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Criminal Law (Scotland) Act 1830

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1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F1E+W+S+N.I.
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2 When sentence of capital punishment is passed, a day to be named for carrying it into execution.E+W+S+N.I.

Every sentence of any criminal court importing a capital punishment, if pronounced in Edinburgh or in any other part of Scotland to the southward of the firth or river of Forth, shall specify a day for having the same put to execution, not being less than fifteen days or more than twenty-one days after the date of such sentence; and if pronounced in any place to the northward of the said firth or river of Forth, the day to be so specified shall not be less than twenty days or more than twenty-seven days after the date of such sentence.

3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F2E+W+S+N.I.
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4, 5.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F3E+W+S+N.I.
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6 Transmission of prisoners.E+W+S+N.I.

It shall be lawful for any officer of the law, when lawfully conveying any prisoner to any gaol or before any magistrate, to convey such prisoner through any county adjoining to that over which the magistrate possesses jurisdiction before whom such prisoner is to be carried for examination, or to that in which the gaol is situated to which such prisoner is to be committed, in the same way in all respects as if such officer had been an officer of the county through which he may so pass, and as if the warrant under which he is acting had been granted or indorsed by a magistrate of such county.

7 Officers may cite jurors and witnesses, without witnesses.E+W+S+N.I.

It shall be sufficient for the legal citation of any juror or witness in any [F4civil cause or proceeding], that such citation be given by any officer of the law duly authorized, without witnesses; and the oath of such officer in support of the execution shall be held and received as sufficient evidence of such citation when the same shall be questioned in a court of law.

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8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F5E+W+S+N.I.
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9. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F6E+W+S+N.I.
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10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F7E+W+S+N.I.
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11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F8E+W+S+N.I.
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12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F9E+W+S+N.I.
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13 Provisions of 9 Geo. 4. extended to inferior judges, &c. in certain casesE+W+S+N.I.

The M1Circuit Courts (Scotland) Act 1828 in so far as it provides for rendering all inferior judges and magistrates more safe in the execution of their duty, shall extend to all acts done by any such judge or magistrate in apprehending any party, or in regard to any criminal cause or proceeding, or to any prosecution for a pecuniary penalty.

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14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F10E+W+S+N.I.
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15. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . F11E+W+S+N.I.
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