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The M9/A90/M90 Trunk Road (Kirkliston to Halbeath) (Variable Speed Limits and Actively Managed Hard Shoulder) Regulations 2012

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Citation and commencement

1.  These Regulations may be cited as the M9/A90/M90 Trunk Road (Kirkliston to Halbeath) (Variable Speed Limits and Actively Managed Hard Shoulder) Regulations 2012 and come into force on 1st September 2012.

Interpretation

2.  In these Regulations—

“the 1995 Regulations” means the Motorways Traffic (Scotland) Regulations 1995(1);

“relevant road” means the road known as the M9/A90/M90 Edinburgh to Fraserburgh Trunk Road from Kirkliston at Humbie Rail Bridge to Halbeath.

Variable speed limits

3.—(1) A person must not drive a vehicle on a section of any of the specified lengths of the relevant road to which a variable speed limit applies at a speed exceeding the applicable variable speed limit.

(2) The section of the specified lengths of the relevant road to which a variable speed limit applies is the section of the road—

(a)beginning immediately after a relevant speed limit sign indicating a maximum speed limit other than the national speed limit; and

(b)ending immediately after—

(i)a relevant speed limit sign indicating that another maximum speed limit applies; or

(ii)traffic signs mounted on the same post bearing the words “Variable Speed Limit” and “Ends”.

(3) The applicable variable speed limit is the maximum speed limit indicated by the relevant speed limit sign referred to in paragraph (2)(a)—

(a)when the vehicle passed that sign; or

(b)if higher, the maximum speed limit indicated by that sign ten seconds before the vehicle passed it.

(4) For the purposes of this regulation the relevant speed limit sign is to be taken as not indicating any maximum speed limit if, ten seconds before the vehicle passed it, the sign had not indicated any maximum speed limit.

(5) In this regulation—

“hard shoulder” means a part of the road which is adjacent to and situated on the left hand side of the carriageway, when facing in the direction in which vehicles may be driven in accordance with regulation 5 of the 1995 Regulations, and which is designed to take the weight of a vehicle;

“national speed limit” means any prohibition imposed on a road by regulation 3 of the Motorways Traffic (Speed Limit) Regulations 1974(2);

“relevant speed limit sign” means a traffic sign of the type shown in diagram 670 in Schedule 2 to the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2002(3) which is—

(a)

displayed on a variable message sign which is situated over, on or near any part of a specified length of the relevant road; and

(b)

directed at traffic, on the specified length of road being driven in accordance with regulation 5 of the 1995 Regulations;

“road” includes the adjacent hard shoulder;

“specified lengths of the relevant road” means any of the lengths of the relevant road specified in the Schedule to these Regulations.

Application of 1995 Regulations to the relevant road

4.  In relation to the relevant road the 1995 Regulations apply as if they had been modified as follows—

(a)in regulation 2(1) (interpretation) as if—

(i)in the appropriate places, there were inserted—

“the 2002 Regulations” means the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2002(4);

“actively managed hard shoulder” means the lengths of hard shoulder of the relevant road specified in Schedule 2;

“emergency refuge area” means a part of the relevant road which is—

(a)

adjacent to and situated on the left hand or near side of the actively managed hard shoulder when facing the direction in which vehicles may be driven in accordance with regulation 5; and

(b)

indicated by a marking of the type shown in diagram 1010 in Schedule 6 to the 2002 Regulations;

“permitted vehicle” means a motor vehicle constructed or adapted to carry more than 23 seated passengers (exclusive of the driver);

“relevant road” means the road known as the M9/A90/M90 Edinburgh to Fraserburgh Trunk Road from Kirkliston at Humbie Rail Bridge to Halbeath;;

(ii)in the definition of “carriageway” after the second occurrence of “motorway” there was inserted “(other than the actively managed hard shoulder)”;

(iii)in the definition of “hard shoulder” after “vehicle” there was inserted “(and includes the actively managed hard shoulder);

(b)in regulation 6(2), (3)(a) and (b) (restriction on stopping) as if, in each place where it occurs, for “or in an emergency layby” there was substituted “, in an emergency layby, or emergency refuge area”;

(c)as if for regulation 8 (restriction on the use of hard shoulders or emergency laybys) there was substituted—

8.  Restriction on the use of hard shoulders, emergency laybys or emergency refuge areas

No vehicle may be driven, moved or stopped or remain at rest on any hard shoulder, emergency layby or emergency refuge area except in accordance with regulations 6(2) and (3), 8A and 8B.

8A.  Use of the actively managed hard shoulder

(1) A permitted vehicle may drive on the actively managed hard shoulder as if it were a lane of the carriageway.

(2) Paragraph (1) does not apply when on a gantry directly above the actively managed hard shoulder there is displayed a traffic sign of the type shown in diagram 5003 or 5003.1 in Schedule 10 to, or diagram 6031 in Schedule 11 to, the 2002 Regulations.

(3) Paragraph (2) does not apply to a permitted vehicle which is being driven on the actively managed hard shoulder when any of the traffic signs mentioned in paragraph (2) is displayed until that vehicle passes a gantry displaying one of those signs.

(4) When paragraph (1) applies the actively managed hard shoulder is to be regarded, in relation to a permitted vehicle, as part of the carriageway of the relevant road for the purposes of these Regulations.

(5) Nothing in this regulation affects or prevents the use by any vehicle of the actively managed hard shoulder as a hard shoulder in accordance with regulation 6(2) and (3).

8B.  Use of emergency refuge area on actively managed hard shoulder

(1) When regulation 8A(1) applies, any vehicle using or intending to use the actively managed hard shoulder for the purposes of a hard shoulder in accordance with regulation 6(2) must comply with paragraph (2).

(2) The vehicle must as soon and insofar as reasonably practicable and safe, be driven or moved off the actively managed hard shoulder on to an emergency refuge area.

(3) A vehicle at rest on the emergency refuge area must so far as is reasonably practicable be positioned so that no part of it, or of the load carried by it, obstructs or is a cause of danger to vehicles using the actively managed hard shoulder.;

(d)in regulation 12 (restriction affecting animals carried in vehicles) as if after “emergency layby” there was inserted “, emergency refuge area”; and

(e)as if after the Schedule there was inserted—

Regulation 2(1)

SCHEDULE 2THE ACTIVELY MANAGED HARD SHOULDER OF THE RELEVANT ROAD

1.  The lengths of hard shoulder of the southbound carriageway from the point where the southbound on-slip merges with the southbound carriageway at Junction 2a Halbeath Interchange southwards to the point where the southbound on-slip merges with that carriageway at Junction 1 Admiralty Interchange.

2.  In this Schedule—

(a)a junction followed by a number is a reference to the junction of the M90 of that number;

(b)“the M90” means the motorway known by that name;

(c)“on-slip” means a slip road intended for the use of traffic entering the M90..

KEITH BROWN

Authorised to sign by the Scottish Ministers

St Andrew’s House,

Edinburgh

16th May 2012

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