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The Air Navigation Order 2016

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Arts. 27(1)(b) & 32(2) & para. 3 of Schedule 1

SCHEDULE 4CLASSIFICATION AND MARKING OF AIRCRAFT

This schedule has no associated Explanatory Memorandum

PART 1Classification of aircraft

1.—(1) Aircraft are to be classified in accordance with the table.

Table

Column 1Column 2Column 3
(1) Lighter than air aircraft(a) Non-power driven(i) Free Balloon
(ii) Captive Balloon
(b) Power driven(i) Airship
(2) Heavier than air aircraft(a) Non-power driven(i) Glider
(ii) Kite
(b) Power driven flying machines(i) Aeroplane (Landplane)
(ii) Aeroplane (Seaplane)
(iii) Aeroplane (Amphibian)
(iv) Aeroplane (Self-launching Motor Glider)
(v) Powered Lift (Tilt Rotor)

(vi) Rotorcraft—

(aa) Helicopter;

(bb) Gyroplane.

(2) An aircraft which is intended to be operated with no pilot on board is to be further classified as unmanned.

(3) Unmanned aircraft include unmanned free balloons and remotely piloted aircraft.

PART 2Marking of aircraft

General

1.—(1) The nationality mark of the aircraft is the capital letter “G” in Roman character.

(2) The registration mark is a group of four capital letters in Roman character assigned by the CAA on the registration of the aircraft.

(3) The letters must be without ornamentation.

(4) A hyphen must be placed between the nationality mark and the registration mark.

(5) The nationality and registration marks must be displayed to the best advantage, taking into consideration the constructional features of the aircraft and must always be kept clean and visible.

(6) The letters constituting each group of marks must—

(a)be of equal height; and

(b)together with the hyphen, all be of the same single colour which must clearly contrast with the background on which they appear.

(7) The nationality and registration marks must also be inscribed on a fire-proof metal plate affixed in a prominent position—

(a)in the case of a microlight aeroplane, either on the fuselage or car or on the wing;

(b)in the case of a balloon, on the basket or envelope;

(c)in the case of a remotely piloted aircraft, secured in a prominent position near the main entrance or compartment, or affixed conspicuously to the exterior of the aircraft if there is no main entrance or compartment; or

(d)in the case of any other aircraft on the fuselage or car.

(8) The nationality and registration marks must be painted on the aircraft, or affixed to the aircraft by any other means ensuring a similar degree of permanence, in the manner specified in paragraphs 2, 3 and 4 of this Part.

Position and size of marks – heavier than air aircraft

2.—(1) The position and size of marks on heavier than air aircraft (excluding kites) must be as specified in this paragraph.

(2) On such aircraft having a fixed wing surface—

(a)the marks must appear on the lower horizontal surface of the wing structure and on the port wing unless they extend across the whole surface of both wings;

(b)so far as is possible the marks must be located equidistant from the leading and trailing edges of the wings;

(c)the tops of the letters must be towards the leading edge of the wing;

(d)the height of the letters must be—

(i)subject to sub-paragraph (ii), at least 50 centimetres;

(ii)if the wings are not large enough for the marks to be 50 centimetres in height, marks of the greatest height practicable in the circumstances.

(3) On the fuselage (or equivalent structure) and vertical tail surfaces of such aircraft—

(a)the marks must also appear either—

(i)on each side of the fuselage (or equivalent structure), and must, in the case of fixed wing aircraft be located between the wings and the horizontal tail surface; or

(ii)on the vertical tail surfaces;

(b)when located on a single vertical tail surface, the marks must appear on both sides;

(c)when located on multi-vertical tail surfaces, the marks must appear on the outboard sides of the outer-surfaces;

(d)subject to sub-paragraphs (f) and (g), the height of the letters constituting each group of marks must be at least 30 centimetres;

(e)if one of the surfaces authorised for displaying the required marks is large enough for those marks to be 30 centimetres in height (whilst complying with sub-paragraph (g)) and the other is not, marks of 30 centimetres in height must be placed on the largest authorised surface;

(f)if neither authorised surface is large enough for marks of 30 centimetres in height (whilst complying with sub-paragraph (g)), marks of the greatest height practicable in the circumstances must be displayed on the larger of the two authorised surfaces;

(g)marks on the vertical tail surfaces must be such as to leave a margin of at least five centimetres along each side of the vertical tail surface.

(4) On rotary wing aircraft where owing to the structure of the aircraft the greatest height practicable for the marks on the side of the fuselage (or equivalent structure) is less than 30 centimetres—

(a)the marks must also appear on the lower surface of the fuselage as close to the line of symmetry as practicable;

(b)they must be placed with the tops of the letters towards the nose;

(c)the height of the letters constituting each group of marks must be—

(i)subject to sub-paragraph (ii), at least 50 centimetres; or

(ii)if the lower surface of the fuselage is not large enough for the marks to be of 50 centimetres in height, marks of the greatest height practicable in the circumstances.

(5) Wherever in this paragraph marks of the greatest height practicable in the circumstances are required, that height must be such as is consistent with compliance with paragraph 4 of this Part.

Position and size of marks – airships and free balloons

3.—(1) The position and size of marks on airships and free balloons must be as specified in this paragraph.

(2) In the case of airships the marks must be—

(a)placed on each side of the airship; and

(b)placed horizontally either on the hull near the maximum cross-section of the airship or on the lower vertical stabiliser.

(3) In the case of free balloons, the marks must be in two places on diametrically opposite sides of the balloon.

(4) In the case of both airships and free balloons—

(a)the side marks must be so placed as to be visible from the sides and from the ground; and

(b)the height of the letters must be at least 50 centimetres.

Width, spacing and thickness of marks

4.—(1) For the purposes of this paragraph—

(a)“standard letter” means any letter other than the letters I, M and W;

(b)the width of each standard letter and the length of the hyphen between the nationality mark and the registration mark must be two thirds of the height of a letter;

(c)the width of the letters M and W must be neither less than two thirds of their height nor more than their height; and

(d)the width of the letter I must be one sixth of the height of the letter.

(2) The thickness of the lines comprising each letter and hyphen must be one sixth of the height of the letters forming the marks.

(3) Each letter and hyphen must be separated from the letter or hyphen which it immediately precedes or follows by a space equal to—

(a)either one quarter or one half of the width of a standard letter; and

(b)every other such space within the marks.

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