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The Local Government (Best Value Performance Indicators) (Wales) Order 2001

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Article 4

SCHEDULE 1CORPORATE GOVERNANCE INDICATORS

Indicator NumberDescription of indicatorDetails of indicator
NAWPI 1.1The level of compliance with the best value authority’s approved Welsh language scheme as reported to the Welsh Language board

The overall level of compliance with the best value authority’s approved Welsh language scheme as confirmed by the Welsh Language Board as follows:

Service delivery: very good good fair poor

  • Scheme management: very good good fair poor

to which “and/but improving” or “and/but deteriorating” is added to the performance level where appropriate.

NAWPI 1.2The level of the Commission for Racial Equality’s standard for local government to which the best value authority conforms.

The levels of the standard for local government are defined in the chapter entitled “Measurements” in the Commission for Racial Equality’s documents entitled “Auditing for Equality” and “Racial Equality means Quality”. Best value authorities should report the level they have reached as follows:—

  • Level 1: The best value authority has written a racial policy statement.

  • Level 2: The best value authority has an action plan for monitoring and achieving its racial equality policy.

  • Level 3: Results of ethnic monitoring against the equality policy and level of consultations with local communities are used to review the best value authority’s overall policy.

  • Level 4: The best value authority can demonstrate clear improvements in its services resulting from monitoring, consulting with local communities, and acting on its equal opportunities policy.

  • Level 5: The best value authority is an example of best practice in the way that it monitors and provides services to ethnic minorities, and is helping other authorities to achieve high standards. Confirmation that the best value authority has reached this level must have been provided by the Commission for Racial Equality.

To report these levels, a best value authority must have adopted the Commission for Racial Equality’s standard for local government. If the best value authority has not adopted this standard, it should report the following:

“This authority has not adopted the Commission for Racial Equality standard for local government”.

NAWPI 1.3The number of complaints to an Ombudsman classified as maladministration.Number of cases recorded and reported to authorities by the Commission for Local Administration in Wales classified as “maladministration causing injustice” or “maladministration”.
NAWPI 1.4The percentage turnout for local elections.“Turnout” is defined as the proportion of the electoral roll voting in any election in the year (except individual by-elections). Where there is no election during the financial year, best value authorities should report the turnout from the most recent election.
NAWPI 1.5The percentage of interactions with the public, by type of transaction, which are capable of electronic service delivery which are being delivered using internet protocols or other paperless methods.

Interactions means any contact between the citizen and the best value authority including (by type):

  • Providing information

  • Collecting revenue

  • Providing benefits and grants

  • Consultation

  • Regulation (such as issuing licences)

  • Applications for services

  • Booking venues, resources and courses

  • Paying for goods and services

  • Providing access to community, professional or business networks and procurement

100% should be defined within the best value authority’s e-government strategy to take account of local circumstances based on the full list of services for the best value authority is responsible and the types of interactions relevant to each service.

This indicator presumes that all services are capable of being enabled for electronic delivery unless there is a legal or operational reason why this cannot be done.

“Electronic” means delivery through internet protocols and other Information and Communication Technology (ICT) methods and includes delivery by telephone if the transaction carried out is electronically enabled i.e. the officer receiving the call can access electronic information and/or update records on-line there and then.

NAWPI 1.6The percentage of undisputed invoices which were paid by the best value authority within 30 days of such invoices being received by the best value authority.

To obtain this percentage the best value authority will need to divide the number of all the invoices for commercial goods and services paid to external contractors and suppliers within 30 days of receipt during the financial year, by the total of all invoices paid by the best value authority in that year, and multiply the result by 100.

Best value authorities may exclude invoices sent to schools and paid from delegated school budgets.

In this indicator, and for the purposes of ascertaining whether the best value authority has paid the invoice within the 30 days period, the period will commence at the time of receipt of the invoice by the best value authority (not the best value authority’s payment section). The best value authority shall then pay such invoice within 30 days. Payment includes—

  • dispatch of a cheque or other payment instrument;

  • notification to bank for Bankers Automated Clearing Service payments; or

  • bank processing of the payment if the best value authority specifies a period after which the bank is to make the payments once it has received the Bankers Automated Clearing Service (BACS) tape.

Where the best value authority does not record the date it receives the invoice it should add two days to the date of the invoice unless it has sampled invoices during that year to get a more accurate period to add to that date.

If sampling is used, the sample should be broadly representative of all invoices received by different departments and at different times of the year, and consist of at least 500 invoices.

If an invoice is received before the services have been provided or the goods received, the 30 day or any other agreed term period starts from the satisfactory receipt of goods or the satisfactory completion of the services.

NAWPI 1.7The amount of council tax received in the financial year as a percentage of the total debit for the financial year.The amount of council tax received should exclude any arrears of council tax received in respect of years prior to the financial year, and any prepayments of council tax in respect of years subsequent to the financial year. The total debit for the financial year should exclude any arrears of council tax due in respect of years prior to the financial year. All figures should exclude council tax benefits or rebates, whether these are paid for by local or central government.
NAWPI 1.8The amount of non-domestic rates payable for the financial year, adjusted for transitional relief, and less small property relief and all mandatory reliefs.The amount of non-domestic rates should exclude any arrears of non-domestic rates received in respect of years prior to the financial year, and any prepayments of non— domestic rates in respect of years subsequent to the financial year. The adjusted gross rates payable figure should exclude any arrears of non-domestic rates or reliefs due in respect of years prior to the financial year.
NAWPI 1.9The percentage of senior management posts filled by women

This indicator will need to reflect the position as at 31st March in the financial year. The percentage will be estimated by calculating the number of women in post at senior management level as a percentage of all staff in post at senior management level, where “senior management” is defined as the top three tiers of management in the best value authority. Chief Executives and Deputy Chief Executives count as one tier for this purpose.

All staff in schools maintained by the best value authority should be excluded from this calculation.

NAWPI 1.10The number of working days or shifts per full time equivalent lost due to sickness absence.

The proportion of days or shifts lost due to sickness absence will be obtained by the best value authority calculating the numerator and denominator as defined below.

“Working days or shifts” means days or shifts scheduled for work after holidays or leave days have been excluded.

The numerator is defined as the aggregate of working days lost due to sickness absence irrespective of whether this is self certified, certified by a GP or long term. This will include the days lost due to sickness of all permanent best value authority employees, including teachers, staff employed in schools and staff employed in Direct Labour Organisations and Direct Service Organisations. However,for the purposes of this numerator, the days lost due to sickness of temporary or agency staff should be disregarded. In addition, the days lost by staff on maternity or paternity leave should also be disregarded.

The denominator is defined as the average number of Full Time Equivalent (FTE) staff employed by the best value authority within a financial year. For staff who work part time, the best value authority should calculate the FTE equivalent for both the numerator and denominator on a consistent basis.

NAWPI 1.12Ill health retirements as a percentage of the best value authority’s workforce.

“Ill health retirement” can occur at any age where an independent registered medical practitioner qualified in occupational health has certified that the employee is permanently incapable of performing the duties of that employment or a broadly comparable local government employment with his or her employing best value authority because of ill-health or infirmity of mind or body.

This indicator is calculated as follows: Number of ill health retirements, divided by the total number of best value authority staff, multiplied by 100. For the purposes of calculating this indicator, staff in schools maintained by the best value authority should be included.

NAWPI 1.13The number of staff declaring that they meet the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 disability definition as a percentage of the the best value authority’s workforce.

The Disability Discrimination Act 1995 (1995 c. 50) states that “a person has a disability for the purposes of this Act if he has a physical or mental impairment which has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on his ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.”

The indicator is calculated as follows:

Number of disabled staff, divided by the total number of best value authority staff, multiplied by 100.

For the purposes of calculating this indicator, staff in schools maintained by the best value authority should be included.

NAWPI 1.14The percentage of employees from minority ethnic communities within the best value authority’s workforce.

The best value authority will calculate this indicator by dividing the number of minority ethnic community staff in the best value authority by the total number of the best value authority staff. The result of this division will then be multiplied by 100.

For the purposes of calculating this indicator, staff in schools maintained by the best value authority should be included.

NAWPI 1.15The percentage of the best value authority’s buildings open to the public and that are suitable and accessible to disabled people

The percentage is to be calculated by dividing the number of buildings suitable and accessible to disabled people by the number of the buildings open to the public, multiplied by 100.

For the purpose of this indicator “buildings” means buildings from which the best value authority provides a service, of which at least a part is usually open to members of the public (but excluding public conveniences which are not integral to such buildings, and schools and educational establishments).

The meaning of “suitable and accessible to disabled people” is to be construed in accordance with Part M of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2000 (S.I. 2000/2531).

NAWPI 1.16

Racial incidents

(a)

the number of racial incidents recorded by the best value authority per 100,000 of its population

(b)

the percentage of racial incidents that resulted in further action

“Racial incidents” means any incidents regarded as such by the victim, the police or best value authority officials. The indicator applies to all of a best value authority’s services including schools and to employment by the best value authority.

“Further action” means recording the racial incident in writing and includes :

(i)

detailed investigations, for example interviews with alleged perpertrator(s)

(ii)

referral to the police or other body (for example the Commission for Racial Equality or the Citizen’s Advice Bureau)

(iii)

mediation

(iv)

a warning to the perpertrator(s), (which must be recorded if made orally)

(v)

relocation of the victim

(vi)

removal of any offending graffiti.

NAWPI 1.17The number of domestic violence refuge places per 10,000 population which are provided or supported by the best value authority

“Places” means the number of rooms providing bed spaces for a victim of domestic violence and his or her children. Rooms not normally designated as bedrooms should not be included. The figures should reflect the situation at the end of the previous financial year.

If the best value authority part funds and establishment then it can claim credit (by way of bed spaces) pro-rata to its contribution to the estabishments running cost.

“Domestic violence refuge” means emergency accommodation for persons who have been referred for help having experienced threats to their physical safety and must provide help, advice and adequate support as well as being part of an intergrated local approach to domestic violence involving partnership with other local and statutory bodies.

Article 4

SCHEDULE 2EDUCATION INDICATORS

Indicator NumberDescription of indicatorDetails of indicator
NAWPI 2.1 4/99.Average GCSE/GNVQ point score of 15/16 year olds in schools maintained by the best value authorityThe total number of points achieved before or during the summer of the financial year by the pupils aged schools maintained 15 on 31 August of the previous year and on the school roll at the time of the Annual Schools Census in January of the financial year in schools maintained by the best value authority divided by the number of those pupils. Points as set out in Annex F to NAW Circular 4/99.
NAWPI 2.2Percentage of pupils in schools maintained by the best value authority in the previous summer achieving 5 or more GCSEs at grades A* – C or the vocational equivalentThe percentage of pupils aged 15 on 31 August of the year prior to the financial year and on the school roll at the time of the Annual Schools Census in January of the financial year in schools maintained by the best value authority who achieve five or more GCSE grades A*-C or the vocational equivalent in the examinations held in the summer of the financial year and where relevant in earlier examinations during the financial year.
NAWPI 2.3Percentage of pupils in schools maintained by the best value authority achieving one or more GCSEs at grade G or above or vocational equivalent.The percentage of pupils aged 15 on 31 August of the year prior to the financial year and on the school roll in January of the financial year at the time of the Annual Schools Census in schools maintained by the best value authority who achieve one or more GCSE grade G or above or the vocational equivalent in the examinations held in the summer of the financial year and where relevant in earlier examinations during the financial year.
NAWPI 2.4

Percentage of 11 year olds in schools maintained by the best value authority in the summer prior to the financial year achieving:

(a)

Level 4 or above in the Key Stage 2 Mathematics test.

(b)

Level 4 or above in the Key Stage 2 English test.

(c)

Level 4 or above on the National Curriculum scale in Welsh (first language).

(d)

Level 4 above on the National Curriculum scale in science.

See The Education (School Performance and Unauthorised Absence Targets) (Wales) Regulations 1999 [S.I. 1999 No. 1811] which came into force on 1 September 1999.

The percentages relate to pupils who are assessed in the individual subjects.

NAWPI 2.5

Percentage of 14 year olds in schools maintained by the best value authority in the summer prior to the financial year achieving:

(a)

Level 5 or above on the National Curriculum scale in Mathematics.

(b)

Level 5 or above on the National Curriculum scale in English.

(c)

Level 5 or above on the National Curriculum scale in Welsh (first language)

(d)

Level 5 or above on the National Curriculum scale in Science

See The Education (School Performance and Unauthorised Absence Targets) (Wales) Regulations 1999 [S.I. 1999 No. 1811] which came into force on 1 September 1999.

The percentages relate to pupils who are assessed in the individual subjects.

NAWPI 2.6Percentage of 15/16 year olds achieving the “core subject indicator” – Those pupils achieving at least grade C in GSCE English or Welsh, Mathematics and Science in combination.

See The Education (School Performance and Unauthorised Absence Targets) (Wales) Regulations 1999 [S.I. 1999 No. 1811] which came into force on 1 September 1999.

The percentages relate to pupils who are assessed in the individual subjects.

NAWPI 2.7Percentage of 15/16 year olds leaving full time education without a recognised qualification.See The Education (School Performance and Unauthorised Absence Targets) (Wales) Regulations 1999 [S.I. 1999 No. 1811] which came into force on 1 September 1999.
NAWPI 2.8

Number of pupils permanently excluded during the year from schools maintained by the best value authority per 1000 pupils on rolls of schools maintained by the best value authority:

(a)

for primary schools.

(b)

for secondary schools

(c)

for special schools

The period covered is the academic year commencing in the September immediately before the financial year. The data is collected in the Permanent Exclusion Monitoring Form (Termly).

NAWPI 2.9Percentage of half days missed due to absence in secondary schools maintained by the best value authority

The period commences at the beginning of the school year and ending on the date of the late May Bank Holiday in the financial year. The information is collected on behalf of the NAW for the Schools Performance Information: Pupils Attendance return for the academic year commencing the September prior to the financial year (item (c) as a percentage of item (a)).

Secondary schools excludes special schools

NAWPI 2.11

The percentage of permanently excluded pupils attending:

(a)

less than 10 hours a week of alternative tuition

(b)

between 10 and 25 hours a week of alternative tuition

(c)

more than 25 hours a week of alternative tuition

This indicator is calculated by taking the number of hours of alternative tuition actually attended by a pupil while permanently excluded in the financial year, dividing those hours by the number of school days for which the pupil was permanently excluded in the financial year and multiplying the result by 5 to get the weekly average. The figure for each pupil is then assigned to the appropriate band:

(a)

under 10 hours

(b)

10 to 25 hours

(c)

over 25 hours

Alternative tuition includes home tuition, pupil referral units, any other face to face tuition or time spent in any education establishment. Where an excluded pupil is given examination leave to prepare for GCSE examinations as part of the best value authority’s normal policy on examination leave, that period should be excluded from the calculation.

NAWPI 2.12

The percentage of primary school classes with more than 30 pupils in years:

(a)

reception to 2 inclusive

(b)

3 to 6

This indicator is as per the appropriate boxes of NAW STATS 1 primary school return item 1.4 but only for the “Ordinary Classes” column.

Where a class is taught by 2 or more teachers, the number of classes should be counted after dividing the number of pupils in the class by the respective number of teachers – e.g. 40 pupils taught by 2 teachers should be counted as 2 classes of 20 pupils.

Classes that have children in the years referred to in (a) and (b) should be counted in (a).

NAWPI 2.13

(a)The number of statements issued during the year

(b)Percentage of statements with special educational need prepared within 18 weeks excluding those affected by the “exceptions to the rule” under the SEN code of practice

(a)This is as per the NAW STATS 2 return total of item 3. Figures required by this indicator are for the calendar year commencing on the January prior to the financial year.

(b)Statements prepared within 18 weeks as a percentage of all statements (including those involving other agencies). Cases where any of the exceptions listed in paragraphs 3.40 to 3.42 of the Special Education Needs (SEN) code of practice apply should be excluded. The percentage is the number of statements referred to above divided by the number of statements issued during the year multiplied by 100.

Article 4

SCHEDULE 3SOCIAL SERVICES INDICATORS

Indicator NumberDescription of indicatorDetails of indicators
NAWPI 3.1Stability of placements of children looked after by the best value authority by reference to the percentage of children looked after on the 31st March who had three or more placements during the financial year.

The numerator of the children defined in the denominator below means the number who had three or more separate placements (as defined by the Statistical Form SSDA903 collection) during the financial year ending 31 March. Include any placements that were already open on 1 April at the beginning of the year, and any which were open on 31 March at the end of the year. Include all placements regarded as “temporary”; the only exceptions being the following special cases: —

Temporary periods on holiday or in hospital, or other temporary absences of seven consecutive days or less, where the child then returned as planned to the previous placement.

The denominator means the total number of children who were looked after at 31 March. Exclude from the count any children who were looked after on that date under an agreed series of short- term placements (under the provisions of Regulation13 of the Arrangements for Placement of Children (General) Regulations 1991 S.I. 1991 No.890).

The numerator should be divided by the denominator and multiplied by 100 to obtain the percentage.

NAWPI 3.2Educational qualifications of children looked after by reference to the percentage of young people leaving care age 16 or over with at least one GCSE at Grade A* to G or General National Vocational Qualification (GNVQ)

The numerator means the number of young people who on leaving care had obtained at least one GCSE at grade A*- G or GNVQ. Include qualifications gained before the young person was looked after or gained from examinations sat while the young person was looked after, even if the results were announced after the young person ceased to be looked after. Include GCSE short courses, part one or full GNVQs at either foundation or intermediate level, and GNVQ language units. Do not include National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs).

The denominator means the number of young people who ceased to be looked after during the year ending 31 March at the age of 16 or over. Include all those in this age group leaving care regardless of how long they had been looked after before ceasing. But do not include young people who ceased after having been looked after during the year only under an agreed series of short term placements.The numerator should be divided by the denominator and multiplied by 100 to obtain the percentage.

NAWPI 3.3The percentage of young people in care on their 16th birthday who have a suitable plan for their continuing care

The numerator means the number of young people looked after by the best value authority in the financial year who on their 16th birthday had a written plan. Such plans are:

(a)

care plans for looked after children (see Regulation 3 of the Arrangements for Placement of Children (General) Regulations 1991 and the Guidance to the Children Act 1989 (1989 c. 41) Volume 3, and Volume 4, Chapter 2)

(b)

pathway plans for “eligible” children, i.e. children looked after aged 16-17 who have been looked after for more than 13 weeks cumulatively since the age of 14 (see paragraphs 19b(4) and (5) of Part II of Schedule 2 to the Childrens Act 1989).

The denominator: means the number of young people looked after by the best value authority who had their 16th birthday during the financial year.

The numerator should be divided by the denominator and multiplied by 100 to obtain the percentage.

NAWPI 3.4The percentage of first placements (for looked after children) beginning with a care plan in place

The number of first placements in the year which had a care plan, as defined for indicator 3.3, for the child at the start of the placement.

The denominator means the total number of first placements started in the year.

The numerator should be divided by the denominator and multiplied by 100 to obtain the percentage.

NAWPI 3.5Costs of services for children looked after by a best value authority by reference to gross weekly expenditure per looked after child in foster care or in a children’s home

The numerator means the gross expenditure on children looked after in foster care and children’s homes during the financial year. (Obtained from Revenue Outturn 3 return (RO3) lines 11 and 17. Gross expenditure is defined from RO3 as the sum of employee costs (column 1) and running costs including joint arrangements (column 2) minus other income including joint arrangements (column 5)).

The denominator means the total number of weeks which children spent in foster care and children’s homes during the financial year. Under children’s homes include community homes, voluntary homes and hostels and private registered children’s homes. Exclude from the count any placements that formed part of an agreed series of short term-placements (under the provisions of Regulation 13 of the Arrangement for Placement of Children (General) Regulations, 1991 (S.I. 1991 No.890)). The calculation is to be based on the total number of days of care divided by 7.

NAWPI 3.6Cost of residential or home care for adults by reference to gross cost per week

Average gross weekly cost of providing residential or home care for adults.

The numerator means the gross expenditure on residential and nursing care and home help/home care for all adult client groups including elderly people (£000's) during the financial year ending 31 March. This is obtained from Revenue Outturn 3 return (RO3) lines (32 to 34 + 38 + 48 to 50 + 54 + 64 to 66 + 70 + 84 to 86 + 90). Gross expenditure is defined from RO3 as the sum of employee costs (column 1) and running costs including joint arrangements (column 2) minus other income including joint arrangements (column 5).

The denominator means the total number of weeks all adult client groups including elderly people were supported in residential and nursing care plus the total number of weeks adult clients including elderly people received home care.

The average is obtained by dividing the numerator by the denominator.

Note: if the number of home care weeks for the year is not available a sample figure can be used, by multiplying the number of adults receiving home care in the last full week of September by 52.

NAWPI 3.7The rate of older people (aged 65 or above) helped to live at home per 1,000 of the best value authority population aged 65 or over

The numerator: People aged 65 or over helped to live at home.

Only clients who receive a package of care provided or commissioned by the authority following an assessment should be counted, not those who receive solely information or advice, an “open access” service without assessment, a vehicle badge, or are simply added to a register.

Referrals Assessments and Packages of case model (“RAP”) definition:

Form P2s sum of pages 3,5,7 row “Total of above” column “Total of clients”.

Annual Enquiry on Social Services (“AS”) definition:

Form AS2 row 2.1 sum of three age band columns for people aged 65 and over.

The denominator: Population of the best value authority aged 65 or over (000's).

NAWPI 3.8The rate of delayed transfers of care for social care reasons per 1000 population aged 75 or over.

The numerator: The total for the year of the monthly numbers of residents of the best value authority experiencing a delayed transfer of care on the monthly census date due to reasons included in categories 1 and 2 (Delayed for Social Care Reasons) in best value authority validated NHS Trust reports to the National Assembly for Wales.

The denominator: Population of the best value authority aged 75 or over (000's).

NAWPI 3.9The percentage of adult clients receiving a written statement of their needs and how they will be met.

The percentage of clients aged 18 or over assessed or reviewed in the financial year who have received a copy of their care plan. RAP definition:

The numerator: 100 * the sum of the two boxes “number of clients or carers given or offered a copy of their care plan” for assessments and reviews on form A3.

The denominator: the sum of the two boxes “Total number of clients for whom a new or revised care plan was produced” for assessments and reviews on form A3.

NAWPI 3.10The rate of assessments of people aged 65 and over per 1000 population aged 65 or over.

The numerator: Total number of clients aged 65 or over with assessments which were completed or terminated in the financial year. Exclude clients whose assessment is still on going on 31st March, who will be counted in the following year.

RAP definition: Form A1 pages 1 and 2 total of clients aged 65 or over.

AS definition:The total number of clients for whom assessments were counted on form AS1 (Quarterly Enquiry on Social Services) row 1.1, column 6.

The denominator: Population of the best value authority aged 65 or over (000's)

NAWPI 3.11The number of nights of respite care provided or funded by the best value authority per 1,000 population aged 18 or over.

The numerator: The number of nights of respite care provided for clients aged over 18. Respite care is short-term overnight care whereby adults assessed as being in need of care, who are normally dependent on other members of their household for at least some aspects of their personal care and support, are cared for in their own home by a substitute carer or in a place other than their own home. The period of care should cover at least one night. If for any client the period of care exceeds 3 months, include them in the count, but specify the number of clients involved in a note.

The denominator: Population of the best value authority.

RAP definition:

Include nights of respite care provided to clients counted on the following return:

Form P2f sum of pages 1 and 3 row “Total of above” column “Overnight respite care – clients home” plus column “Overnight respite care – not clients home”.

NAWPI 3.12The percentage of children on the child protection register (“CPR”) whose cases were reviewed

This is to be calculated using the expression (A/B) * 100 where:

A

=

Children on the Child Protection Register (“CPR”) at the end of the financial year, have been on the CPR for at least the previous 6 months, and whose case has been reviewed at least every six months.

B

=

Children on the CPR at the end of the financial year for at least the previous 6 months.

A review means considering the child safety, health and development against the intended outcome set out in the child protection plan and should be recorded in writing.

Article 4

SCHEDULE 4HOUSING INDICATORS

Indicator NumberDescription of indicatorDetails of indicator
Note: For the purpose of the best value housing performance indicators, a dwelling is defined as a building, or part of a building which forms a separate, or reasonably separate and self contained, set of premises designed to be occupied by a single household.
NAWPI 4.1

The proportion of private sector dwellings where direct action by the best value authority has resulted in:

(a)

unfit dwellings being made fit or demolished

(b)

return to occupation during a financial year where they have been vacant for more than 6 months at the beginning of the financial year

(a)The number of unfit private sector dwellings made fit or demolished per annum as a direct result of action by the best value authority expressed as a proportion of the total number of private sector dwellings judged by the authority to be unfit . A best value authority should include any dwelling removed from the number of unfit dwellings following direct action of the best value authority by:

  • giving grants

  • giving loans and loan indemnities

  • action to promote good maintenance: provision of repair services; providing advice demolition and clearance

  • group repair schemes

  • enforcement: repair notices, deferred action or closure

  • sponsorship of Care and Repair/Home

  • Improvement Agency providing advice and repair services

The numerator should measure the annual number of properties that have been made fit or demolished following one of the above actions.

The denominator should be available from a condition survey of the private sector and should measure the number of dwellings judged unfit at the time of the survey and should not be amended until the next condition survey is carried out (it should not therefore be adjusted for dwellings becoming unfit, for dwellings that subsequently come to the best value authority’s attention as unfit or for dwellings made fit).

(b)

The number of private sector dwellings that have been vacant for more than 6 months at the beginning of the financial year that are returned into occupation during the financial year as a direct result of action by the best value authority (the numerator), divided by the number of all private sector properties that have been vacant for more than 6 months at the beginning of the financial year (the denominator), multiplied by 100.

A best value authority should include any dwelling which becomes occupied following direct action of the authority by:

  • grants, loans or other financial assistance either provided or facilitated by the authority.

  • advice to owner to cover one or more of the following—

    • literature provided on the best value authority’s empty home strategy

    • advice on letting, including legal and housing benefit requirements

    • advice on grants and other financial assistance, including tax concessions available

    • details of landlord forum or accreditation scheme

    • advice on repairs, including details on building contractors meeting minimum standards

  • referral to partner registered social landlord or other intermediary with relevant expertise

  • enforcement action, including repair notices, compulsory purchase orders, works in default, enforced sale enquiries made to establish ownership of properties and follow up action

  • enquiries made to establish ownership of property

The numerator measures the number of these dwellings which were then returned to occupation following one of the above actions during the financial year.

The denominator is the number of dwellings that have been vacant for 6 months from the beginning of the financial year rather than any property that was empty for 6 months during the financial year.

NAWPI 4.2Energy Efficiency – the average SAP rating of best value authority owned dwellings

The average Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) rating of the best value authority owned dwellings.

The average annual change in average SAP rating of best value authority owned dwellings, where the SAP is an index of the annual cost of heating a dwelling to achieve a standard heating regime and is normally described as running from 1 (highly inefficient) to 100 (highly efficient). It is a measure of overall energy efficiency and is dependent on both the heat loss from the dwelling and the performance of the heating system.

The performance indicators require an energy survey to be conducted to set the baseline position. Surveys should be carried out on at least a 5 yearly interval basis. In years when no energy survey is conducted best value authorities should update their survey information to take into account work done to the stock over the period.

NAWPI 4.4The average weekly costs of housing management per best value authority dwellingThis covers the financial cost to the best value authority for housing management – measured by the Housing Revenue Account (“HRA”) actual expenditure on management in the financial year divided by the average number of dwellings in the HRA at the start and end of the year, divided by 52. The information should match that in the relevant Housing Revenue Account Subsidy (HRAS) Annual Return form for general and special management costs (cells 3000 and 3010).
NAWPI 4.5

Best value authority rent collection and arrears:

(a)

proportion of rent collected

(b)

rent arrears of current tenants as a proportion of the best value authority’s rent roll

(c)

rent written off as not collectable as a proportion of the best value authority’s rent roll.

(d)

The proportion of rent collected is calculated from the data on the gross HRA rent collected during the year (i.e. including that met through Housing Benefit) as a proportion of the total HRA rent available for collection in the year but with rent arrears from former tenants accrued before the financial year end excluded (i.e. the latest potential rent income after allowing for vacant dwellings and including arrears of current tenants outstanding at the beginning of the financial year). The rent collected is the total amount of rent collected during the year, less any payments of arrears for earlier years from former tenants.

(e)

Rent arrears of current tenants as a proportion of the best value authority’s rental income – Arrears as a proportion of rent roll is calculated from the total amount of tenants HRA rent outstanding at the end of the financial year and the total HRA rent roll. Rent roll is the total amount of potential rent collectable for the financial year for all dwellings owned by the best value authority, whether occupied or not. The total amount of rent arrears is the amount of arrears of both former and current tenants at the end of the financial year.

(c)Rent written off as not collectable as a proportion of the best value authority’s rental income – Write offs as a proportion of rent roll is calculated from the total amount of HRA rent written off during the financial year and the total HRA rent roll. Rent roll is the total amount of potential rent collectable for the financial year for all dwellings owned by the best value authority, whether occupied or not. The total amount of write-offs is the amount of current and former tenants rent arrears formally written off as unrecoverable during the financial year.

NAWPI 4.6Proportion of homelessness applications on which the best value authority makes a decision and issues written notification to the applicant within 33 working days

The number of homeless applications (under section 184 of the Housing Act 1996, (1996 c. 52)) upon which a decision was made and written notification was issued (under section 184) to the applicant within 33 working days, as a proportion of all homeless applications where a decision is made and written notification issued (under section 184).

This applies to all homelessness applications, including those from asylum seekers, where a section 184 notice has been issued. For asylum seeker cases, best value authorities do not need to wait for a Home Office decision on the asylum claim before issuing a section 184 notice, if they are satisfied that a homelessness duty is owed.

NAWPI 4.7Average relet times for best value authority dwellings let in the previous financial year

This indicator is calculated from data on the total number of lettings made during the year (excluding those let after major repairs) and the total number of days these dwellings were vacant. The total number of lettings covers all lettings (excluding mutual exchanges) made during the financial year where there was no major repair work financed from the best value authority’s capital programme carried out in the period that the dwelling is vacated (major repair works are defined as those costing £2,000 or more).

A dwelling that has become vacant and then undergoes capital work while empty, and the work is of a type that would normally be done with the tenant remaining in residence, should not be counted as property undergoing major repair.

Days a dwelling is vacant means the number of calendar days between a property becoming void and being re-let. This includes the day the property became void up to and including the day before the new tenancy start date from which rent is payable.

Major capital repairs financed through revenue count as major repairs for the purposes of this indicator.

NAWPI 4.8Effectiveness of the Social Housing System:

(a)proportion of properties vacant (voids)

(b)the average number of homeless households in temporary accommodation during the financial year bed and breakfast accommodation

a)The numerator is the average number of vacant homes throughout the financial year that are available for letting or awaiting/undergoing minor repairs (that is excluding properties awaiting demolition or awaiting/undergoing major repair work).

The denominator is the average number if homes under management throughout the financial year, excluding properties awaiting demolition or awaiting/undergoing major repair work.

Major repair (or improvement) works are defined as those costing £2,000 or more per dwelling .

The average through the year is defined as the average of the results for the end of four quarters for the financial year.

b)

The number of homeless households in bed and breakfast accommodation is shown on form WHO 12 (Homelessness) (Revised 3/01): Section 6 Line h: “Total” column less “S.193 duty being discharged” column.

The average through the year is the average of the results for the end of the four quarters for the financial year taken from the WHO 12.

NAWPI 4.9

The number of best value authority dwellings needing major repair or improvement works at 1 April and the proportion of these dwellings receiving such works during the financial year

a)

£500 and £5,000

b)

works costing over £5,000

a)The best value authority’s assessment of the number of its owned dwellings requiring major repair or improvement works (costing between £500 and £5,000) at 1 April in the previous year and the number of dwellings that actually received such works during the previous financial year expressed as a percentage of those requiring such works at 1 April in the previous financial year.

b)The best value authority’s assessment of the number of its owned dwellings requiring major repair or improvement works (costing over £5,000) at 1 previous financial year expressed as a percentage works costing between April in the previous year and the number of dwellings that actually received such works during the of those requiring such works at 1 April in the previous year.

Properties identified for demolition or conversion should be excluded from this indicator. Major repair and improvement works, for the purposes of this indicator, would apply to repair and improvement works costing over £500 regardless of whether revenue or capital funded.

Best value authorities are advised to carry out local stock condition surveys every 5 years, covering all tenures. Authorities should use these to estimate the work required at 1 April in the previous year.

NAWPI 4.10

Percentage of repairs completed within target time

a)

Classed as emergency

b)

Classed as urgent

a)For emergency repairs completed during the previous financial year. A repair should be defined as an emergency repair where there is: a danger to tenants' health; or a risk to the safety of tenants; or a risk of serious damage to buildings; or a risk of loss or serious damage to tenants' property, including loss by theft. The target time for completion should be specified where it differs from 24 hours. The time taken to complete the repair is defined as the time elapsing between the time at which the repair is brought to the best value authority’s attention, and the time at which the works are satisfactorily completed.

b)For urgent repairs completed during the previous financial year. A repair should be defined as an urgent repair where tenants, comfort or convenience is seriously affected; or the disrepair will cause the occupant to incur expense. The target time for completion should be specified where it differs from 7 calendar days, stating whether measured in calendar or working days. The time taken to complete the repair is defined as the time elapsing between the date at which the repair is brought to the best value authority’s attention, and the date at which the works are satisfactorily completed. For example, if a repair request was received on a Wednesday and works completed on Tuesday of the following week, the number of days elapsing would be (Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday) 6 calendar, or 4 working days.

For examples of emergency or urgent repairs see the Secure Tenants of Local Housing Authorities (Right to Repair ) Regulations 1994 (S.I. 1994/133).

NAWPI 4.11The average time taken to complete non-urgent responsive repairsFor non-urgent responsive repairs completed during the previous financial year, the average number of (calendar) days between the non-urgent responsive repair being requested and its satisfactory completion. A repair should be defined as non urgent repair where it does not fall into the emergency or urgent category, and where it has not been incorporated into a programme of planned maintenance.
NAWPI 4.12Whether or not the best value authority follow the Commission for Racial Equality’s code of practice in renting housingFollowing the code means adherence to all the codes recommendations except those relating to employment practices, including procedures for dealing with racial harrassment and reporting the results of ethnic monitoring to a committee of the best value authority.

Article 4

SCHEDULE 5ENVIRONMENT INDICATORS

Indicator NumberDescription indicatorDetails of Indicator
NAWPI 5.1

Total tonnage of municipal waste arisings –

(a)

percentage recycled

(b)

percentage composted

(c)

percentage used to recover heat, power and other enery sources

(d)

percentage landfilled

“Municipal Waste” means, all waste collected by best value authorities under section 45(1) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 (1990 c. 43), plus all waste arisings from Civic Amenity Sites and waste collected by third parties for which collection or disposal recycling credits are paid under Section 52 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990.

“Civic Amenity Site” means places provided by the best value authority at which persons resident in the area may deposit their household waste (Services provided under Section 51(1)(b) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990).

For the avoidance of doubt, all waste collected by best value authorities shall include waste arising from.

  • waste collection rounds (including separate rounds for collection for recyclables)

  • street cleansing and litter collection

  • beach cleansing

  • bulky waste collections

  • hazardous household waste collections

  • household clinical waste collections

  • garden waste collections

  • drop–off/bring systems

  • clearance of fly–tipped wastes

  • weekend skip services

  • rubble

  • abandoned vehicles

  • any other household waste collected by the best value authority

(a)

“Recycled” means, household waste materials which have been collected and separated from municipal waste with subsequent processing to produce marketable products. Recycling differs from product re-use because of the need to process the recovered material.

For the calculation of the percentage of waste recycled, beach cleansing waste, rubble and abandoned vehicles should be excluded from the total of waste collected.

The percentage recycled should be calculated as (X − W)/(Y − Z) * 100, where

W

=

tonnage of beach cleansing waste rubble and abandoned vehicles recycled by the best value authority (including private/voluntary collections of waste for recycling).

X

=

tonnage of waste recycled by the best value authority (including private/voluntary collections of waste for recycling

Y

=

total tonnage of waste collected by the best value authority including civic amenity sites (and including private/voluntary collections of household waste for recycling) and

Z

=

total tonnage of beach cleansing waste, rubble and abandoned vehicles.

(b)

“Composted” means the composting of source segregated biodegradable municipal wastes to produce a stable product fit for use as a soil conditioner and which are diverted from landfill.

(c)

“Used to recover heat, power and other energy sources” means

  • the controlled combustion of waste in specialised plant specifically to generate power and/or heat from the waste feedstock

  • the controlled combustion of refuse derived fuel in specialised plant specifically to generate power and/or heat from the waste feedstock

  • the production of gaseous fuels by reacting hot carbonaceous waste with air, steam or oxygen (gasification)

  • the thermal decomposition of organic waste to produce gaseous, liquid and solid products by pyrolysis.

  • the biological degradation of organic wastes by anaerobic digestion.

The following shall not be included

  • ash residues subsequently landfilled or recycled

  • methane recovery from landfill

  • material recovered for recycling following incineration of waste.

(d)

“Landfilled” means waste deposited on, or on structure set into, the surface of the land; or under the surface of the land (land includes land covered by water which is above the low water mark or ordinary spring tides).

NAWPI 5.5The percentage of highways and relevant land inspected of a high or acceptable standard of cleanliness

“High or acceptable standard of cleanliness” is defined as achieving grades A or B of the Code of Practice on Litter and Refuse (1999)

For the definition of “relevant land” see section 86 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 (1990 c. 43).

“Inspected” means inspected using the methodology specified below.

Street cleaning inspections:

1  Inspections must be carried out or arranged by the street-cleansing client.

2  Survey should cover streets in zones 1, 2 and 3 (from the Code of Practice on Litter and Refuse).

3  At least 2% of streets should be inspected every two months. This sample may cover the same streets in different months (i.e. the samples can overlap), or may even involve two inspections at different points on the same street within the same month, where this is thought to be appropriate for longer or busier streets. But the number of inspections should be equivalent to 2% of the total number of streets in the best value authority.

4  The sample programme must be representative of the whole authority best value in terms of the location of the streets and the balance of streets in each zone. Inspections should be carried out at random times – this excludes monitoring carried out after cleansing solely for the purpose of monitoring a street-cleansing contract. However, random monitoring of an output— based contract would be acceptable.

  • “An inspection” is a visual examination of a length of street against the photographic standards in the Code of Practice for Litter and Refuse.

  • Where best value authorities target their inspections on known “dirty” areas, they should adjust their results so they reflect the overall balance of streets in their area (for example, if they do five times as many inspections in “dirty” areas as they do in other areas, they should calculate the overall result for the authority by “de-weighting” results from those areas).

NAWPI 5.6Number of collections missed per 100,000 collections of household waste

“Missed collection” means

  • any collection reported by a resident / commercial organisation where the resident was not informed in writing of a change in the arrangements

  • any collection which is known by the best value authority not to have taken place on the prescribed day due to a failure of the best value authority or its contractor including those missed due to weather conditions or industrial action

  • any collection which did not take place on the prescribed day where residents were not informed in writing of the changed arrangements

“Prescribed day” means the day of the week on which collections would normally take place

“Informed in writing” means by printed refuse sacks, leaflets, newspapers or any other written communication provided to all relevant households / businesses by the best value authority or its contractors.

Calculate as

X

=

number of missed collections (including separate collections of recyclables)

Y

=

the number of properties as listed in the Valuation Office’s Schedule of Alterations, page entitled “Statement of Numbers and Bands of All Properties Shown in the Valuation List for the Billing Authority Area”, “Grand Total Line”. Use the last statement received before 1 April in the financial year.

Z

=

the number of scheduled times bins are collected in the period

NAWPI 5.7Percentage of population served by a kerbside collection of recyclables“Population” means the population of the best value authority area.

Article 4

SCHEDULE 6TRANSPORT INDICATORS

Indicator NumberDescription of indicatorDetails of indicator
NAWPI 6.1Cost of highway maintenance per km travelled by a vehicle on principal roadsFigure in memorandum box M2 of the most recent Capital Outturn form COR1 plus lines 2 (structural maintenance) and 4 (routine maintenance) of the most recent Revenue Outturn form RO2 column 7; divided by the figure for vehicle kilometrage derived from Table A of the most recent Revenue Support Grant settlement.
NAWPI 6.2Cost per passenger journey of subsidised bus servicesNet expenditure (Form RO2 line 11) on subsidy of local bus services, as defined in Section 2 of the Transport Act 1985 (1985 c. 67), in the financial year divided by the number of passenger journeys on those services in that year. This should exclude expenditure on concessionary fare schemes under sections 93 to 105 of the Transport Act 1985 (1985 c. 67).
NAWPI 6.3

Road conditions:

(a)

condition of principal roads

(b)

condition of non principal roads

a)Either:

A visual survey of all principal road length in the year using a Coarse Visual Inspection (CVI) Survey (a survey which records road defects identified visually). The survey will be carried out under the United Kingdom Pavement Management System (UKPMS) Rules and Parameters, version 2.0. The survey will cover the whole network apart from the part nominated for “deemed coverage” – this must be limited to 30% of the authority’s principal road network. Best value authorities will be requested to indicate percentage of network with a UKPMS defects score of 70 or higher

Or:

Percentage of the network with negative residual life, derived from deflectograph surveys (mechanised surveys using equipment which assesses structural condition of the road by measuring deflection under load).

Indicator: Percentage of eligible principal road network at 1 July in the previous financial year with negative residual life.

b)

Unclassified roads are to be excluded from this indicator.

NAWPI 6.4Percentage of street lamps not working

Percentage of street lamps not working. Calculated as:

{(W * Y)/Z} * 100, where

W is the total number of streetlight failures detected in a year by regular inspections and other reports divided by 365.

Y is the average time taken to repair a streetlight following detection plus half the average time between inspections.

Z is the total number of street lights in the best value authority.

“Regular Inspections” are inspections undertaken by the best value authority or its agents at least four times a year. If a best value authority inspects its lights at different frequencies then it should work out the percentage for each frequency using the formula above and then combine the percentages into a weighted average.

NAWPI 6.5Road safety

Number of road accident casualties per 100,000 population broken down by (i) nature of casualties and (ii) road user type

Casualty categories: (a) killed/seriously injured; (b) slight injuries.

Road user types: (a) pedestrians, (b) pedal cyclists, (c) two-wheeled motor vehicle users, (d) car users and (e) other vehicle users.

Data will relate to the calendar year ending 15 months prior to the end of the previous financial year.

NAWPI 6.6Number of days of temporary traffic controls or road closure on traffic sensitive roads caused by best value authority road works per km of traffic sensitive road.

The total number of days temporary traffic controls (manual or by traffic lights) were in place on traffic sensitive roads or the road was closed, due to best value authority road works per km of traffic sensitive roads. (Exclude traffic controls at road works that were completed in less than a day).

“Traffic Sensitive” is as defined in Regulation 13 of the Streetworks (Registers, Notices, Directions and Designations) Regulations 1992 (S.I. 1992/2985).

NAWPI 6.8Damage to roads and pavementsTotal number of reported incidents of dangerous damage to roads and pavements repaired or made safe within 24 hours from the time that the best value authority first became aware of the damage, as a percentage of such incidents.
NAWPI 6.9The percentage of pedestrian crossings with facilities for disabled people

Pedestrian crossings means zebra, pelican, puffing toucan crossings, and traffic lights with a pedestrian phase. All crossings at a set of traffic lights or at a roundabout should be counted as one crossing. All crossings at one large roundabout with a series of mini roundabouts should likewise be counted as one crossing.

To qualify as having facilities for disabled people, all the approaches to the crossing should have dropped or flushed curbs and tactile surfaces, and in the case of pelican crossings and traffic lights and audible or tactile indicator that it is safe to cross the road.

NAWPI 6.10The percentage of total length of footpaths and other rights if way which are easy to use by members of the public.

The indicator is the total length of rights of way, which are easy to use, as a percentage of the total length of all rights of way. Rights of way appear on the definitive map of public rights of way for the best value authority area and are numbered. “Easy to use” means:

a)

being signposted or waymarked where they leave the road in accordance with the best value authority’s duty under s.27 of the Countryside Act 1968 (1968 c. 41) and to the extent necessary to allow users to follow the path (a public right of way wholly within a built up area and with a hard surface provided along its complete length and with a clearly defined route may be excluded from measurement);

b)

being free from unlawful obstructions or other interference, (including overhanging vegetation) to the public’s right of passage; and

c)

having surface and lawful barriers (eg stiles, gates) in good repair and to a standard necessary to enable the public to use the way without undue inconvenience.

Surveys to assess “easy to use” should be based on a minimum 5% random sample of lengths of paths in the financial year. The methodology recommended by the Countryside Council for Wales for its “Community Path Survey on the mid 1990's” is appropriate for assessing this indicator.

Paths should be easy to use by the category of user entitled to use the path (eg footpaths should be useable by walkers, bridleways by horse riders).

Article 4

SCHEDULE 7PLANNING INDICATORS

Indicator NumberDescription of indicatorDetails of indicator
NAWPI 7.1Development plans:

(a)does the best value authority have an unitary development plan in place?

if no go to (b) and (c)

(b)

does the best value authority have a deposit unitary development plan in place?

(c)

what percentage of the best value authority population is covered by local plans which were adopted in the last 5 years?

Unitary Development Plan: Statutory plan produced by best value authorities covering both strategic policies for an area and a written statement of detailed land use policies and justification accompanied by a proposals map showing the policies on a geographical base. When adopted, these plans replace structure and local plans in force in the area.

Deposit :The stage at which the statutory plan is formally made available for public inspection and the submission of objections and representations.

Local Plan: Statutory plan which sets out the authority’s detailed policies and specific proposals for the development and use of land in its area.

Adopted: Final version of the development plan adopted by the best value authority.

NAWPI 7.3The number of advertised departures from the statutory plan as a percentage of total permissions granted.The number of permissions granted where the application was advertised under the provisions of Article 8(2)(b) of the Town and Country Planning (General Development Procedure) Order 1995 (S.I. 1995/419) as a percentage of total decisions made.
NAWPI 7.4Percentage of total applications determined within 8 weeksAs National Assembly for Wales Development Control Quarterly Survey. In setting local targets best value authorities should have regard to the national target of 80% in 8 weeks.
NAWPI 7.6Quality in customer service (Planning Officers Society Wales checklist).

This indicator uses the Customer Service Checklist currently being piloted by the Planning Officers' Society for Wales.

Number of quality indicators achieved expressed as a ratio of total quality indicators e.g. if the total equals10 a best value authority achieving 5 of the indicators would score 5/10.

Quality indicators are:

  • Member and Officer training.

  • An adopted Complaints Procedure.

  • Reception areas accessible to disabled people.

  • A user charter/service plan detailing service commitments.

  • A survey of user views during the last 3 years.

  • Regular published performance plans. (Regular means at least once every 12 months).

  • Targets set for responding to correspondence.

  • Summary of key public documents available in large print and/or Braille.

  • Public documents available in Welsh and English (on request).

  • Delegation of 70% or more planning applications to Officers.

  • Public documents available on the Internet

NAWPI 7.7The percentage of standard searches carried out in 10 working days

“Standard Search” means the statutory land search defined in form LLC1 together with the standard search as prescribed in the Law Society’s code of practice in form CON 29, part 1 (“Standard Enquiries”).

Include all of the above searches not only ones relating to householders, and classes of searches if any where different standard search fees are charged (except where there is an extra charge in return for enhanced service).

Article 4

SCHEDULE 8ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND TRADING STANDARDS INDICATORS

Indicator NumberDescription of indicatorDetails of indicator
NAWPI 8.1

The percentage of food premises inspections that should have been carried out that were carried out for:

(a)

high risk premises

(b)

other premises

Inspections due means the inspections of relevant premises due during the year as per the minimum number of inspections for those premises that should have been carried out for food hygiene purposes in accordance with COP9.

Inspection is defined in the Food Safety Act 1990 code of practice no. 3 paragraph 2 (excluding section (f)).

“COP9” below refers to the Food Safety Act 1990 (1990 c. 16), Code of Practice no. 9

“Food premises” means all categories as defined in annex (1) of COP9

“High risk premises” means premises in risk categories (a) to (c) in COP9

“Other premises” means premises in risk categories (d) to (f) in COP9.

NAWPI 8.2/BV 166Score against the checklist of enforcement best practice for environmental health/trading standards.

The proposed checklist below is drafted with 10 points, with one or more question per point. Each point is worth 1 mark. The question(s) under each point are worth a fraction of that mark. Each question requires a “Yes” or “No” answer. For example, there are eight questions under point 1, so a “Yes” answer to one question under point 1 attracts a score of 1/8th, and a “Yes” answer to five questions attracts a score of 5/8th.

Written Enforcement Policies

1.

 a)Does the best value authority have written published enforcement policy/policies, formally endorsed by its members that cover all aspects of environmental health and trading standards enforcement?

b)Is non-compliance with statutory requirements followed up in accordance with the enforcement policy/policies?

c)Do the policy/policies confirm that the best value authority has signed the Enforcement Concordat?

d)Do the policy/policies take in to account the guidance set out in “The Code for Crown Prosecutors”?

e)Do the policy/policies include the criteria to be met before formal enforcement by the best value authority?

f)Do the policy/policies make provision for situations where there is a shared enforcement role?

g)Do the policy/policies make provision for the particular interests of consumers within the best value authority’s area including business owners, employees and the public?

h)Are the policy/policies mentioned above followed, monitored, and reported on, and any variations addressed within the service plan or Best Value Performance Plan (BVPP)?

Planned enforcement activity

2.  Does the best value authority have risk— based inspection programmes, and sampling and surveillance regimes for regulatory services that:

a)meet legal requirements;

b)otherwise have regard to official guidance;

c)otherwise have regard to other appropriate professional guidance and standards?

The best value authority must be able to demonstrate that it regularly reviews its interpretation and application of legislation and guidance. For example, in the trading standards area, it should carry out an annual comparison of the proportion of its trading premises that it has classified as having “high”, “medium” or “low” inspectable risk with the figures for other authorities. It should then carry out process benchmarking with other authorities if these proportions differ significantly form the average, e.g. if the authority’s figures are in the upper or lower decile.

3.  Are the programmes and regimes mentioned above in Point 2 followed, monitored, and reported on, and any variations addressed within a service plan or BVPP?

4.  Does the best value authority have targeted educational and information programmes?

5.  Are the programmes mentioned in Point 4 followed, monitored, and reported on, and any deviations from the planned programmes addressed within a service plan or BVPP?

Reactive and responsive enforcement activity

6.  Does the best value authority have and implement policies, procedures, and standards for:

a)responding to and dealing with complaints made to the best value authority about a third party and requests for services regarding statutory enforcement functions

b)supporting the provision of consumer advice, including participation in a Consumer Support Network?

7.  Does the best value authority have and implement policies, procedures and standards for responding to and dealing with:

a)statutory notifications

b)the referral to other regulators of relevant information received where there is wider regulatory interest?

8.  Are the policies, procedures and standards mentioned above in Points 6 and 7 followed, monitored, and reported on, and any variations addressed within the service plan or BVPP?

Appropriate Resources

9.  Has the best value authority within the last five years benchmarked its resources for relevant services against similar best value authorities or comparable service providers including private and voluntary?

Consultation and satisfaction levels

10.—a) Does the best value authority have a range of mechanisms in place to consult stakeholders affected by their service regarding the development of the enforcement policy?

b)Does the best value authority have a range of mechanisms in place to consult stakeholders affected by their service regarding satisfaction levels?

c)and are the consultation responses considered and acted upon?

Article 4

SCHEDULE 9CULTURE INDICATORS

Indicator NumberDescription of indicatorDetails of indicator
NAWPI 9.1Number of pupils visiting museums and galleries in organised school groups

Only museums/galleries that meet the Museums Association (“MA”) definition (The Museums Association Code of Ethics – 3rd Edition 1999) should be counted and where a museum is run by the best value authority, or the best value authority contributes at least 20% of the running costs, net of charges, or provides the building.

The MA definition is: “Museums enable people to explore collections for inspiration, learning and enjoyment. They are institutions that collect, safeguard and make accessible artefacts and specimens which they hold in trust for society.”

An “organised” school group is one pre-booked with the museum/gallery.

NAWPI 9.2The number of physical visits to public libraries.An estimate of the total number of visits by members of the public to libraries for whatever purpose during the financial year. This is based on a one week sample during the year using the definitions and procedure set out in the Chartered Institute for Public Finance and Accountancy’s (“CIPFA”) “Public Library Statistics 1998/99 Actuals (SIS Ref: 84.00) note on page 98, questionnaire reference line 124 for visits” (ISSN 0260 4078), or using a more accurate method of estimation. Best value authorities may, if they wish, base their figures on a larger statistical sample than the one suggested by CIPFA.
NAWPI 9.3

Swimming pools and sports centres:

  • the number of swims and other visits per 1,000 population.

Swims and other visits means the best value authorities best estimate of the number of admissions of people to use facilities at pools and sport centres, including schools and other groups but excluding spectators, divided by its population and multiplied by 1,000.
NAWPI 9.4

Playgrounds:

(a)

the number of playgrounds and play areas provided by the best value authority, per 1,000 children under the age of 12 in the best value authority area

(b)

the percentage of these which:

(i)

conform to national standards for local unequipped play areas

(ii)

conform to national standards for local equipped play areas

(iii)

conform to national standards for larger neighbourhood equipped play area

A playground means an area formally designated by the best value authority for childrens play and open to the public.

The standards referred to in Part (b)(i) means that those playgrounds reaching the National Playing Fields Association (“NPFA”) “local area for play” standard, as defined in box 2.

The standards referred to in Part (b)(ii) means those playgrounds reaching NPFA “local equipped area for play” standard as defined in box 2.

The standards referred to in Part (b)(iii) means those playgrounds reaching NPFA “neighbourhood equipped area for play” standard as defined in box 2.

Article 4

SCHEDULE 10NATIONAL PARKS AUTHORITY CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

Indicator NumberDescription indicatorDetails of Indicator
NAWPI 10.1The level of compliance with the best value authority approved Welsh language scheme as reported to the Welsh Language Board

The overall level of compliance with the best value authority’s approved Welsh language scheme as confirmed by the Welsh Language Board as follows:

Service delivery: very good good fair poor

Scheme management: very good good fair poor

to which “and/but improving” or “and/but deteriorating” is added to the performance level where appropriate.

NAWPI 10.2The level of the Commission for Racial Equality’s standard for local government to which the best value authority conforms

The levels of the standard for local government are defined in the chapter entitled “Measurements” in the Commission for Racial Equality’s documents entitled “Auditing for Equality” and “Racial Equality means Quality”. Best value authorities should report the level they have reached as follows:—

  • Level 1: The best value authority has written a racial policy statement.

  • Level 2: The best value authority has an action plan for monitoring and achieving its racial equality policy.

  • Level 3: Results of ethnic monitoring against the equality policy and level of consultations with local communities are used to review the overall policy of the best value authority.

  • Level 4: The best value authority’s force can demonstrate clear improvements in its services resulting from monitoring, consulting with local communities, and acting on its equal opportunities policy.

  • Level 5: The best value authority is an example of best practice in the way that it monitors and provides services to ethnic minorities, and is helping other authorities to achieve high standards. Confirmation that the best value authority has reached this level must have been provided by the Commission for Racial Equality.

To report these levels, a best value authority must have adopted the Commission for Racial Equality’s standard for local government. If the best value authority has not adopted this standard, it should report the following:

“This authority has not adopted the Commission for Racial Equality standard for local government”

NAWPI 10.3The number of complaints to an Ombudsman classified as maladministrationNumber of cases recorded and reported to authorities by the Commission for Local Administration in Wales classified as “maladministration causing injustice” or “maladministration”.
NAWPI 10.4The percentage of undisputed invoices which were paid by the best value authority within 30 days of such invoices being received by the best value authority.

To obtain this percentage the best value authority will need to divide the number of all the invoices for commercial goods and services paid to external contractors and suppliers within 30 days of receipt during the financial year, by the total of all invoices paid by the best value authority in that year, and multiplying the result by 100.

In this indicator, and for the purposes of ascertaining whether the best value authority has paid the invoice within the 30 days period, the period will commence at the time of receipt of the invoice by the best value authority (not the authority’s payment section). The best value authority shall then pay such invoice within 30 days. Payment includes—

  • dispatch of a cheque or other payment instrument;

  • notification to bank for Bankers Automated Clearing Service payments; or

  • bank processing of the payment if the best value authority specifies a period after which the bank is to make the payments once it has received the Bankers Automated Clearing Service (BACS) tape.

Where the best value authority does not record the date it receives the invoice it should add two days to the date of the invoice unless it has sampled invoices during that year to get a more accurate period to add to that date.

If sampling is used, the sample should be broadly representative of all invoices received by different departments and at different times of the year, and consist of at least 500 invoices.

If an invoice is received before the services have been provided or the goods received, the 30 day or agreed term period starts from the satisfactory receipt of goods or the satisfactory completion of the services.

NAWPI 10.5The number of working days or shifts per full time equivalent lost due to sickness absence.

The proportion of days or shifts lost due to sickness absence will be obtained by the authority calculating the numerator and denominator as defined below.

“Working days or shifts” means days or shifts scheduled for work after holidays or leave days have been excluded.

The numerator is defined as the aggregate of working days lost due to sickness absence irrespective of whether this is self certified, certified by a GP or long term. This will include the days lost due to sickness of all permanent best value authority employees. However, for the purposes of this numerator, the days lost due to sickness of temporary or agency staff should be disregarded. In addition, the days lost by staff on maternity or paternity leave should also be disregarded.

The denominator is defined as the average number of Full Time Equivalent (FTE) staff employed by the authority within a financial year. For staff who work part time, the authority should calculate the FTE equivalent for both the numerator and denominator on a consistent basis

NAWPI 10.7Ill health retirements as a percentage of the total work force.“Ill health retirement” can occur at any age where an independent registered medical practitioner qualified in occupational health has certified that the employee is permanently incapable of performing the duties of that employment or a broadly comparable local government employment with his employing authority because of ill-health or infirmity of mind or body.
NAWPI 10.8The percentage of staff declaring that they meet the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 disability definition as a percentage of the best value authority’s workforce.

The Disability Discrimination Act 1995 (1995 1995 c. 50) states that “a person has a disability for the purposes of this Act if he has a physical or mental impairment which has a substantial and long-term adverse effect on his ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities.”

The indicator is calculated as follows: Number of disabled staff, divided by the total number of best value authority staff, multiplied by 100.

NAWPI 10.9The percentage of employees from minority ethnic communities within the best value authorities workforceThe best value authority will calculate this indicator by dividing the number of minority ethnic community staff in the best value authority by the total number of the best value authority staff. The result of this division will then be multiplied by 100.
NAWPI 10.10The percentage of interactions with the public, by type of transaction, which are capable of electronic service delivery which are being delivered using internet protocols or other paperless methods.

Interactions means any contact between the citizen and the best value authority including (by type):

  • Providing information

  • Collecting revenue

  • Providing benefits and grants

  • Consultation

  • Regulation (such as issuing licences)

  • Applications for services

  • Booking venues, resources and courses

  • Paying for goods and services

  • Providing access to community, professional or business networks and procurement

100% should be defined within the best value authority’s e-government strategy to take account of local circumstances based on the full list of services for the best value authority is responsible and the types of interactions relevant to each service.

This indicator presumes that all services are capable of being enabled for electronic delivery unless there is a legal or operational reason why this cannot be done.

“Electronic” means delivery through internet protocols and other Information and Communication Technology (ICT) methods and includes delivery by telephone if the transaction carried out is electronically enabled i.e. the officer receiving the call can access electronic information and/or update records on-line there and then.

NAWPI 10.11The percentage number of the best value authority’s buildings open to the public and that are suitable and accessible to disabled people

The percentage is to be calculated by dividing the number of buildings suitable and accessible to disabled people by the number of the buildings open to the public, multiplied by 100.

For the purpose of this indicator “buildings” means buildings from which the best value authority provides a service, of which at least a part is usually open to members of the public (but excluding public conveniences which are not integral to such buildings, and schools and educational establishments).

The meaning of “suitable and accessible to disabled people” is to be construed in accordance with Part M of Schedule 1 to the Building Regulations 2000 (S.I. 2000/2531).

Article 4

SCHEDULE 11HOUSING BENEFIT & COUNCIL TAX BENEFITINDICATORS

Indicator NumberDescription of indicatorDetails of indicator
Note: Definitions of terms and guidance on measuring performance against these indicators are set out in The Housing Benefit and Council Tax Benefit Management Information System Guide produced by the DSS.
NAWPI 11.1/BV76Security: Whether the best value authority has a written and proactive strategy for combating fraud and error which embraces specified initatives including those sponsored by the Department of Social Security, (“DSS”) which is communicated regularly to all staff.

This indicator will be satisfied where, by 31 March 2002, the best value authority has in place a written security strategy which commits it, as a minimum, to undertaking two of the following sets of activities and the initiatives specified in the strategy are observably in use:

i.

operating the Verification Framework and the external auditor has confirmed in the annual audit certificate that the best value authority is complying with the framework;

ii.

operating a policy for prosecution which details the circumstances in which cases would be considered for prosecution or for the application of other sanctions, and which is observably complied with,

iii.

operating at least 3 of the following initiatives which are observably in use: Royal Mail’s service to return re-directed benefit mail; the Housing Benefit Matching Services; a National Service Level Agreement with the Benefits Agency; a Fraud Service Level Agreement with the Benefits Agency.

The strategy will be judged to be regularly communicated to staff where all staff hold an up-to-date copy of the best value authority’s current strategy; and a copy of the strategy is issued to new staff and its use and purpose is explained to them as part of their induction.

NAWPI 11.2/BV77The average cost of handling a Housing Benefit or Council Tax Benefit claim, taking into account differences in the types of claim received.

This indicator is based on the costs which best value authorities report they incur to administer Housing Benefit and Council Tax Benefit. Information on these costs will be taken from the joint Department of Environment, Transport and the Regions (DETR) and National Assembly for Wales statistical inquiry General Fund Services Revenue Account returns (form R04). The relevant cells in the 1999/00 form were line 15, column (3) and line 17, column (3) .

In order to make reported costs more directly comparable, they will be weighted by caseload mix and claim characteristics and turnover using statistical data held by the DSS. This mirrors the approach currently used by the DSS in distinguishing direct grant administration subsidy to best value authorities and will help ensure that performance against the indicator reflects real differences in the costs incurred by best value authorities which stem from the number and characteristics of the claims they handle.

NAWPI 11.3/BV78a

Speed of processing:

a)

Average time for processing new claims

This indicator measures the average processing time taken across all new claims for which the date of determination is within the period being reported on. The time for each claim is measured from the date of receipt of the claim to the date of dull determination, i.e. the first determination that does not relate to a payment on account.
BV78b

Speed of processing:

b)

Average time for processing notifications of changes of circumstances

This indicator measures the average processing time taken across all written notifications of changes which require a re-determination for which the date of re— determination is within the period being reported on. The meaning of re-determination is limited to those cases where notifications affect the person’s right to benefit; or the amount of their benefit entitlement; or their right to receive payment of benefit.
BV78c

Speed of processing:

c)

Percentage of renewal claims processed on time

This indicator measures the number of renewal claims determined before the end of the existing benefit period as a percentage across all renewal claims for which the date of determination is within the period being reported on.
NAWPI 11.4/BV79a

Accuracy of processing:

a)

Percentage of cases for which the calculation of the amount of benefit due was correct on the basis of the information available for the determination for a sample of cases checked post-determination.

This indicator measures the percentage of cases within a random sample for which the calculation of benefit is found to be correct.

The sample size for each best value authority will be determined by the DSS based on the latest available caseload data. Further guidance on sample sizes and the random selection of cases can be found in Housing Benefit and Council Tax Benefit Circulars S1/2000 and S5/2000.

BV79b

Accuracy of processing:

b)

The percentage of recoverable overpayments (excluding Council Tax Benefit) that were recovered in the financial year.

This indicator measures the value of cash recovered during the period being reported on as a percentage of the value of recoverable overpayments identified by the best value authority on or after 1st April in the financial year.

Article 4

SCHEDULE 12CROSS CUTTING COMMUNITY SAFETY INDICATORS

Indicator NumberDescription of indicatorDetails of indicator
NAWPI 12.1/BV 126Domestic burglaries per 1000 households in the best value authority area“Domestic burglaries” relates to burglary in a dwelling and aggravated burglary in a dwelling.
NAWPI 12.2/BV 127Robberies per 1000 of the best value authority area population.
NAWPI 12.3/BV128Vehicle crimes per 1,000 of the population of the best value authority

“Vehicle crimes” include recorded theft/unauthorised taking of a motor vehicle, theft from a vehicle and aggravated taking of a motor vehicle. .

Vehicle interference is not included.

NAWPI 12.4/BV 173Has the best value authority established a corporate strategy to reduce crime and disorder in their area? Yes/no. If no, has the best value authority established a timetable for doing so?

In order to answer “yes” the best value authority must be able to answer “yes” to the following:

a)

Has the strategy been developed in consultation with local bodies, organisations and the local public?

b)

Is the strategy consistent with the Crime and Disorder Reduction Strategy and Policing Policy for the area?

c)

Has the best value authority developed Departmental Service Plans outlining targets on reducing crime and disorder which are consistent with the corporate strategy?

d)

Has the best value authority nominated officers in each Service Department responsible for achieving the targets on reducing crime and disorder?

e)

Has the best value authority determined milestones and built systems for monitoring and evaluating departmental targets and initiatives that have been developed to reduce crime and disorder?

f)

Has the best value authority developed an ongoing consultative process for assessing needs and demands in relation to crime and disorder reduction within the local community?

g)

Does the best value authority have a Community Safety Officer ?

NAWPI 12.5/BV 176The number of domestic violence refuge places per 10,000 of its population which are provided or supported by the best value authority.

Places means the number of rooms providing bedspaces. Rooms not normally used as bedrooms cannot be counted towards the total.Figures should reflect the situation as at 31 March in the previous financial year.

If the best value authority part funds an establishment then it can claim credit pro-rata to its contribution to the .facility’s running costs. Support can be financial or in kind. e.g. building or staff.

Refuge means emergency accommodation for those who have been referred for help having experienced threats to their physical safety at home (and including their children) and it must provide help, advice and advocacy support as well as being part of an integrated local approach involving partnership with other local and statutory bodies.

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