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PART 9Documents and records

Technical log for non-EASA aircraft

227.—(1) This article applies to each non-EASA aircraft registered in the United Kingdom for which a certificate of airworthiness is in force and which is a commercial air transport aircraft, public transport aircraft or commercial operation aircraft.

(2) Subject to paragraph (3), a technical log containing the information in paragraph 5 of Schedule 7 must be kept for every aircraft to which this article applies.

(3) In the case of an aircraft which has a maximum total weight authorised of 2,730kg or less and which is not operated by the holder of a national air operator’s certificate, a record approved by the CAA (in this article called “an approved record”) may be kept instead of a technical log.

(4) Subject to paragraph (5), at the end of every flight the pilot in command must enter in the technical log or the approved record—

(a)the times when the aircraft took off and landed;

(b)information about any defect which is known to the pilot in command and which affects the airworthiness or safe operation of the aircraft, or if no such defect is known to the pilot in command, an entry to that effect; and

(c)such other information about the airworthiness or operation of the aircraft as the CAA may require,

and must sign and date the entries.

(5) Subject to paragraph (6), if there are two or more consecutive flights, each of which begins and ends—

(a)within the same period of 24 hours;

(b)at the same aerodrome, except where each such flight is for the purpose of dropping or projecting any material for agricultural, public health or similar purposes; and

(c)with the same person as pilot in command of the aircraft,

the pilot in command may make the entries specified in paragraph (4) at the end of the last of such consecutive flights.

(6) Paragraph (5) does not apply if the pilot in command becomes aware of a defect during an earlier flight.

(7) When any defect which has been entered in a technical log or approved record is rectified the person issuing a certificate of release to service issued under this Order or in respect of that defect must enter the certificate in the technical log or approved record in such a position as to be readily identifiable with the defect to which it relates.

(8) Subject to paragraph (9) and Schedule 10, the technical log or approved record—

(a)must be carried in the aircraft when article 229 so requires; and

(b)a copy of the entries required by this article must be kept on the ground.

(9) In the case of an aircraft with a maximum take-off mass of not more than 2,730kg and which is not a commercial air transport aircraft, a public transport aircraft or a non-military state aircraft, if it is not reasonably practicable for the copy of the technical log or approved record to be kept on the ground it may be carried in the aircraft.

(10) Subject to article 238, a technical log or approved record required by this article must be preserved by the operator of the aircraft to which it relates for at least two years after the aircraft has been destroyed or has been permanently withdrawn from use, or for such shorter period as the CAA may permit in a particular case.