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Serious Crime Act 2015

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This is the original version (as it was originally enacted).

73Female genital mutilation protection orders

This section has no associated Explanatory Notes

(1)After section 5 of the Female Genital Mutilation Act 2003 insert—

5AFemale genital mutilation protection orders

(1)Schedule 2 provides for the making of female genital mutilation protection orders.

(2)In that Schedule—

(a)Part 1 makes provision about powers of courts in England and Wales to make female genital mutilation protection orders;

(b)Part 2 makes provision about powers of courts in Northern Ireland to make such orders.

(2)After Schedule 1 to that Act (inserted by section 71(2) above) insert—

SCHEDULE 2Female genital mutilation protection orders
PART 1England and Wales
Power to make FGM protection order

1(1)The court in England and Wales may make an order (an “FGM protection order”) for the purposes of—

(a)protecting a girl against the commission of a genital mutilation offence, or

(b)protecting a girl against whom any such offence has been committed.

(2)In deciding whether to exercise its powers under this paragraph and, if so, in what manner, the court must have regard to all the circumstances, including the need to secure the health, safety and well-being of the girl to be protected.

(3)An FGM protection order may contain—

(a)such prohibitions, restrictions or requirements, and

(b)such other terms,

as the court considers appropriate for the purposes of the order.

(4)The terms of an FGM protection order may, in particular, relate to—

(a)conduct outside England and Wales as well as (or instead of) conduct within England and Wales;

(b)respondents who are, or may become, involved in other respects as well as (or instead of) respondents who commit or attempt to commit, or may commit or attempt to commit, a genital mutilation offence against a girl;

(c)other persons who are, or may become, involved in other respects as well as respondents of any kind.

(5)For the purposes of sub-paragraph (4) examples of involvement in other respects are—

(a)aiding, abetting, counselling, procuring, encouraging or assisting another person to commit, or attempt to commit, a genital mutilation offence against a girl;

(b)conspiring to commit, or to attempt to commit, such an offence.

(6)An FGM protection order may be made for a specified period or until varied or discharged (see paragraph 6).

Applications and other occasions for making orders

2(1)The court may make an FGM protection order—

(a)on an application being made to it, or

(b)without an application being made to it but in the circumstances mentioned in sub-paragraph (6).

(2)An application may be made by—

(a)the girl who is to be protected by the order, or

(b)a relevant third party.

(3)An application may be made by any other person with the leave of the court.

(4)In deciding whether to grant leave, the court must have regard to all the circumstances including—

(a)the applicant’s connection with the girl to be protected;

(b)the applicant’s knowledge of the circumstances of the girl.

(5)An application under this paragraph may be made in other family proceedings or without any other family proceedings being instituted.

(6)The circumstances in which the court may make an order without an application being made are where—

(a)any other family proceedings are before the court (“the current proceedings”),

(b)the court considers that an FGM protection order should be made to protect a girl (whether or not a party to the proceedings), and

(c)a person who would be a respondent to any proceedings for an FGM protection order is a party to the current proceedings.

(7)In this paragraph—

  • “family proceedings” has the same meaning as in Part 4 of the Family Law Act 1996 (see section 63(1) and (2) of that Act), but also includes—

    (a)

    proceedings under the inherent jurisdiction of the High Court in relation to adults,

    (b)

    proceedings in which the court has made an emergency protection order under section 44 of the Children Act 1989 which includes an exclusion requirement (as defined in section 44A(3) of that Act), and

    (c)

    proceedings in which the court has made an order under section 50 of the Children Act 1989 (recovery of abducted children etc);

  • “relevant third party” means a person specified, or falling within a description of persons specified, by regulations made by the Lord Chancellor (and such regulations may, in particular, specify the Secretary of State).

(8)Regulations under sub-paragraph (7) are to be made by statutory instrument, and any such instrument is subject to annulment in pursuance of a resolution of either House of Parliament.

Power to make order in criminal proceedings

3The court before which there are criminal proceedings in England and Wales for a genital mutilation offence may make an FGM protection order (without an application being made to it) if—

(a)the court considers that an FGM protection order should be made to protect a girl (whether or not the victim of the offence in relation to the criminal proceedings), and

(b)a person who would be a respondent to any proceedings for an FGM protection order is a defendant in the criminal proceedings.

Offence of breaching order

4(1)A person who without reasonable excuse does anything that the person is prohibited from doing by an FGM protection order is guilty of an offence.

(2)In the case of an FGM protection order made by virtue of paragraph 5(1), a person can be guilty of an offence under this paragraph only in respect of conduct engaged in at a time when the person was aware of the existence of the order.

(3)Where a person is convicted of an offence under this paragraph in respect of any conduct, the conduct is not punishable as a contempt of court.

(4)A person cannot be convicted of an offence under this paragraph in respect of any conduct which has been punished as a contempt of court.

(5)A person guilty of an offence under this paragraph is liable—

(a)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years, or a fine, or both;

(b)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months, or a fine, or both.

(6)A reference in any enactment to proceedings under this Part of this Schedule, or to an order under this Part of this Schedule, does not include a reference to proceedings for an offence under this paragraph or to an order made in proceedings for such an offence.

(7)“Enactment” includes an enactment contained in subordinate legislation within the meaning of the Interpretation Act 1978.

Ex parte orders

5(1)The court may, in any case where it is just and convenient to do so, make an FGM protection order even though the respondent has not been given such notice of the proceedings as would otherwise be required by rules of court.

(2)In deciding whether to exercise its powers under sub-paragraph (1), the court must have regard to all the circumstances including—

(a)the risk to the girl, or to another person, of becoming a victim of a genital mutilation offence if the order is not made immediately,

(b)whether it is likely that an applicant will be deterred or prevented from pursuing an application if an order is not made immediately, and

(c)whether there is reason to believe that—

(i)the respondent is aware of the proceedings but is deliberately evading service, and

(ii)the delay involved in effecting substituted service will cause serious prejudice to the girl to be protected or (if different) an applicant.

(3)The court must give the respondent an opportunity to make representations about an order made by virtue of sub-paragraph (1).

(4)The opportunity must be—

(a)as soon as just and convenient, and

(b)at a hearing of which notice has been given to all the parties in accordance with rules of court.

Variation and discharge of orders

6(1)The court may vary or discharge an FGM protection order on an application by—

(a)any party to the proceedings for the order,

(b)the girl being protected by the order (if not a party to the proceedings for the order), or

(c)any person affected by the order.

(2)In the case of an order made in criminal proceedings under paragraph 3, the reference in sub-paragraph (1)(a) to a party to the proceedings for the order is to be read as a reference to the prosecution and the defendant.

(3)In addition, the court may vary or discharge an FGM protection order made by virtue of paragraph 2(1)(b) or 3 even though no application under sub-paragraph (1) above has been made to the court.

(4)Paragraph 5 applies to a variation of an FGM protection order as it applies to the making of such an order (and references in that paragraph to the making of an FGM protection order are to be read accordingly).

Arrest under warrant

7(1)An interested party may apply to the relevant judge for the issue of a warrant for the arrest of a person if the interested party considers that the person has failed to comply with an FGM protection order or is otherwise in contempt of court in relation to such an order.

(2)The relevant judge must not issue a warrant on an application under sub-paragraph (1) unless—

(a)the application is substantiated on oath, and

(b)the relevant judge has reasonable grounds for believing that the person to be arrested has failed to comply with the order or is otherwise in contempt of court in relation to the order.

(3)In this paragraph “interested party”, in relation to an FGM protection order, means—

(a)the girl being protected by the order,

(b)(if a different person) the person who applied for the order, or

(c)any other person;

but no application may be made under sub-paragraph (1) by a person falling within paragraph (c) without leave of the relevant judge.

Remand: general

8(1)The court before which an arrested person is brought by virtue of a warrant under paragraph 7 may, if the matter is not then disposed of immediately, remand the person concerned.

(2)Paragraphs 9 to 14 contain further provision about the powers of a court to remand under this paragraph.

(3)Sub-paragraph (4) applies if a person remanded under this paragraph is granted bail under paragraphs 10 to 14.

(4)The person may be required by the relevant judge to comply, before release on bail or later, with such requirements as appear to the judge to be necessary to secure that the person does not interfere with witnesses or otherwise obstruct the course of justice.

Remand: medical examination and report

9(1)Any power to remand a person under paragraph 8(1) may be exercised for the purpose of enabling a medical examination and report to be made if the relevant judge has reason to consider that a medical report will be required.

(2)If such a power is so exercised, the adjournment must not be for more than four weeks at a time unless the relevant judge remands the accused in custody.

(3)If the relevant judge remands the accused in custody, the adjournment must not be for more than three weeks at a time.

(4)Sub-paragraph (5) applies if there is reason to suspect that a person who has been arrested under a warrant issued on an application under paragraph 7(1) is suffering from mental disorder within the meaning of the Mental Health Act 1983.

(5)The relevant judge has the same power to make an order under section 35 of the Mental Health Act 1983 (remand for report on accused’s mental condition) as the Crown Court has under section 35 of that Act in the case of an accused person within the meaning of that section.

Remand: further provision

10(1)Where a court has power to remand a person under paragraph 8, the court may remand the person in custody or on bail.

(2)If remanded in custody, the person is to be committed to custody to be brought before the court—

(a)at the end of the period of remand, or

(b)at such earlier time as the court may require.

(3)The court may remand a person on bail—

(a)by taking from the person a recognizance (with or without sureties) conditioned as provided in paragraph 11, or

(b)by fixing the amount of the recognizances with a view to their being taken subsequently in accordance with paragraph 14 and, in the meantime, committing the person to custody as mentioned in sub-paragraph (2) above.

(4)Where a person is brought before the court after remand the court may further remand the person.

(5)In this paragraph and in paragraphs 11 to 14, references to “the court” includes a reference to a judge of the court or, in the case of proceedings in a magistrates’ court, a justice of the peace.

11(1)Where a person is remanded on bail, the court may direct that the person’s recognizance be conditioned for his or her appearance—

(a)before the court at the end of the period of remand, or

(b)at every time and place to which during the course of the proceedings the hearing may from time to time be adjourned.

(2)Where a recognizance is conditioned for a person’s appearance as mentioned in sub-paragraph (1), the fixing of any time for the person next to appear is to be treated as a remand.

(3)Nothing in this paragraph deprives the court of power at any subsequent hearing to remand a person afresh.

12(1)The court may not remand a person for a period exceeding 8 clear days unless—

(a)the court adjourns a case under paragraph 9(1), or

(b)the person is remanded on bail and both that person and the other party to the proceedings (or, in the case of criminal proceedings, the prosecution) consent.

(2)If sub-paragraph (1)(a) applies, the person may be remanded for the period of the adjournment.

(3)Where the court has power to remand a person in custody, the person may be committed to the custody of a constable if the remand is for a period not exceeding 3 clear days.

13(1)If the court is satisfied that a person who has been remanded is unable by reason of illness or accident to appear before the court at the end of the period of remand, the court may further remand the person in his or her absence.

(2)The power in sub-paragraph (1) may, in the case of a person who was remanded on bail, be exercised by enlarging the person’s recognizance and those of any sureties to a later time.

(3)Where a person remanded on bail is bound to appear before the court at any time and the court has no power to remand the person under sub-paragraph (1), the court may, in the person’s absence, enlarge the person’s recognizance and those of any sureties for the person to a later time.

(4)The enlargement of a person’s recognizance is to be treated as a further remand.

(5)Paragraph 12(1) (limit of remand) does not apply to the exercise of the powers conferred by this paragraph.

14(1)This paragraph applies where under paragraph 10(3)(b) the court fixes the amount in which the principal and the sureties (if any) are to be bound.

(2)The recognizance may afterwards be taken by a person prescribed by rules of court (with the same consequences as if it had been entered into before the court).

Contempt proceedings

15The powers of the court in relation to contempt of court arising out of a person’s failure to comply with an FGM protection order, or otherwise in connection with such an order, may be exercised by the relevant judge.

Other protection or assistance against female genital mutilation

16(1)Nothing in this Part of this Schedule affects any other protection or assistance available to a girl who is or may become the victim of a genital mutilation offence.

(2)In particular, it does not affect—

(a)the inherent jurisdiction of the High Court;

(b)any criminal liability;

(c)any civil remedies under the Protection from Harassment Act 1997;

(d)any right to an occupation order or a non-molestation order under Part 4 of the Family Law Act 1996;

(e)any right to a forced marriage protection order under Part 4A of that Act;

(f)any protection or assistance under the Children Act 1989;

(g)any claim in tort.

Interpretation

17(1)In this Part of this Schedule—

  • “the court”, except as provided in sub-paragraph (2), means the High Court, or the family court, in England and Wales;

  • “FGM protection order” means an order under paragraph 1;

  • “genital mutilation offence” means an offence under section 1, 2 or 3;

  • “the relevant judge”, in relation to an FGM protection order, means—

    (a)

    where the order was made by the High Court, a judge of that court;

    (b)

    where the order was made by the family court, a judge of that court;

    (c)

    where the order was made by a court in criminal proceedings under paragraph 3

    (i)

    a judge of that court, or

    (ii)

    a judge of the High Court or of the family court.

(2)Where the power to make an FGM protection order is exercisable by a court in criminal proceedings under paragraph 3, references in this Part of this Schedule to “the court” (other than in paragraph 2) are to be read as references to that court.

(3)In paragraph (c)(i) of the definition of “relevant judge” in sub-paragraph (1), the reference to a judge of the court that made the order includes, in the case of criminal proceedings in a magistrates’ court, a reference to a justice of the peace.

PART 2Northern Ireland
Power to make FGM protection order

18(1)The court in Northern Ireland may make an order (an “FGM protection order”) for the purposes of—

(a)protecting a girl against the commission of a genital mutilation offence, or

(b)protecting a girl against whom any such offence has been committed.

(2)In deciding whether to exercise its powers under this paragraph and, if so, in what manner, the court must have regard to all the circumstances, including the need to secure the health, safety and well-being of the girl to be protected.

(3)An FGM protection order may contain—

(a)such prohibitions, restrictions or requirements, and

(b)such other terms,

as the court considers appropriate for the purposes of the order.

(4)The terms of an FGM protection order may, in particular, relate to—

(a)conduct outside Northern Ireland as well as (or instead of) conduct within Northern Ireland;

(b)respondents who are, or may become, involved in other respects as well as (or instead of) respondents who commit or attempt to commit, or may commit or attempt to commit, a genital mutilation offence against a girl;

(c)other persons who are, or may become, involved in other respects as well as respondents of any kind.

(5)For the purposes of sub-paragraph (4) examples of involvement in other respects are—

(a)aiding, abetting, counselling, procuring, encouraging or assisting another person to commit, or attempt to commit, a genital mutilation offence against a girl;

(b)conspiring to commit, or to attempt to commit, such an offence.

(6)An FGM protection order may be made for a specified period or until varied or discharged (see paragraph 23).

Applications and other occasions for making orders

19(1)The court may make an FGM protection order—

(a)on an application being made to it, or

(b)without an application being made to it but in the circumstances mentioned in sub-paragraph (6).

(2)An application may be made by—

(a)the girl who is to be protected by the order, or

(b)a relevant third party.

(3)An application may be made by any other person with the leave of the court.

(4)In deciding whether to grant leave, the court must have regard to all the circumstances including—

(a)the applicant’s connection with the girl to be protected;

(b)the applicant’s knowledge of the circumstances of the girl.

(5)An application under this paragraph may be made in family proceedings or without any family proceedings being instituted.

(6)The circumstances in which the court may make an order without an application being made are where—

(a)any family proceedings are before the court (“the current proceedings”),

(b)the court considers that an FGM protection order should be made to protect a girl (whether or not a party to the proceedings), and

(c)a person who would be a respondent to any proceedings for an FGM protection order is a party to the current proceedings.

(7)In this paragraph—

  • “family proceedings” has the same meaning as in the Family Homes and Domestic Violence (Northern Ireland) Order 1998 (S.I. 1998/1071 (N.I. 6)) (see Article 2(2) and (3) of that Order), but also includes—

    (a)

    proceedings under the inherent jurisdiction of the High Court in relation to adults,

    (b)

    proceedings in which the court has made an emergency protection order under Article 63 of the Children (Northern Ireland) Order 1995 (S.I. 1995/755 (N.I. 2)) which includes an exclusion requirement (as defined in Article 63A of that Order), and

    (c)

    proceedings in which the court has made an order under Article 69 of that 1995 Order (recovery of abducted children etc);

  • “relevant third party” means a person specified, or falling within a description of persons specified, by order made by the Department of Finance and Personnel (and any such order may, in particular, specify that Department).

Power to make order in criminal proceedings

20The court before which there are criminal proceedings in Northern Ireland for a genital mutilation offence may make an FGM protection order (without an application being made to it) if—

(a)the court considers that an FGM protection order should be made to protect a girl (whether or not the victim of the offence in relation to the criminal proceedings), and

(b)a person who would be a respondent to any proceedings for an FGM protection order is a defendant in the criminal proceedings.

Offence of breaching order

21(1)A person who without reasonable excuse does anything that the person is prohibited from doing by an FGM protection order is guilty of an offence.

(2)A person guilty of an offence under this paragraph is liable—

(a)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years, or a fine, or both;

(b)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding six months, or a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum, or both.

Ex parte orders

22(1)The court may, in any case where it is just and convenient to do so, make an FGM protection order even though the respondent has not been given such notice of the proceedings as would otherwise be required by rules of court.

(2)In deciding whether to exercise its powers under sub-paragraph (1), the court must have regard to all the circumstances including—

(a)the risk to the girl, or to another person, of becoming a victim of a genital mutilation offence if the order is not made immediately,

(b)whether it is likely that an applicant will be deterred or prevented from pursuing an application if an order is not made immediately, and

(c)whether there is reason to believe that—

(i)the respondent is aware of the proceedings but is deliberately evading service, and

(ii)the delay involved in effecting substituted service will cause serious prejudice to the girl to be protected or (if different) an applicant.

(3)If the court makes an order by virtue of sub-paragraph (1), it must specify a date for a full hearing.

(4)In sub-paragraph (3), “full hearing” means a hearing of which notice has been given to all the parties in accordance with rules of court.

Variation and discharge of orders

23(1)The court may vary or discharge an FGM protection order on an application by—

(a)any party to the proceedings for the order,

(b)the girl being protected by the order (if not a party to the proceedings for the order), or

(c)any person affected by the order.

(2)In the case of an order made in criminal proceedings under paragraph 20, the reference in sub-paragraph (1)(a) to a party to the proceedings for the order is to be read as a reference to the prosecution and the defendant.

(3)In addition, the court may vary or discharge an FGM protection order made by virtue of paragraph 19(1)(b) or 20 even though no application under sub-paragraph (1) above has been made to the court.

(4)Paragraph 22 applies to a variation of an FGM protection order as it applies to the making of such an order (and references in that paragraph to the making of an FGM protection order are to be read accordingly).

Jurisdiction of courts

24(1)For the purposes of this Part of this Schedule, “the court” means the High Court, or a county court, in Northern Ireland.

(2)Sub-paragraph (1) is subject to—

(a)sub-paragraph (3), and

(b)any provision made by virtue of sub-paragraph (4) or (5).

(3)Where the power to make an FGM protection order is exercisable by a court in criminal proceedings under paragraph 20, references in this Part of this Schedule to “the court” (other than in paragraph 19) are to be read as references to that court.

(4)Article 34(3) to (10) of the Family Homes and Domestic Violence (Northern Ireland) Order 1998 (S.I. 1998/1071 (N.I. 6)) (allocation of proceedings to courts etc) applies for the purposes of this Part of this Schedule as it applies for the purposes of that Order but as if the following modification were made.

(5)The modification is that Article 34(8) is to be read as if there were substituted for it—

(8)For the purposes of paragraphs (3), (4) and (5), there are two levels of court—

(a)the High Court; and

(b)a county court.

Power to extend jurisdiction to courts of summary jurisdiction

25(1)The Department of Justice in Northern Ireland may, after consulting the Lord Chief Justice, by order provide for courts of summary jurisdiction to be included among the courts who may hear proceedings under this Part of this Schedule.

(2)An order under sub-paragraph (1) may, in particular, make any provision in relation to courts of summary jurisdiction which corresponds to provision made in relation to such courts by or under the Family Homes and Domestic Violence (Northern Ireland) Order 1998 (S.I. 1998/1071 (N.I. 6)).

(3)Any power to make an order under this paragraph (including the power as extended by paragraph 29(1)) may, in particular, be exercised by amending, repealing, revoking or otherwise modifying any provision made by or under this Part of this Schedule or any other enactment.

(4)In sub-paragraph (3) “enactment” includes Northern Ireland legislation.

(5)The Lord Chief Justice may nominate any of the following to exercise the Lord Chief Justice’s functions under this Part of this Schedule—

(a)the holder of one of the offices listed in Schedule 1 to the Justice (Northern Ireland) Act 2002;

(b)a Lord Justice of Appeal (as defined by section 88 of that Act).

Contempt proceedings

26The powers of the court in relation to contempt of court arising out of a person’s failure to comply with an FGM protection order, or otherwise in connection with such an order, may be exercised by the relevant judge.

Appeals from county courts

27(1)An appeal lies to the High Court against—

(a)the making by a county court of any order under this Part of this Schedule, or

(b)any refusal by a county court to make such an order,

as if the decision had been made in the exercise of the jurisdiction conferred by Part 3 of the County Courts (Northern Ireland) Order 1980 (S.I. 1980/397 (N.I. 3)) (original civil jurisdiction) and the appeal were brought under Article 60 of that Order (ordinary appeals in civil cases).

(2)But an appeal does not lie to the High Court under sub-paragraph (1) where the county court is a divorce county court exercising jurisdiction under the Matrimonial Causes (Northern Ireland) Order 1978 (S.I. 1978/1045 (N.I. 15)) in the same proceedings.

(3)Provision must be made by rules of court for an appeal to lie (upon a point of law, a question of fact or the admission or rejection of any evidence) to the Court of Appeal against—

(a)the making of any order under this Part of this Schedule, or

(b)any refusal to make such an order,

by a county court of the type referred to in sub-paragraph (2).

(4)Sub-paragraph (3) is without prejudice to Article 61 of the County Courts (Northern Ireland) Order 1980 (S.I. 1980/397 (N.I. 3)) (cases stated).

(5)On an appeal under sub-paragraph (1), the High Court may make such orders as may be necessary to give effect to its determination of the appeal.

(6)Where an order is made under sub-paragraph (5), the High Court may also make such incidental or consequential orders as appear to it to be just.

(7)Any order of the High Court made on an appeal under sub-paragraph (1) (other than one directing that an application be re-heard by the county court) is to be treated, for the purposes of—

(a)the enforcement of the order, and

(b)any power to vary, revive or discharge orders,

as if it were an order of the county court from which the appeal was brought and not an order of the High Court.

(8)This paragraph is subject to paragraph 28.

Appeals: transfers and proposed transfers

28(1)The Department of Justice in Northern Ireland may, after consulting the Lord Chief Justice, by order make provision as to the circumstances in which appeals may be made against decisions taken by courts on questions arising in connection with the transfer, or proposed transfer, of proceedings by virtue of an order made under Article 34(5) of the Family Homes and Domestic Violence (Northern Ireland) Order 1998 (S.I. 1998/1071 (N.I. 6)) as applied by paragraph 24(4) and (5) above.

(2)Except so far as provided for in any order made under sub-paragraph (1), no appeal may be made against any decision of a kind mentioned in that sub-paragraph.

(3)The Lord Chief Justice may nominate any of the following to exercise the Lord Chief Justice’s functions under this paragraph—

(a)the holder of one of the offices listed in Schedule 1 to the Justice (Northern Ireland) Act 2002;

(b)a Lord Justice of Appeal (as defined in section 88 of that Act).

Orders

29(1)An order made under or by virtue of paragraph 19(7), 24(4) and (5), 25(1) or 28(1)

(a)may make different provision for different purposes;

(b)may contain incidental, supplemental, consequential, transitional, transitory or saving provision;

(c)is to be made by statutory rule for the purposes of the Statutory Rules (Northern Ireland) Order 1979 (S.I. 1979/1573 (N.I. 12)).

(2)An order made under or by virtue of paragraph 19(7), 24(4) and (5) or 28(1) is subject to negative resolution (within the meaning of section 41(6) of the Interpretation Act (Northern Ireland) 1954 (c. 33 (N.I.))).

(3)An order under paragraph 25(1) may not be made unless a draft of the order has been laid before, and approved by a resolution of, the Northern Ireland Assembly.

(4)Section 41(3) of the Interpretation Act (Northern Ireland) 1954 (c. 33 (N.I.)) applies for the purposes of sub-paragraph (3) in relation to the laying of a draft as it applies in relation to the laying of a statutory document under an enactment.

Other protection or assistance against female genital mutilation

30(1)Nothing in this Part of this Schedule affects any other protection or assistance available to a girl who is or may become the victim of a genital mutilation offence.

(2)In particular, it does not affect—

(a)the inherent jurisdiction of the High Court;

(b)any criminal liability;

(c)any right to an occupation order or a non-molestation order under the Family Homes and Domestic Violence (Northern Ireland) Order 1998 (S.I. 1998/1071 (N.I. 6));

(d)any civil remedies under the Protection from Harassment (Northern Ireland) Order 1997 (S.I. 1997/1180 (N.I. 9));

(e)any protection or assistance under the Children (Northern Ireland) Order 1995 (S.I. 1995/755 (N.I. 2));

(f)any right to a forced marriage protection order under Schedule 1 to the Forced Marriage (Civil Protection) Act 2007;

(g)any claim in tort.

Interpretation

31In this Part of this Schedule—

  • “the court” is to be read in accordance with paragraph 24;

  • “FGM protection order” means an order under paragraph 18;

  • “genital mutilation offence” means an offence under section 1, 2 or 3;

  • “the relevant judge”, in relation to an FGM protection order, means—

    (a)

    where the order was made by the High Court, a judge of that court;

    (b)

    where the order was made by a county court, a judge or district judge of that or any other county court;

    (c)

    where the order was made by a court in criminal proceedings under paragraph 20

    (i)

    a judge of that court, or

    (ii)

    a judge of the High Court or a judge or district judge of a county court.

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