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The Food (Meat Inspection) (Scotland) Regulations 1988

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Statutory Instruments

1988 No. 1484 (S.144)

FOOD

FOOD HYGIENE

The Food (Meat Inspection) (Scotland) Regulations 1988

Made

17th August 1988

Laid before Parliament

5th September 1988

Coming into force

1st November 1988

The secretary of State, in exercise of the powers conferred on him by sections 13, 26(3) and 56 of the Food and Drugs (Scotland) Act 1956(1), and of all other powers enabling him in that behalf, having in accordance with section 56(6) of the said Act consulted with such organisations as appear to him to be representative of interests substantially affected by these Regulations, hereby makes the following Regulations:

PART IINTRODUCTORY

Citation, extent, commencement and application

1.—(1) These Regulations, which may be cited as the Food (Meat Inspection) (Scotland) Regulations 1988, shall apply to Scotland and shall come into force on 1st November 1988.

(2) Regulation 3 of theseRegulations shall not apply to the areas described in Schedule 1.

Interpretation

2.—(1) In these Regulations, unless the context otherwise requires—

“animal” means a domestic animal of the following species: bovine animals (including buffalo), swine, sheep, goats, solipeds and farmed deer;

“ante-mortem health inspection” means inspection of live animals in a slaughterhouse in accordance with the requirements of regulation 3 and Schedule 2;

“blood” means blood intended for human consumption derived from an animal;

“carcase” means the whole body of a slaughtered animal after bleeding and dressing;

“casualty animal” has the meaning assigned to it by regulation 7(1) of these Regulations;

“examine in detail” means to examine by making multiple deep incisions into lymph nodes;

“farmed deer” means any deer which—

(a)

are kept by any person by way of business on land enclosed by a deer proof barrier;

(b)

are conspicuously marked in such a way as to identify them as his; and

(c)

are kept by him—

(i)

primarily for the purpose of the production of meat or other foodstuffs or skins or other by-products; or

(ii)

primarily for breeding deer to be kept as mentioned in subparagraph (i) above;

“health mark” means a mark made by or under the supervision and responsibility of an inspector in accordance with regulation 6 and of a kind and in the manner set out in Schedule 4;

“inspector” means a veterinary meat inspector or a meat inspector;

“local authority” means the council of an islands area or district and, in relation to any land or premises, means the local authority within whose area the land or premises is or are situated;

“meat” means the flesh or other edible part of animals;

“meat inspector” means any person holding one of the qualifications set out in Schedule 6 and employed as a meat inspector by a local authority under regulation 14(1);

“offal” means meat other than that of the carcase whether or not naturally connected to the carcase;

“post-mortem health inspection” means inspection of slaughtered animals in a slaughterhouse in accordance with the requirements of regulation 5 and Schedule 3;

“private slaughterhouse” means a slaughterhouse other than a public slaughterhouse;

“public slaughterhouse” means any slaughterhouse, slaughtering in which is carried out by, or is under the effective control of, a local authority;

“slaughter”, in relation to any animal, means the killing of that animal with intent that the meat or blood to be derived from it shall be sold for human consumption, and “slaughtered” shall be construed accordingly;

“slaughterhouse” means any premises used for slaughtering animals, the flesh of which is intended for sale for human consumption and includes any place used in connection therewith;

“veterinary meat inspector” means any veterinary surgeon who is appointed an inspector of meat for the purposes of these Regulations or any person appointed under regulation 13(2) to exercise the functions of a veterinary meat inspector;

“veterinary surgeon” means a member of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons;

“viscera” means offal from the thoracic, abdominal and pelvic cavities, including the trachea and oesophagus.

(2) Except insofar as the context otherwise requires, any reference in these Regulations to a numbered regulation or Schedule shall be construed as a reference to the regulation or Schedule bearing that number in these Regulations.

PART IIINSPECTION AND HEALTH MARKETING

Ante-mortem inspections

3.—(1) Subject to paragraph (2) of this regulation, every animal which is to be slaughtered in a slaughterhouse shall be subjected to an ante-mortem health inspection by an inspector in accordance with Schedule 2.

(2) In the case of an animal to which the provisions of regulation 14 of the Slaughter of Animals (Prevention of Cruelty) (Scotland) Regulations 1955(2) apply, such animal may be slaughtered in a slaughterhouse without having been subjected to an ante-mortem health inspection if, after taking all reasonable steps to that end, the occupier of the slaughterhouse is unable to secure such inspection before it is necessary in compliance with the said regulation 14 for the animal to be slaughtered.

Dressing of slaughtered animals

4.—(1) The body of an animal slaughtered in a slaughterhouse shall be dressed immediately after the animal has been slaughtered and the following provisions of this regulation shall be complied with by the person who carries out the dressing.

(2) (a) The offal and blood derived from an animal shall, after they have been removed from the body, be kept until such time as an inspector directs, in such manner as he may direct for the purpose of ensuring their identity with the carcase and any directions so given shall be complied with;

(b)if the person dressing the body of an animal has reason to believe that there is in the meat or blood evidence of disease, he shall take no action, and ensure that no other person takes any action, which might alter or destroy that evidence, and shall comply with any instructions given by an inspector designed to ensure that such evidence as aforesaid is not altered or destroyed;

(c)blood intended for human consumption shall be collected into a receptacle used only for collecting such blood and shall be kept apart from blood not intended for human consumption.

(3) The employer or other person having control of any person engaged in dressing the body of an animal shall take all reasonable steps to secure compliance by the said last mentioned person with the provisions of this regulation.

Post-mortem inspections

5.—(1) Every animal slaughtered in a slaughterhouse shall be subjected to a post-mortem health inspection in accordance with the appropriate provisions of Schedule 3.

(2) No person shall remove, or cause or permit to be removed, from a slaughterhouse any blood intended for human consumption or any carcase or part of a carcase or any offal until it has been inspected in accordance with these Regulations and, in the case of meat passed as fit for human consumption after inspection, until it has been marked in accordance with regulation 6 and Schedule 4.

(3) An inspector shall, so far as is practicable, make his inspection of the meat derived from an animal slaughtered in a slaughterhouse immediately after the offal has been removed from the body of the animal, failing which he shall inspect the meat of the animal as soon as practicable after the body of the animal has been dressed.

(4) The carcase of an animal shall be divided into such portions as the veterinary meat inspector may require to enable him to make his inspection and the veterinary meat inspector may, for the purposes of inspection, direct that the portions into which the carcase is so divided shall be retained in the slaughterhouse for such period as he may think fit.

Health marking

6.—(1) Where meat has been passed as fit for human consumption following ante-mortem and post-mortem health inspections in accordance with these Regulations, it shall be marked in accordance with Schedule 4.

(2) No person other than an inspector acting in the course of his duties, or a person authorised on his behalf, shall in relation to any meat apply a health mark of the kind described in Schedule 4 to these Regulations.

(3) No person shall make or make use of any implement to apply a mark resembling a health mark used by an inspector in accordance with these Regulations with intent to deceive.

(4) The inspector shall be responsible for the security of any implement used for the purposes of applying a health mark.

PART IIIPROVISIONS AS TO ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED ELSEWHERE THAN IN A SLAUGHTERHOUSE

Casualty animals

7.—(1) The provisions of this Part of these Regulations shall apply in the case of an animal (hereafter in this Part referred to as “a casualty animal”) which is slaughtered elsewhere than in a slaughterhouse by reason of its having been affected by an accident, illness or other emergency in terms of section 12(1) of the Food and Drugs (Scotland) Act 1956.

(2) The body of a casualty animal, or the meat or blood derived therefrom, shall not be sold for human consumption until it has been inspected in a slaughterhouse into which it has been brought in accordance with the provisions of this Part of these Regulations, and the provisions of regulation 5 shall apply to such animal.

Dressing of casualty animals

8.—(1) The body of a casualty animal shall, if it is to be dressed elsewhere than in a slaughterhouse, be so dressed—

(a)as soon as may be after the animal has been slaughtered,

(b)at or as near as is practicable to the place where it is slaughtered, and

(c)as to ensure that the offal remains identifiable with the carcase of the animal or the portions into which the carcase has been divided.

(2) If the person dressing the body of a casualty animal, or any person having the custody or control of the meat derived from any such animal, has reason to believe that there is in the meat evidence of disease, he shall not knowingly take any action which might alter or destroy that evidence.

(3) Any person engaged in dressing the body of a casualty animal shall comply with the provisions of this regulation and the employer or other person having control of any person so engaged shall take all reasonable steps to ensure the compliance by the last mentioned person with the provisions of this regulation.

Casualty animals brought into slaughterhouses

9.—(1) The owner of the body of a casualty animal, the meat to be derived from which is intended for human consumption, shall bring the body of the animal or, where the body has been dressed, the meat, into a slaughterhouse for inspection by a meat inspector and shall ensure that the offal is identifiable with the carcase from which it was derived.

(2) The person having charge of the slaughterhouse into which it is proposed to bring the body of, or the meat derived from, a casualty animal shall accept the body, or the meat, into the slaughterhouse only if there is furnished to him a statement signed by a veterinary surgeon containing the following particulars—

(a)the reason for the animal having been slaughtered elsewhere than in a slaughterhouse,

(b)that the animal was not at the time of slaughter suffering from any disease notifiable under the Animal Health Act 1981(3), and

(c)any drug which, to the knowledge of the veterinary surgeon, has been administered to the animal before slaughter and which might affect the meat or blood derived from the animal.

(3) A statement in terms of this regulation shall also be furnished to the meat inspector carrying out the inspection.

PART IVTRANSFER OF MEAT FROM ONE SLAUGHTERHOUSE TO ANOTHER

Need for inspector’s statement

10.  Any meat which does not bear a health mark in terms of Schedule 4 may be brought into a slaughterhouse other than that in which it was inspected only if there is produced, to the person having charge of the slaughterhouse into which the meat is to be brought, a statement signed by the inspector who inspected the meat that it has been inspected by him and is fit for human consumption.

PART VADMINISTRATION

Fixing of hours of slaughter

11.—(1) Every local authority within whose area a private slaughterhouse is situated shall determine the days on which, and the hours in those days between which, animals may be slaughtered in the slaughterhouse and in fixing those days and hours the local authority shall have regard to the nature and extent of the business carried on at the slaughterhouse and may from time to time vary the days and hours so fixed and shall intimate to the person registered under the Slaughter of Animals (Scotland) Act 1980(4), in respect of the slaughterhouse, any determination or variation of those days or hours and, subject to the provision of paragraph (2) of this regulation, no animal shall be slaughtered in the slaughterhouse at any time other than a time within the hours so fixed.

(2) Notwithstanding the foregoing provisions of this regulation, or of any determination or variation made by a local authority by virtue of them, an animal may be slaughtered in a slaughterhouse at a time other than a time fixed by a local authority if—

(a)it has been affected by an accident, illness or other emergency to which section 12(1) of the Food and Drugs (Scotland) Act 1956 applies;

(b)it is an animal which is required by the provisions of regulation 14 of the Slaughter of Animals (Prevention of Cruelty) (Scotland) Regulations 1955 to be slaughtered without delay; or

(c)the person having charge of the slaughterhouse requires in special circumstances to slaughter an animal and has given to the local authority 24 hours notice of his proposal to do so.

Records to be kept by local authorities

12.  A local authority shall keep in respect of each slaughterhouse in their area a record of the matters set out in Schedule 5.

Qualifications of veterinary meat inspectors

13.—(1) Subject to the provisions of paragraph (2) of this regulation, a person appointed by a local authority as a veterinary meat inspector for the purposes of these Regulations shall be a veterinary surgeon.

(2) A registered medical practitioner may, with the approval of the Secretary of State, be appointed by the local authority to exercise the functions of a veterinary meat inspector under these Regulations with the exception of those duties laid down in Schedule 2.

Qualifications of meat inspectors

14.—(1) A person shall not be employed by a local authority as a meat inspector for the purpose of these Regulations unless such person is the holder of a qualification set out in Schedule 6.

(2) This requirement shall not apply to any persons employed as meat inspectors before the day on which these Regulations come into force.

PART VICHARGES FOR MEAT INSPECTION

Charges by local authorities for meat inspection

15.—(1) Subject to the provisions of this regulation, a local authority may make charges for inspections carried out in pursuance of these Regulations of such amounts as are determined by them from time to time.

(2) Charges made in pursuance of this regulation shall relate to inspections carried out in individual premises within the local authority area.

(3) In determining such charges as aforesaid, a local authority shall ensure that from time to time the charges are reasonably sufficient to meet the costs of the authority which are—

(a)specified in Schedule 7, and

(b)necessarily incurred in securing the inspections required by these Regulations.

(4) In determining such charges as aforesaid a local authority shall consult with such persons or organisations as appear to them to be representative of interests substantially affected by the charges and shall provide to any such person or organisation at his or their written request a breakdown in writing of the calculation of the charges in relation to the costs specified in Schedule 7.

Payment of charges

16.  Any charge made by a local authority by virtue of the last foregoing regulation shall be payable—

(a)in respect of any animal slaughtered in a private slaughterhouse, by the person registered under section 4 of the Slaughter of Animals (Scotland) Act 1980 to use the said slaughterhouse;

(b)in respect of any animal slaughtered in a public slaughterhouse, by the person on whose behalf the animal is slaughtered;

(c)in any other case, by the person who brings the body of the animal or, where the body has been dressed, the meat, into a slaughterhouse in accordance with the provisions of regulation 9.

PART VIIGENERAL

Saving for Animal Health Act 1981

17.  Nothing in these Regulations shall be construed as derogating from the provisions of the Animal Health Act 1981, or of any Order or Regulations made under that Act.

Enforcement

18.  Each local authority shall execute and enforce the provisions of these Regulations in their area.

Offences and penalties

19.  Any person who contravenes or fails to comply with any requirement of these Regulations shall be guilty of an offence and shall be liable—

(a)on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding 2,000;

(b)on conviction on indictment to a fine or to imprisonment for a term not exceeding one year, or both.

Revocations

20.  The Regulations specified in Schedule 8 are hereby revoked.

Sanderson of Bowden

Minister of State, Scottish Office

St Andrew’s House,

Edinburgh

17th August 1988

Regulation 1

SCHEDULE 1AREAS TO WHICH REGULATION 3 OF THESE REGULATIONS DOES NOT APPLY

The areas which prior to 16th May 1975 formed the landward areas of the Counties of Argyll, Bute, Inverness, Orkney, Ross and Cromarty, and Zetland.

Regulation 3(1)

SCHEDULE 2ANTE-MORTEM HEALTH INSPECTION

REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE IN SLAUGHTERHOUSES

1.  Animals intended for slaughter shall undergo ante-mortem health inspection on the day of their arrival at the slaughterhouse or before the beginning of daily slaughtering. The inspection shall be repeated immediately before slaughter if the animal has been kept in the lairage overnight and at any time if required by the inspector.

2.  The occupier of the slaughterhouse or his agent shall provide adequate facilities and assistance to enable ante-mortem health inspections to be undertaken.

3.  The ante-mortem health inspection shall be made under adequate natural or artificial lighting.

4.  The ante-mortem health inspection shall determine—

(a)whether the animals are showing symptoms of a disease;

(b)whether they are injured, fatigued or stressed;

(c)whether there is visible evidence that they have had substances with pharmacological effects administered to them or have consumed any other substances which may make the meat unfit for human consumption.

5.  Animals shall not be slaughtered for production of meat for human consumption if they—

(a)show any of the symptoms mentioned in paragraph 4(a) of this Schedule;

(b)have not been rested for an adequate period of time, which for fatigued or stressed animals must not, unless the inspector determines otherwise, be less than 24 hours;

(c)have been found to have any form of clinical tuberculosis.

6.  An animal which shows any of the symptoms mentioned in paragraph 4(a) of this Schedule shall be taken to and kept in that part of the lairage provided for isolation of animals which are diseased or injured or suspected of being diseased or injured and shall be examined by the veterinary meat inspector. Unless the veterinary meat inspector passes the animal as fit for slaughter for human consumption, he shall require that—

(a)it shall be slaughtered and dressed in suitable, sufficient and separate accommodation capable of being securely locked and used solely for the purpose of slaughtering such animals; or

(b)it shall be slaughtered and dressed at a time other than that at which the slaughter of other animals is taking place and that, immediately following slaughtering and dressing of the animal and before the slaughtering of other animals takes place, the premises shall be fully cleaned and disinfected in such manner as he shall determine; or

(c)it shall be disposed of as he may direct having regard to the nature of the disease from which the animal is suffering and any such directions shall be complied with.

Regulation 5(1)

SCHEDULE 3POST-MORTEM HEALTH INSPECTION REQUIREMENTS

PART IGeneral Instructions

1.  The carcase and offal and the blood of each slaughtered animal shall be examined without delay by an inspector. He shall have regard to—

(a)the age and sex of the animal;

(b)the state of nutrition of the animal;

(c)any evidence of bruising or haemorrhage;

(d)any local or general oedema;

(e)the efficiency of bleeding;

(f)any swelling, deformity or other abnormality of bones, joints, musculature or umbilicus;

(g)any abnormality in consistency, colour, odour and, where appropriate, taste;

(h)the condition of the pleura and peritoneum;

(i)any other evidence of abnormality.

2.  The inspection shall include—

(a)palpation of certain organs, in particular the lungs, liver, spleen and tongue and, where considered necessary by the inspector, the uterus and udder;

(b)incisions of organs and lymph nodes as specified in Parts II, III, IV, V, VI and VII of this Schedule.

3.  Where the inspector considers it necessary, incisions and inspection of meat other than those specified in Parts II, III, IV, V, VI and VII of this Schedule shall be undertaken.

4.  Where necessary the inspector shall arrange for laboratory investigations to be carried out.

5.—(1) Any carcase, offal or blood which shows evidence of the diseases or conditions mentioned in the Annex to this Part of this Schedule, or which may for any reason be suspected of being unfit for human consumption, shall be isolated and shall not be removed from the place of isolation until it has been inspected by a veterinary meat inspector.

(2) Subject to sub-paragraph (3) of this paragraph, if the veterinary meat inspector is satisfied that the carcase or offal, or any part of the carcase or offal, or the blood is unfit for human consumption he shall give instructions, save in the case to which sub-paragraph (4) applies, that the carcase or offal, or such part of the carcase or offal, or the blood shall not be disposed of for human consumption but shall be disposed of in accordance with the provisions of any regulations providing for the disposal of an unfit carcase, offal or blood.

(3) If the veterinary meat inspector is satisfied that the carcase or offal, or any part of the carcase or offal, or the blood is derived from an animal which was suffering from any of the diseases specified in the Annex to this Part of this Schedule, he shall, after having made any assessment required by the said Annex, give instructions, save in the case to which sub-paragraph (4) applies, that the carcase or offal, or such part of the carcase or offal as he is by the said Annex in relation to that condition directed to give such instructions, or the blood shall not be disposed of for human consumption but shall be disposed of in accordance with the provisions of any regulations providing for the disposal of an unfit carcase, offal or blood.

(4) If the veterinary meat inspector has given instructions under sub-paragraphs (2) or (3) that the carcase or offal, or any part of the carcase or offal, or the blood derived from an animal is unfit for human consumption, the provisions of section 9 of the Food and Drugs (Scotland) Act 1956 (which relates to the examination and seizure of unsound food) shall apply in the case of the carcase or offal, or any part of the carcase or offal, or the blood.

ANNEXIndications of unfitness for human consumption

1.  The veterinary meat inspector shall direct that no part of the carcase, offal or blood of any animal shall be sold for human consumption if he is satisfied from his examination of the carcase or offal that the animal was suffering from any of the following diseases or conditions, namely— actinobacillosis (generalised) or actinomycosis (generalised),

  • anaemia (advanced),

  • anthrax,

  • blackleg,

  • bruising, extensive and severe,

  • caseous lymphadenitis associated with emaciation,

  • caseous lymphadenitis (generalised),

  • cysticercus bovis (generalised),

  • cysticercus cellulosae,

  • cysticercus ovis (generalised),

  • decomposition (generalised),

  • emaciation (pathological),

  • fever,

  • foot and mouth disease,

  • glanders,

  • immaturity—

    (a)

    stillborn or unborn carcases,

    (b)

    oedematous carcases, and carcases in poor physical condition,

  • jaundice,

  • malignant catarrhal fever,

  • mastitis (acute septic),

  • melanosis (generalised),

  • metritis (acute septic),

  • odour (abnormal) associated with disease or otherwise prejudicial to health,

  • oedema (generalised),

  • pericarditis (acute septic),

  • peritonitis (acute diffuse septic),

  • pleurisy (acute diffuse septic),

  • pneumonia (acute septic),

  • pyaemia (including joint-ill),

  • sarcocysts (generalised),

  • septicaemia or toxaemia,

  • swine erysipelas (acute),

  • swine fever,

  • tetanus,

  • trichinosis,

  • tuberculosis (generalised),

  • tuberculosis with emaciation, tumours—

    (a)

    malignant with secondary growths,

    (b)

    multiple,

  • uraemia.

2.  The veterinary meat inspector shall direct that the blood of any animal shall not be sold for human consumption if he is satisfied—

(a)that the carcase or offal of that animal are affected with any infectious conditions, or

(b)that the blood is contaminated by stomach contents or other extraneous matter.

3.—(1) A veterinary meat inspector shall in determining for the purpose of this Schedule whether tuberculosis is generalised take into account the sum of the evidence of disease and the character of the lesions throughout the entire carcase and, for the purposes of this paragraph, shall accept the existence of tuberculosis in the associated lymph node of an organ or viscera as evidence of the disease in the organ or viscera.

(2) If the veterinary meat inspector is satisfied that any of the following conditions exist in the carcase or offal of an animal, namely—

(a)miliary tuberculosis of both lungs with evidence of tuberculosis elsewhere;

(b)multiple and actively progressive lesions of tuberculosis;

(c)widespread tuberculosis infection of the lymph nodes of the carcase;

(d)diffuse acute lesions of tuberculosis of both the pleura and peritoneum associated with an enlarged or tuberculous lymph node of the carcase;

(e)active or recent lesions present in the substance of any two of the following:—

  • the spleen, kidney, udder, uterus, ovary, testicle, brain or its membranes, spinal cord or its membranes, in addition to tuberculous lesions in the respiratory and digestive tracts;

(f)in the case of a calf, congenital tuberculosis;

he shall determine the tuberculosis to be generalised.

(3) When, as the result of his examination, the veterinary meat inspector is satisfied that the carcase or offal of an animal is affected with tuberculosis other than of the kinds mentioned in paragraph 1 of this Annex he shall direct that—

(a)any part of the carcase in relation to which he is satisfied that it is so infected;

(b)any part of the carcase, contiguous to any such part;

(c)the head including the tongue, when tuberculosis exists in any lymph node associated with the head or tongue; and

(d)any organ when tuberculosis exists on the capsule or in the substance of the organ, or the viscera when tuberculosis exists on the surfaces or substances of the viscera or in any lymph nodes associated with the organ or the viscera as the case may be;

shall not be sold for human consumption.

(4) A veterinary meat inspector shall direct that any part of a carcase or offal contaminated with tuberculous material shall not be sold for human consumption.

4.—(1) In any case in which the veterinary meat inspector, in the course of his examination, is satisfied that any part of the carcase or any offal is affected with a localised infestation of cysticercus bovis he shall direct that that part of the carcase or offal shall not be sold for human consumption.

(2) Where in any such case as aforesaid a veterinary meat inspector has directed that any part of the carcase of an animal or any offal of an animal shall not be sold for human consumption, the remainder of the meat of the animal shall also be subject to the like direction unless it is forthwith placed in cold storage at a temperature not exceeding −7oC for a period of not less than three weeks or at a temperature not exceeding −10oC for a period of not less than two weeks or is treated by such other method as may be approved by the Secretary of State:

  • Provided that in any such case the alimentary tract shall not be placed in cold storage or be sold for human consumption.

(3) Any person who causes any part of a carcase or any offal to be placed in cold storage for the purposes of the last foregoing sub-paragraph shall, at the same time as he causes it to be so placed, give notice to the local authority within whose district the cold store is situated, in such form as the local authority may require, of the date of the placing and the period for which it is intended that the part of a carcase or offal, as the case may be, will remain in cold storage.

5.—(1) If, as a result of his inspection of a carcase and offal of an animal, a veterinary meat inspector is satisfied that the following conditions exist therein, namely—

(a)caseous lymphadenitis associated with emaciation;

(b)multiple, acute and actively progressive lesions of caseous lymphadenitis; or

(c)multiple lesions of caseous lymphadenitis which are inactive but widespread; he shall direct that no part of the carcase and offal shall be sold for human consumption.

(2) If a veterinary meat inspector is satisfied that caseous lymphadenitis exists on the surface or substance of an organ or in its associated lymph node he shall direct that the organ and its associated lymph node shall not be sold for human consumption.

(3) If a veterinary meat inspector is satisfied that caseous lymphadenitis exists otherwise than as described in sub-paragraphs (1) and (2) of this paragraph he shall direct that the lesion and such of the surrounding parts as he may think proper, having regard to the age and degree of activity of the lesion, shall not be sold for human consumption.

6.  Where, as a result of his examination, the veterinary meat inspector is satisfied that the whole or any part of the carcase or any offal derived from an animal is affected by any disease or condition other than one mentioned in the foregoing paragraphs of this Annex or is contaminated, he shall direct that the whole of the carcase and all offal or the part of the carcase and the parts adjacent thereto or the offal, as he may think proper, shall not be sold for human consumption.

7.  Where, as a result of his examination, the veterinary meat inspector is satisfied that a part of the carcase or offal derived from an animal is affected by a slight localised infestation by a parasite not transmissible to man but that the remainder of the carcase or offal as the case may be is fit for human consumption, the inspector may, if he thinks fit, remove the parasite and trim the surrounding part and shall direct that the trimmings shall not be sold for human consumption.

PART IIDetailed Instructions

Bovine animals over 6 weeks

1.  In the case of bovine animals over 6 weeks old the inspection shall include in particular an examination of—

(a)the head and the throat; the surface of the tongue after it has been freed to permit a detailed inspection of the mouth and the fauces; the retro-pharyngeal, submaxillary and parotid lymph nodes shall be examined in detail; the external (masseter) cheek muscles in which at least two deep incisions shall be made and internal (pterygoid) cheek muscles in which at least one deep incision shall be made; all incisions shall be made parallel to the mandible from its upper muscular insertion;

(b)the lungs, the trachea and oesophagus; the oesophagus shall be palpated; the trachea and the main branches of the bronchi shall be opened lengthwise and the lungs shall be incised in their posterior third, at right angles to their main axes; save that these incisions are not necessary where the lungs are excluded from human consumption; the bronchial and mediastinal lymph nodes shall be examined in detail;

(c)the pericardium, which shall be opened, and the heart; the latter shall be incised lengthwise so as to open the ventricles and t o cut through the intra-ventricular septum;

(d)the diaphragm;

(e)the surfaces and substance of the liver and the hepatic lymph nodes; an examination of the bile ducts shall be carried out by means of incisions into the gastric surface of the liver and at the base of the caudate lobe; the hepatic lymph nodes shall be palpated;

(f)the alimentary tract, the mesentery and the gastric, pancreatic and mesenteric lymph nodes; these lymph nodes shall be palpated and, if an inspector considers it necessary, the gastric and mesenteric lympth nodes shall be examined in detail;

(g)the surface of the spleen;

(h)the kidneys which, if an inspector considers it necessary, shall be incised and the renal lymph nodes examined in detail;

(i)the pleura and the peritoneum;

(j)the genital organs;

(k)the udder which, if an inspector considers it necessary, shall be incised; in the case of a cow the udder must be opened by a long deep incision as far as the lactiferous sinuses unless it is to be excluded from human consumption; if an inspector considers it necessary the supramammary lymph nodes shall be palpated and examined in detail;

(l)the feet, if an inspector considers it necessary.

2.  Where evidence of tuberculosis is found, an inspector shall—

(a)split the carcase, examine the vertebrae, ribs, sternum, spinal cord and brain, incise the kidneys;

(b)examine in detail such of the following lymph nodes as he has not already so examined: superficial inguinal, prescapular, prepectoral, presternal, suprasternal, xiphoid, subdorsal, intercostal, iliac, sublumbar, ischiatic, precrural and popliteal, the lymph nodes least likely in the particular case to show evidence of infection being examined first.

PART IIIDetailed Instructions

Bovine animals less than 6 weeks

1.  In the case of bovines less than 6 weeks old the inspection shall include in particular an examination of—

(a)the head, the throat, the surface of the tongue, the mouth and the fauces; the retro-pharyngeal lymph nodes shall be examined in detail;

(b)the lungs, the trachea and oesophagus; the trachea and the main branches of the bronchi shall be opened lengthwise and the lungs shall be incised in their posterior third, at right angles to their main axes; save that these incisions are not necessary where the lungs are to be excluded from human consumption; the bronchial and mediastinal lymph nodes shall be examined in detail;

(c)the pericardium, which shall be opened, and the heart; the latter shall be incised lengthwise so as to open the ventricles and to cut through the intra-ventricular septum;

(d)the diaphragm;

(e)the surfaces and substance of the liver and the hepatic lymph nodes; the liver shall be incised if an inspector considers it necessary; the hepatic lymph nodes shall be palpated and, if an inspector considers it necessary, examined in detail;

(f)the alimentary tract, the mesentery and the gastric, pancreatic and mesenteric lymph nodes; the gastric and mesenteric lymph nodes shall be palpated and, if an inspector considers it necessary, examined in detail;

(g)the surface of the spleen;

(h)the kidneys which, if an inspector considers it necessary, shall be incised and the renal lymph nodes examined in detail;

(i)the pleura and the peritoneum;

(j)the umbilical region and joints which shall be palpated; where an inspector considers it necessary the umbilical region shall be incised, the joints shall be opened and the synovial fluid examined;

(k)the feet, if an inspector considers it necessary.

2.  Where evidence of tuberculosis is found, an inspector shall—

(a)split the carcase, examine the vertebrae, ribs, sternum, spinal cord and brain, incise the kidneys;

(b)examine in detail such of the following lymph nodes as he has not already so examined: superficial inguinal, prescapular, prepectoral, presternal, suprasternal, xiphoid, subdorsal, intercostal, iliac, sublumbar, ischiatic, precrural and popliteal, the lymph nodes least likely in the particular case to show evidence of infection being examined first.

PART IVDetailed Instructions

Swine

1.  In the case of swine the inspection shall include in particular an examination of—

(a)the head, the throat, the surface of the tongue, the mouth and the fauces; the submaxillary lymph nodes shall be examined in detail;

(b)the lungs, the trachea and oesophagus; the trachea and the main branches of the bronchi shall be opened lengthwise and the lungs shall be incised in their posterior third, at right angles to their main axes (save that the lungs need not be incised if they are to be excluded from human consumption); the bronchial and mediastinal lymph nodes shall be examined and palpated;

(c)the pericardium, which shall be opened, and the heart; the latter shall be incised lengthwise so as to open the ventricles and to cut through the intra-ventricular septum;

(d)the diaphragm;

(e)the surfaces and substances of the liver and the hepatic lymph nodes; the hepatic lymph nodes shall be palpated;

(f)the alimentary tract, the mesentery and the gastric, pancreatic and mesenteric lymph nodes; the gastric and mesenteric lymph nodes shall be palpated and, if an inspector considers it necessary, examined in detail;

(g)the surface of the spleen;

(h)the kidneys if an inspector considers it necessary; if an inspector considers it necessary the kidneys shall be incised and the renal lymph nodes examined in detail;

(i)the pleura and the peritoneum;

(j)the genital organs;

(k)the udder and the supramammary lymph nodes; in the case of sows the supramammary lymph nodes shall be examined in detail;

(l)the umbilical region and joints of young animals which shall be palpated; where an inspector considers it necessary the umbilical region shall be incised and the joints shall be opened;

(m)the feet, if an inspector considers it necessary.

2.  An investigation for cysticercus cellulosae shall be carried out which shall include examination of the directly visible muscular surfaces, in particular the thigh muscles, the pillars of the diaphragm, the intercostal muscles, the heart, tongue and larynx; if an inspector considers it necessary, both the abdominal wall and the psoas muscles, freed from fatty tissue, shall be examined.

3.  If an abscess is found in the carcase or in any organ of any swine, or if an inspector has reason to suspect the presence of any such abscess, he shall require the carcase to be split through the spinal column if it has not already been so split and shall examine in detail such of the following lymph nodes as he has not already so examined: superficial inguinal, supramammary, cervical, prepectoral, prescapular, presternal, sublumbar, iliac, precrural and, if he considers it necessary, the popliteal.

4.  Where evidence of tuberculosis is found, an inspector shall—

(a)split the carcase, examine the vertebrae, ribs, sternum, spinal cord and brain, expose and incise the kidneys; (b) examine in detail such of the following lymph nodes as he has not already so examined: superficial inguinal, cervical, prepectoral, prescapular, subdorsal, sublumbar, iliac, precrural and, if he considers it necessary, the popliteal.

PART VDetailed Instructions

Sheep and Goats

1.  In the case of sheep and goats the inspection shall include in particular an examination of—

(a)the head after flaying with, if an inspector considers it necessary, the surface of the tongue, the mouth, throat, retro-pharyngeal and parotid lymph nodes (save that these examinations and the flaying are not required if the local authority ensures that the head, including the tongue and brains, is excluded from human consumption);

(b)the lungs, the trachea and oesophagus; if an inspector considers it necessary the trachea and the main branches of the bronchi shall be opened lengthwise and the lungs shall be incised in their posterior third, at right angles to their main axes; the bronchial and mediastinal lymph nodes shall be palpated and, if an inspector considers it necessary, examined in detail;

(c)the pericardium, which shall be opened, and the heart; where an inspector considers it necessary the heart shall be incised lengthwise so as to open the ventricles and to cut through the intra-ventricular septum;

(d)the diaphragm;

(e)the surfaces and substance of the liver which shall be incised on the gastric surface to examine the bile ducts; the hepatic lymph nodes shall be examined and palpated;

(f)the alimentary tract and the mesentery; the gastric, pancreatic and mesenteric lymph nodes shall be examined;

(g)the surface of the spleen;

(h)the kidneys which, if an inspector considers it necessary, shall be incised and the renal lymph nodes examined in detail;

(i)the pleura and the peritoneum;

(j)the genital organs;

(k)the udder; the supramammary lymph nodes shall be examined;

(l)the umbilical region and the joints of young animals which shall be palpated; where an inspector considers it necessary the umbilical region shall be incised and the joints shall be opened;

(m)the feet, if an inspector considers it necessary.

2.  Where an inspector has reason to suspect that a suppurative condition exists in the carcase of any sheep or lamb he shall—

(a)examine by palpation as well as by observation such of the lymph nodes as are readily accessible; and

(b)in the case of a sheep, examine in detail such of the following lymph nodes as he has not already so examined: prescapular, superficial inguinal, precrural; and, in the case of a lamb, examine in detail such lymph nodes if he has found evidence of disease in the course of visual examination or palpation.

3.  Where evidence of tuberculosis is found, an inspector shall split the carcase, examine the vertebrae, ribs, sternum, spinal cord and brain, expose and incise the kidneys.

PART VIDetailed Instructions

Domestic solipeds

1.  In the case of domestic solipeds the inspection shall include in particular an examination of—

(a)the head and the throat; the surface of the tongue after it has been freed to permit a detailed inspection of the mouth and the fauces; the retro-pharyngeal, submaxillary and parotid lymph nodes shall be palpated and, if an inspector considers it necessary, examined in detail;

(b)the lungs, the trachea and oesophagus; the trachea and the main branches of the bronchi shall be opened lengthwise and the lungs shall be incised in their posterior third, at right angles to their main axes (save that these incisions are not necessary where the lungs are excluded from human consumption); the bronchial and mediastinal lymph nodes shall be palpated and, if an inspector considers it necessary, examined in detail;

(c)the pericardium, which shall be opened, and the heart; the latter shall be incised lengthwise so as to open the ventricles and to cut through the intra-ventricular septum;

(d)the diaphragm;

(e)the surfaces and substance of the liver and the hepatic lymph nodes; the liver shall be incised if an inspector considers it necessary; the hepatic lymph nodes shall be palpated and, if an inspector considers it necessary, the hepatic lymph nodes shall be examined in detail;

(f)the alimentary tract, the mesentery and the gastric, pancreatic and mesenteric lymph nodes; if an inspector considers it necessary the lymph nodes shall be examined in detail;

(g)the surface of the spleen;

(h)the kidneys, which shall be palpated and, if an inspector considers it necessary, incised; if an inspector considers it necessary the renal lymph nodes shall be examined in detail;

(i)the pleura and the peritoneum;

(j)the genital organs of stallions and mares;

(k)the udder and the supramammary lymph nodes shall be examined and, if an inspector considers it necessary, the supramammary lymph nodes shall be examined in detail;

(l)the umbilical region and joints of young animals which shall be palpated; where an inspector considers it necessary the umbilical region shall be incised and the joints shall be opened;

(m)all grey or white horses must be examined for melanosis and melanomata; in particular the muscles of one shoulder and the prescapular lymph node shall be examined; this lymph node shall be exposed beneath the scapular cartilage by loosening the attachment of one shoulder; in addition the kidneys shall be examined after splitting by a longitudinal incision which exposes both cortex and medulla.

2.  An investigation for glanders shall be carried out by means of careful examination of mucous membranes of the trachea, larynx, nasal cavities, sinuses and their ramifications, after splitting the head in the median plane and excision of the nasal septum.

3.  Where evidence of tuberculosis is found, an inspector shall—

(a)split the carcase, examine the vertebrae, ribs, sternum, spinal cord and brain, incise the kidneys;

(b)examine in detail such of the following lymph nodes as he has not already so examined: superficial inguinal, prescapular, prepectoral, presternal, suprasternal, xiphoid, subdorsal, intercostal, iliac, sublumbar, ischiatic, precrural and popliteal, the lymph nodes least likely in the particular case to show evidence of infection being examined first.

PART VIIDetailed Instructions

Deer

1.  In the case of farmed deer, the inspection shall include in particular an examination of—

(a)the head after flaying, the throat, the surface of the tongue after it has been freed to permit a detailed inspection of the mouth and the fauces; the retro-pharyngeal submaxillary and parotid lymph nodes shall be examined in detail;

(b)the lungs, the trachea and oesophagus; the trachea and the main branches of the bronchi shall be opened lengthwise and the lungs shall be incised in their posterior third, at right angles to their main axes, save that these incisions are not necessary where the lungs are excluded from human consumption; the bronchial and mediastinal lymph nodes shall be examined in detail;

(c)the pericardium, which shall be opened, and the heart; the latter shall be incised lengthwise so as to open the ventricles and to cut through the intra-ventricular septum;

(d)the diaphragm;

(e)the surfaces and substance of the liver which shall be incised on the gastric surface to examine the bile ducts; the hepatic lymph nodes shall be examined and palpated;

(f)the alimentary tract, the mesentery and the gastric, pancreatic and mesenteric lymph nodes; the gastric and mesenteric lymph nodes shall be palpated and, if an inspector consi 2/3 ders it necessary, examined in detail;

(g)the surface of the spleen;

(h)the kidneys which, if an inspector considers it necessary, shall be incised and the renal lymph nodes examined in detail;

(i)the pleura and the peritoneum;

(j)the genital organs;

(k)the udder which, if an inspector considers it necessary, shall be incised and the supramammary lymph nodes shall be palpated and examined in detail;

(l)the umbilical region and the joints of young animals shall be palpated; where an inspector considers it necessary the umbilical region shall be incised, the joints shall be opened and the synovial fluid examined;

(m)the feet, if an inspector considers it necessary.

2.  Where an inspector has reason to suspect that a suppurative condition exists in the carcase he shall—

(a)examine by palpation as well as by observation such of the lymph nodes as are readily accessible; and

(b)examine in detail such lymph nodes if he has found evidence of disease in the course of visual examination or palpation.

3.  Where evidence of tuberculosis is found, an inspector shall—

(a)split the carcase, examine the vertebrae, ribs, sternum, spinal cord and brain, incise the kidneys;

(b)examine in detail such of the following lymph nodes as he has not already so examined; superficial inguinal, prescapular, prepectoral, presternal, suprasternal, xiphoid, subdorsal, intercostal, iliac, sublumbar, ischiatic, precrural and popliteal, the lymph nodes least likely in the particular case to show evidence of infection being examined first.

Regulation 6(1)

SCHEDULE 4HEALTH MARKING

1.  The health mark referred to in regulation 6 shall be applied by or under the supervision and responsibility of the inspector. The health mark shall identify the local authority and, if required by the local authority, the inspector by whom the inspection was carried out or the slaughterhouse where the inspection was carried out.

2.  The health mark shall consist of a thistle shaped mark and shall be of the following dimensions—

(a)overall length 55mm;

(b)diameter of the base circle 30mm;

(c)within the upper part of the base circle the appropriate letters 8mm high identifying the local authority;

(d)if required, within the lower part of the base circle the number 10mm high identifying the inspector or slaughterhouse.

3.  The colouring matter used to apply the mark shall be Chocolate Brown HT. (Colour Index No. 20285-Systematic Name or Description di Sodium 4,4'-(2,4-dihydroxy-5-hydroxymethyl-1,3-phenylenebisazo) di (naphthalene-1-sulphonate)).

4.—(a) In the case of a horse or bovine animal other than a calf, the mark shall be impressed on each quarter of the carcase;

(b)in the case of any other animal, the mark shall be impressed on each side of the carcase.

5.  The following letters shall be used to identify the local authority:—

  • AA The City of Aberdeen District Council

  • AB The Angus District Council

  • AC The Annandale & Eskdale District Council

  • AD The Argyll & Bute District Council

  • BA The Badenoch & Strathspey District Council

  • BB The Banff & Buchan District Council

  • BC The Bearsden & Milngavie District Council

  • BD The Berwickshire District Council

  • CA The Caithness District Council

  • CB The Clackmannan District Council

  • CC The Clydebank District Council

  • CD The Clydesdale District Council

  • CE The Cumbernauld & Kilsyth District Council

  • CF The Cumnock & Doon Valley District Council

  • CG The Cunninghame District Council

  • DA The Dumbarton District Council

  • DB The City of Dundee District Council

  • DC The Dunfermline District Council

  • EA The East Kilbride District Council

  • EB The East Lothian District Council

  • EC The Eastwood District Council

  • ED The City of Edinburgh District Council

  • EE The Ettrick & Lauderdale District Council

  • FA The Falkirk District Council

  • GA The City of Glasgow District Council

  • GB The Gordon District Council

  • HA The Hamilton District Council

  • IA The Inverclyde District Council

  • IB The Inverness District Council

  • KA The Kilmarnock & Loudoun District Council

  • KB The Kincardine & Deeside District Council

  • KC The Kirkcaldy District Council

  • KD The Kyle and Carrick District Council

  • LA The Lochaber District Council

  • MA The Midlothian District Council

  • MB The Monklands District Council

  • MC The Moray District Council

  • MD The Motherwell District Council

  • NA The Nairn District Council

  • NB The Nithsdale District Council

  • NC The North East Fife District Council

  • OA The Orkney Islands Council

  • PA The Perth & Kinross District Council

  • RA The Renfrew District Council

  • RB The Ross & Cromarty District Council

  • RC The Roxburgh District Council

  • SA The Shetland Islands Council

  • SB The Stewartry District Council

  • SC The Stirling District Council

  • SD The Strathkelvin District Council

  • SE The Sutherland District Council

  • SF The Skye and Lochalsh District Council

  • TA The Tweeddale District Council

  • WA The Western Isles Islands Council

  • WB The West Lothian District Council

  • WD The Wigtown District Council.

Regulation 12

SCHEDULE 5MATTERS AS TO WHICH RECORDS ARE TO BE KEPT BY LOCAL AUTHORITIES

1.  A local authority shall in respect of each slaughterhouse in their area keep separate records relating to cattle (other than calves), calves, sheep, swine, horses and farmed deer slaughtered there as follows:—

(a)the number of animals inspected;

(b)the number of entire carcases with organs and viscera subject to an instruction and the diseases of which they showed evidence;

(c)the number of carcases partly subject to an instruction with details of the parts in respect of which the instruction was given and the diseases of which each showed evidence;

(d)the number of organs or viscera subject to an instruction with details thereof and of the diseases of which each showed evidence;

(e)the manner in which meat subject to an instruction was disposed of.

2.—(1) In this Schedule “instruction” means an instruction given by an inspector under Part I of Schedule 3 that the carcase of an animal or, as the case may be, the organs or viscera or any part thereof shall not be disposed of for human consumption.

(2) In compiling records as aforesaid the local authority shall, so far as possible, describe a disease by the name used in relation to that disease in Schedule 3.

Regulation 14

SCHEDULE 6QUALIFICATIONS OF MEAT INSPECTORS

1.  Registered Medical Practitioner.

2.  Member of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons.

3.  The holder of a valid—

(a)Certificate or Diploma of the former Public Health Inspectors Education Board, or

(b)Certificate of the former Royal Sanitary Institute and Sanitary Inspectors Examination Joint Board, or

(c)Certificate of the former Sanitary Inspectors Examination Board, or

(d)Certificate in Meat Inspection of the Royal Society for the Promotion of Health, or

(e)Diploma in Environmental Health of the former Environmental Health Officers Education Board, or

(f)Certificate of Registration of the Environmental Health Officers Registration Board, or

(g)Diploma in Environmental Health of the Institution of Environmental Health Officers, or

(h)Certificate of Competency in the Inspection of Meat and Other Foods of the former Royal Sanitary Association of Scotland, or

(i)Certificate or Diploma in Meat and Other Foods of the former Royal Sanitary Association of Scotland, or

(j)Diploma in the Inspection of Meat and Other Foods of the Royal Environmental Health Institute of Scotland, or

(k)Certificate for Meat Detention Officers in Northern Ireland of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons.

Regulation 15

SCHEDULE 7COSTS FOR DETERMINATION OF LOCAL AUTHORITY CHARGES FOR MEAT INSPECTION

1.  The remuneration paid to inspectors engaged in meat inspection in the premises concerned, together with related costs, being employers' National Insurance and superannuation contributions. (Where an inspector is engaged part-time on meat inspection in the premises concerned, such remuneration and costs shall relate to the proportion of time actually engaged in meat inspection in the premises.)

2.  The cost of protective clothing and meat inspection equipment, incuding the cleaning, maintenance and repair of these items, used by inspectors engaged in meat inspection in the premises concerned. (Where such items are not used exclusively in the premises concerned, such costs shall be apportioned according to usage.)

3.  The cost of travel and subsistence incurred by inspectors in respect of their meat inspection duties in relation to the premises concerned. (Where such travel and subsistence does not relate exclusively to meat inspection in the premises concerned, such costs shall be apportioned accordingly.)

4.  The administrative costs incurred by the local authority in respect of meat inspection in the premises concerned.

Regulation 20

SCHEDULE 8REVOCATIONS

Column 1Column 2
Regulations revokedReferences
The Food (Meat Inspection) (Scotland) Regulations 1961S.I. 1961/243
The Food (Meat Inspection) (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 1963S.I. 1963/1231
The Food (Meat Inspection) (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 1976S.I. 1976/874
The Food (Meat Inspection) (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 1979S.I. 1979/1563
The Food (Meat Inspection) (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 1981S.I. 1981/996
The Food (Meat Inspection) (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 1983S.I. 1983/702

Explanatory Note

(This note is not part of the regulations)

These Regulations, which apply to Scotland only, revoke and re-enact with amendments the provisions of the Food (Meat Inspection) (Scotland) Regulations 1961. They apply to fresh meat of domestic bovine animals (including buffalo), swine, sheep, goats, solipeds and farmed deer. They prescribe conditions which must be satisfied for the production of meat intended for sale for human consumption on the domestic market.

In particular, the Regulations—

(a)lay down requirements as to ante-mortem and post-mortem inspection and health marking of such meat (regulations 3 to 6 and Schedules 2 to 4);

(b)make provision for the slaughter of animals elsewhere than in a slaughterhouse (regulations 7 to 9).

Enforcement of the Regulations is the responsibility of local authorities (regulation 18).

They are required—

(a)to determine the hours between which animals may be slaughtered in slaughterhouses (regulation 11);

(b)to make charges for inspections carried out in pursuance of the Regulations (regulations 15 and 16 and Schedule 7); and

(c)to keep records relating to the slaughter of animals in each area (regulation 12 and Schedule 5).

The Regulations also make provision for the qualifications of veterinary meat inspectors and meat inspectors (regulations 13 and 14 and Schedule 6), and for offences and penalties (regulation 19).

(1)

1956 c. 30; section 26(3) was amended by paragraph 123 of Part II of Schedule 27 to the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (c. 65), and by section 22(a) of the Local Government and Planning (Scotland) Act 1982 (c. 43); section 56(8) was amended by, and section 56(8A) inserted by, paragraph 8 of Schedule 15 to the Criminal Justice Act 1982 (c. 48); section 56(8A) was amended by the Law Reform (Miscellaneous Provisions) (Scotland) Act 1985 (c. 73), section 41, and is to be read with section 289B(4) and (6) of the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1975 (c. 21) and S.I. 1984/526

(2)

S.I. 1955/1993, amended by S.I. 1963/1888, 1983/874 and 1984/1205

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