876.Section 4.
59 & 60 Vict. c. 25The Friendly Societies Act 1896Section 87(2).
61 & 62 Vict. c. 36.The Criminal Evidence Act 1898.In the Schedule, the entries for the Vagrancy Act 1824 and for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children Act 1894.
4 & 5 Geo. 5. c. 14.The Currency and Bank Notes Act 1914.The whole Act.

Part IIIE+W+S Consequential Repeals

Session and ChapterShort TitleExtent of Repeal
2 & 3 Vict. c. 47.The Metropolitan Police Act 1839.Section 66 from “and any person” onwards.
2 & 3 Vict. c. 71.The Metropolitan Police Courts Act 1839.Section 25.
3 & 4 Vict. c. 50.The Canals (Offences) Act 1840.Section 11 from the beginning to “law; and”.
33 & 34 Vict. c. 52.The Extradition Act 1870In Schedule 1 the entries relating to embezzlement and larceny, to obtaining money or goods by false pretences, to fraud by bailees and others, to burglary and housebreaking, to robbery with violence and to threats by letter or otherwise with intent to extort.
35 & 36 Vict. c. 93.The Pawnbrokers Act 1872.In section 30, paragraph (2) (but this repeal shall not extend to Scotland).
38 & 39 Vict. c. 83.The Local Loans Act 1875.Sections 32.
40 & 41 Vict. c. 59The Colonial Stock Act 1877.Section 21.
45 & 46 Vict. c. 75.The Married Women’s Property Act 1882.Sections 12 and 16, so far as unrepealed
47 & 48 Vict. c. 14.The Married Women’s Property Act 1884.The whole Act.
47 & 48 Vict. c. 44.The Naval Pensions Act 1884.In section 2 the words “or the Admiralty (Powers, etc.) Act 1865”.
56 & 57 Vict. c. 71.The Sale of Goods Act 1893.Section 24.
60 & 61 Vict. c.30.The Police (Property) Act 1897.In section 1(1), the words “section 103 of the Larceny Act 1861”.
61 & 62 Vict. c. 36.The Criminal Evidence Act 1898.In the Schedule the entry for the Married Women’s Property Act 1882.
16 & 17 Geo. 5. c. 7.The Bankruptcy (Amendment) Act 1926.In section 5 the words “(13), (14) and” wherever occurring.
25 & 26 Geo. 5. c. 30.The Law Reform (Married Women and Tortfeasors) Act 1935.In Schedule 1 the entries amending section 12 of the Married Women’s Property Act 1882 and the Larceny Act 1916.
11 & 12 Geo. 6. c. 58.The Criminal Justice Act 1948.In section 41, subsection (3), in subsection (4) the words “or statutory declaration” and the words from “or the person” onwards.
12, 13 & 14 Geo. 6. c. 36.The War Damage (Public Utility Undertakings, etc.) Act 1949.Section 10(9)(e).
14 & 15 Geo. 6. c. 39.The Common Informers Act 1951.In the Schedule the entry relating to the Larceny Act 1861 section 102.
15 & 16 Geo. 6. & 1 Eliz. 2. c. 45.The Pensions (Increase) Act 1952.In Schedule 3 the entries for sections 6 and 7 of 7 & 8 Geo. 6. c. 21.
15 & 16 Geo. 6. & 1 Eliz. 2. c. 55.The Magistrates’ Courts Act 1952.Section 33.
In Schedule 1, entries Nos. 1, 5 and 6.
15 & 16 Geo. 6. & 1 Eliz. 2. c. 67.The Visiting Forces Act 1952.In the Schedule, paragraph 1(b)(v) and paragraph 3(a), (d) and (e).
1 & 2 Eliz. 2. c. 36.The Post Office Act 1953.In section 23(1), the words “and of the Larceny Act 1916”.
8 & 9 Eliz. 2. c. 44.The Finance Act 1960.Section 55 (but this repeal shall not extend to Scotland).
10 & 11 Eliz. 2. c. 15.The Criminal Justice Administration Act 1962.In Schedule 3, paragraphs 4, 5, 6 and 8.
10 & 11 Eliz. 2. c. 46.The Transport Act 1962.In Part I of Schedule 2 the entry for the Criminal Justice Act 1948.
10 & 11 Eliz 2. c. 59.The Road Traffic Act 1962.Section 44 (but this repeal shall not extend to Scotland).
1964 c. 26.The Licensing Act 1964.Section 100(4)(d).
1967 c. 58.The Criminal Law Act 1967.Section 4(7).
In Schedule 1, in List A, item 1 in Division II, and, in List B, item 13.
In Schedule 2, paragraph 2(1)(a); in paragraph 4 the word “embezzlement”; paragraph 12, except in subparagraph (2) the words from “in the Bankruptcy Act” onwards and except subparagraph (6); and paragraph 13(1)(b).
1968 c.19.The Criminal Appeal Act 1968.In section 30, in subsection (1) the words from “and the operation” to “on conviction”, in subsection (2) the words “or of section 24(1) of the Sale of Goods Act 1893” and the words “or that subsection, as the case may be”, and in subsection (3) the words “or of the said section 24(1)”.
Section 42(4).
1968 c. 27.The Firearms Act 1968.In section 17, subsection (3) and in subsection (5) the words from “and” onwards.

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