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Merchant Shipping (Safety and Load Line Conventions) Act 1932

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This is the original version (as it was originally enacted).

Cubic Capacity of Lifeboats of Class 1

J. The cubic capacity of a lifeboat of Class I shall be determined by Stirling's (Simpson's) Rule or by any other method giving the same degree of accuracy. The capacity of a square-sterned boat shall be calculated as if the boat had a pointed stern. 2. For example, the capacity in cubic metres (or cubic feet) of a boat, calculated by the aid of Stirling's Rule, may be considered as given by the following formula :—

l being the length of the boat in metres (or feet) from the inside of the planking or plating at the stem to the corresponding point at the stern post; in the case of a boat with a square stern, the length is measured to the inside of the transom. A, B, C denote respectively the areas of the cross-sections at the quarter length forward, amidships, and the quarter length aft, which correspond to the three points obtained by dividing I into four equal parts (the areas corresponding to the two ends of the boat are considered negligible). The areas A, B, C shall be deemed to be given in square metres (or square feet) by the successive application of the following formula to each of the three cross-sections:—

h being the depth measured in metres (or in feet) inside the planking or plating from the keel to the level of the gunwale, or, in certain cases, to a lower level, as determined hereafter. a, b, c, d, e, denote the horizontal breadths of the boat measured in metres (or in feet) at the upper and lower points of the depth and at the three points obtained by dividing h into four equal parts (a and e being the breadths at the extreme points, and c at the middle point, of h). 3. If the sheer of the gunwale, measured at the two points situated at a quarter of the length of the boat from the ends, exceeds 1 per cent. of the length of the boat, the depth employed in calculating the area of the cross-sections A or C shall be deemed to be the depth amidships plus 1 per cent. of the length of the boat. 4. If the depth of the boat amidships exceeds 45 per cent. of the breadth, the depth employed in calculating the area of the midship cross-section B shall be deemed to be equal to 45 per cent. of the breadth, and the depth employed in calculating the areas of the quarter length sections A and C is obtained by increasing this last figure by an amount equal to 1 per cent. of the length of the boat, provided that in no case shall the depths employed in the calculation exceed the actual depths at these points. 5. If the depth of the boat is greater than 122 centimetres (equivalent to 4 feet) the number of persons given by the application of this rule shall be reduced in proportion to the ratio of 122 centimetres to the actual depth, until the boat has been satisfactorily tested afloat with that number of persons on board, all wearing life-jackets. 6. Each Administration shall impose, by suitable formulae, a limit for the number of persons allowed in boats with very fine ends and in boats very full in form. 7. Each Administration reserves the right to assign to a boat a capacity equal to the product of the length, the breadth and the depth multiplied by 0-6 if it is evident that this formula does not give a greater capacity than that obtained by the above method. The dimensions shall then be measured in the following manner:—

Length.—From the intersection of the outside of the planking with the stem to the corresponding point at the stern post or, in the case of a square sterned boat, to the after side of the transom. Breadth.—From the outside of the planking at the point where the breadth of the boat is greatest. Depth.—Amidships inside the planking from the keel to the level of the gunwale, but the depth used in calculating the cubic capacity may not in any case exceed 45 per cent. of the breadth. In all cases the shipowner has the right to require that the cubic capacity of the boat shall be determined by exact measurement. 8. The cubic capacity of a motorboat is obtained from the gross capacity by deducting a volume equal to that occupied by the motor and its accessories, and, when carried, the wireless telegraphy installation and the searchlight with their accessories. Regulation XXXI

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