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Criminal Justice and Licensing (Scotland) Act 2010

2010 asp 13

The Bill for this Act of the Scottish Parliament was passed by the Parliament on 30th June 2010 and received Royal Assent on 6th August 2010

An Act of the Scottish Parliament to make provision about sentencing, offenders and defaulters; to make provision about criminal law, procedure and evidence; to make provision about criminal justice and the investigation of crime (including police functions); to amend the law relating to the licensing of certain activities by local authorities; to amend the law relating to the sale of alcohol; and for connected purposes.

PART 1 SSENTENCING

The Scottish Sentencing CouncilS

1The Scottish Sentencing CouncilS

(1)There is established a body corporate to be known as the “Scottish Sentencing Council” (referred to in this Part as the “Council”).

(2)Schedule 1 makes further provision about the Council.

2The Council's objectivesS

The Council must, in carrying out its functions, seek to—

(a)promote consistency in sentencing practice,

(b)assist the development of policy in relation to sentencing,

(c)promote greater awareness and understanding of sentencing policy and practice.

3Sentencing guidelinesS

(1)The Council is from time to time to prepare, for the approval of the High Court of Justiciary, guidelines relating to the sentencing of offenders.

(2)Such guidelines are to be known as “sentencing guidelines”.

(3)Sentencing guidelines may in particular relate to—

(a)the principles and purposes of sentencing,

(b)sentencing levels,

(c)the particular types of sentence that are appropriate for particular types of offence or offender,

(d)the circumstances in which the guidelines may be departed from.

(4)Sentencing guidelines may be general in nature or may relate to a particular category of offence or offender or a particular matter relating to sentencing.

(5)The Council must, on preparing any sentencing guidelines, also prepare—

(a)an assessment of the costs and benefits to which the implementation of the guidelines would be likely to give rise,

(b)an assessment of the likely effect of the guidelines on the criminal justice system generally.

(6)The Council—

(a)must from time to time review any sentencing guidelines published by it, and

(b)may prepare, for the approval of the High Court of Justiciary, revised guidelines.

(7)In this section and sections 4 to 13, references to sentencing guidelines include references to revised sentencing guidelines.

4Consultation on proposed sentencing guidelinesS

(1)The Council must, before submitting any sentencing guidelines to the High Court of Justiciary for approval—

(a)publish a draft of the proposed guidelines together with a draft of the assessments referred to in section 3(5), and

(b)consult the following persons about the drafts—

(i)the Scottish Ministers,

(ii)the Lord Advocate,

(iii)such other persons as the Council considers appropriate.

(2)The Council must, in finalising the guidelines and assessments for submission to the High Court of Justiciary, have regard to any comments made on the drafts following publication and consultation under subsection (1).

5Approval of sentencing guidelines by High CourtS

(1)Sentencing guidelines have no effect unless approved by the High Court of Justiciary.

(2)On submitting sentencing guidelines to the High Court for approval, the Council must also provide the High Court with the assessments referred to in section 3(5).

(3)Where the Council submits sentencing guidelines to the High Court for approval, the Court may—

(a)approve the proposed guidelines—

(i)in whole or in part,

(ii)with or without modifications, or

(b)reject the proposed guidelines, in whole or in part.

(4)Where the High Court—

(a)rejects any of the proposed guidelines, or

(b)modifies any of them,

the Court must state its reasons for doing so.

(5)Sentencing guidelines approved by the High Court take effect on such date as the Court may determine.

(6)Different dates may be determined in relation to—

(a)different provisions of the guidelines, or

(b)different purposes.

(7)As soon as possible after the approval of sentencing guidelines by the High Court, the Council must publish—

(a)the guidelines as approved (including the date on which they take effect), and

(b)the assessments referred to in section 3(5) (revised as necessary to take account of any modifications of the guidelines prior to their approval).

(8)The guidelines and assessments are to be published in such manner as the Council considers appropriate.

6Effect of sentencing guidelinesS

(1)A court (whether at first instance or on appeal) must—

(a)in sentencing an offender in respect of an offence, have regard to any sentencing guidelines which are applicable in relation to the case,

(b)in carrying out any other function relating to the sentencing of offenders, have regard to any sentencing guidelines applicable to the carrying out of the function.

(2)If the court decides not to follow the guidelines, or to depart from them in accordance with provision contained in them under section 3(3)(d), it must state the reasons for its decision.

(3)The sentencing guidelines to which the court must have regard under subsection (1) are those applicable to the case at the time the court is sentencing the offender or, as the case may be, carrying out the function.

(4)Subsection (5) applies where, on appeal in any case, the High Court of Justiciary passes another sentence under one of the following provisions of the 1995 Act—

(a)section 118(3),

(b)section 118(4)(b),

(c)section 118(4A)(b),

(d)section 118(4A)(c)(ii),

(e)section 189(1)(b).

(5)The sentencing guidelines which the High Court must have regard to under subsection (1) in passing that other sentence are those applicable to the case at the time it is passed.

(6)A revision of the sentencing guidelines after an offender is sentenced in respect of an offence is not a ground for the referral of the case to the High Court of Justiciary under section 194B of the 1995 Act (references to the High Court of cases dealt with on indictment).

(7)In section 108 of the 1995 Act (Lord Advocate's right of appeal against disposal where conviction on indictment), after subsection (2) insert—

(2A)In deciding whether to appeal under subsection (1) in any case, the Lord Advocate must have regard to any sentencing guidelines which are applicable in relation to the case..

(8)In section 175 of the 1995 Act (prosecutor's right of appeal against disposal in summary proceedings), after subsection (4B) insert—

(4C)In deciding whether to appeal under subsection (4) in any case, the prosecutor must have regard to any sentencing guidelines which are applicable in relation to the case..

7Ministers' power to request that sentencing guidelines be prepared or reviewedS

(1)The Scottish Ministers may request that the Council consider—

(a)preparing, for the approval of the High Court of Justiciary, sentencing guidelines on any matter, or

(b)reviewing any sentencing guidelines published by the Council.

(2)The Council must have regard to any request made by the Scottish Ministers.

(3)If the Council decides not to comply with a request made by the Scottish Ministers, it must provide the Scottish Ministers with reasons for its decision.

8High Court's power to require preparation or review of sentencing guidelinesS

(1)Where the High Court of Justiciary pronounces an opinion under section 118(7) or 189(7) of the 1995 Act, the Court may require the Council to—

(a)prepare, for the Court's approval, sentencing guidelines on any matter, or

(b)review any sentencing guidelines published by the Council on any matter.

(2)On making a requirement under subsection (1), the High Court must state its reasons for doing so.

(3)The Council must comply with a requirement made under subsection (1) and, in doing so, must have regard to the High Court's reasons for making the requirement.

9Publication of High Court guideline judgmentsS

(1)The Council must publish the opinions of the High Court of Justiciary pronounced under section 118(7) or 189(7) of the 1995 Act.

(2)As soon as possible after the High Court pronounces such an opinion, the Scottish Court Service must provide the Council with a copy of the opinion.

(3)The copy opinion is to be provided in such form and by such means as the Council may require.

(4)The opinions are to be published in such manner, and at such times, as the Council considers appropriate.

(5)This section does not affect any power or responsibility of the Scottish Court Service in relation to the publication of opinions of the High Court.

10Scottish Court Service to provide sentencing information to the CouncilS

(1)The Scottish Court Service must provide the Council with such information relating to the sentences imposed by courts as the Council may reasonably require for the purposes of its functions.

(2)The information must be provided in such form and by such means as the Council may require.

(3)The Council must from time to time publish information about the sentences imposed by courts.

11The Council's power to provide information, advice etc.S

(1)The Council may—

(a)publish or otherwise disseminate information about sentencing matters,

(b)provide advice or guidance of a general nature about such matters,

(c)conduct research into such matters.

(2)In this section, “sentencing matters” means—

(a)sentencing guidelines,

(b)the practice of the courts in relation to sentencing, and

(c)any other matter relating to sentencing.

12Business planS

(1)The Council must, before the submission day for each period of 3 years, prepare and submit to the Scottish Ministers a plan (a “business plan”) describing how the Council proposes to carry out its functions during the period.

(2)The “submission day” is—

(a)for the period of 3 years beginning on the day on which this section comes into force, the day specified by order made by the Scottish Ministers,

(b)for each succeeding period of 3 years, the first day of the period.

(3)A business plan must—

(a)be prepared in such form as the Scottish Ministers may direct,

(b)contain the information specified in subsection (4) and such other information as they may direct, and

(c)be submitted by such time as they may direct.

(4)The information referred to in subsection (3)(b) is details of the matters in relation to which the Council proposes to prepare sentencing guidelines.

(5)The Council may include in a business plan such other information as it considers appropriate.

(6)In preparing a business plan, the Council must consult—

(a)the Scottish Ministers,

(b)the Lord Advocate,

(c)the Lord Justice General, and

(d)such other persons as it considers appropriate.

(7)The Scottish Ministers must lay before the Scottish Parliament each business plan submitted to them.

(8)The Council must, as soon as practicable after a business plan has been laid before the Parliament, publish it in such manner as it considers appropriate.

(9)The Council may at any time during a period covered by a business plan review the plan for the period and submit to the Scottish Ministers a revised plan.

(10)Subsections (3) to (8) apply to a revised plan as they apply to a business plan.

13Annual reportS

(1)The Council must, as soon as practicable after the end of each financial year, prepare and submit to the Scottish Ministers a report on the carrying out of its functions during the year.

(2)The report must—

(a)be prepared in such form as the Scottish Ministers may direct,

(b)contain the information specified in subsection (3) and such other information as they may direct, and

(c)be submitted by such time as they may direct.

(3)The information referred to in subsection (2)(b) is details of—

(a)the sentencing guidelines published or revised during the year (if any),

(b)any sentencing guidelines submitted during the year to the High Court of Justiciary for approval and of the Court's response to them,

(c)any draft sentencing guidelines being consulted upon,

(d)requests made by the Scottish Ministers under section 7 and of the Council's response to them, and

(e)requirements made by the High Court of Justiciary under section 8 and of the Council's response to them.

(4)The Council may include in the report such other information as it considers appropriate.

(5)The Scottish Ministers must lay before the Scottish Parliament each report submitted to them.

(6)The Council must, as soon as practicable after the report has been laid before the Parliament, publish it in such manner as it considers appropriate.

Community payback ordersS

14Community payback ordersS

(1)After section 227 of the 1995 Act insert—

Community payback ordersS
227ACommunity payback orders

(1)Where a person (the “offender”) is convicted of an offence punishable by imprisonment, the court may, instead of imposing a sentence of imprisonment, impose a community payback order on the offender.

(2)A community payback order is an order imposing one or more of the following requirements—

(a)an offender supervision requirement,

(b)a compensation requirement,

(c)an unpaid work or other activity requirement,

(d)a programme requirement,

(e)a residence requirement,

(f)a mental health treatment requirement,

(g)a drug treatment requirement,

(h)an alcohol treatment requirement,

(i)a conduct requirement.

(3)Subsection (4) applies where—

(a)a person (the “offender”) is convicted of an offence punishable by a fine (whether or not it is also punishable by imprisonment), and

(b)where the offence is also punishable by imprisonment, the court decides not to impose—

(i)a sentence of imprisonment, or

(ii)a community payback order under subsection (1) instead of a sentence of imprisonment.

(4)The court may, instead of or as well as imposing a fine, impose a community payback order on the offender imposing one or more of the following requirements—

(a)an offender supervision requirement,

(b)a level 1 unpaid work or other activity requirement,

(c)a conduct requirement.

(5)A justice of the peace court may only impose a community payback order imposing one or more of the following requirements—

(a)an offender supervision requirement,

(b)a compensation requirement,

(c)an unpaid work or other activity requirement,

(d)a residence requirement,

(e)a conduct requirement.

(6)Subsection (5)(c) is subject to section 227J(4).

(7)The Scottish Ministers may by order made by statutory instrument amend subsection (5) so as to add to or omit requirements that may be imposed by a community payback order imposed by a justice of the peace court.

(8)An order is not to be made under subsection (7) unless a draft of the statutory instrument containing the order has been laid before and approved by resolution of the Scottish Parliament.

(9)In this section and sections 227B to 227ZK, except where the context requires otherwise—

  • court” means the High Court, the sheriff or a justice of the peace court,

  • imprisonment” includes detention.

227BCommunity payback order: procedure prior to imposition

(1)This section applies where a court is considering imposing a community payback order on an offender.

(2)The court must not impose the order unless it is of the opinion that the offence, or the combination of the offence and one or more offences associated with it, was serious enough to warrant the imposition of such an order.

(3)Before imposing a community payback order imposing two or more requirements, the court must consider whether, in the circumstances of the case, the requirements are compatible with each other.

(4)The court must not impose the order unless it has obtained, and taken account of, a report from an officer of a local authority containing information about the offender and the offender's circumstances.

(5)An Act of Adjournal may prescribe—

(a)the form of a report under subsection (4), and

(b)the particular information to be contained in it.

(6)Subsection (4) does not apply where the court is considering imposing a community payback order—

(a)imposing only a level 1 unpaid work or other activity requirement, or

(b)under section 227M(2).

(7)The clerk of the court must give a copy of any report obtained under subsection (4) to—

(a)the offender,

(b)the offender's solicitor (if any), and

(c)the prosecutor.

(8)Before imposing the order, the court must explain to the offender in ordinary language—

(a)the purpose and effect of each of the requirements to be imposed by the order,

(b)the consequences which may follow if the offender fails to comply with any of the requirements imposed by the order, and

(c)where the court proposes to include in the order provision under section 227X for it to be reviewed, the arrangements for such a review.

(9)The court must not impose the order unless the offender has, after the court has explained those matters, confirmed that the offender—

(a)understands those matters, and

(b)is willing to comply with each of the requirements to be imposed by the order.

(10)Subsection (9)(b) does not apply where the court is considering imposing a community payback order under section 227M(2).

227CCommunity payback order: responsible officer

(1)This section applies where a court imposes a community payback order on an offender.

(2)The court must, in imposing the order—

(a)specify the locality in which the offender resides or will reside for the duration of the order,

(b)require the local authority within whose area that locality is situated to nominate, within two days of its receiving a copy of the order, an officer of the authority as the responsible officer for the purposes of the order,

(c)require the offender to comply with any instructions given by the responsible officer—

(i)about keeping in touch with the responsible officer, or

(ii)for the purposes of subsection (3),

(d)require the offender to report to the responsible officer in accordance with instructions given by that officer,

(e)require the offender to notify the responsible officer without delay of—

(i)any change of the offender's address, and

(ii)the times, if any, at which the offender usually works (or carries out voluntary work) or attends school or any other educational establishment, and

(f)where the order imposes an unpaid work or other activity requirement, require the offender to undertake for the number of hours specified in the requirement such work or activity as the responsible officer may instruct, and at such times as may be so instructed.

(3)The responsible officer is responsible for—

(a)making any arrangements necessary to enable the offender to comply with each of the requirements imposed by the order,

(b)promoting compliance with those requirements by the offender,

(c)taking such steps as may be necessary to enforce compliance with the requirements of the order or to vary, revoke or discharge the order.

(4)References in this Act to the responsible officer are, in relation to an offender on whom a community payback order has been imposed, the officer for the time being nominated in pursuance of subsection (2)(b).

(5)In reckoning the period of two days for the purposes of subsection (2)(b), no account is to be taken of a Saturday or Sunday or any day which is a local or public holiday in the area of the local authority concerned.

227DCommunity payback order: further provision

(1)Where a community payback order is imposed on an offender, the order is to be taken for all purposes to be a sentence imposed on the offender.

(2)On imposing a community payback order, the court must state in open court the reasons for imposing the order.

(3)The imposition by a court of a community payback order on an offender does not prevent the court imposing a fine or any other sentence (other than imprisonment), or making any other order, that it would be entitled to impose or make in respect of the offence.

(4)Where a court imposes a community payback order on an offender, the clerk of the court must ensure that—

(a)a copy of the order is given to—

(i)the offender, and

(ii)the local authority within whose area the offender resides or will reside, and

(b)a copy of the order and such other documents and information relating to the case as may be useful are given to the clerk of the appropriate court (unless the court imposing the order is that court).

(5)A copy of the order may be given to the offender—

(a)by being delivered personally to the offender, or

(b)by being sent—

(i)by a registered post service (as defined in section 125(1) of the Postal Services Act 2000 (c.26)), or

(ii)by a postal service which provides for the delivery of the document to be recorded.

(6)A community payback order is to be in such form, or as nearly as may be in such form, as may be prescribed by Act of Adjournal.

227ERequirement to avoid conflict with religious beliefs, work etc.

(1)In imposing a community payback order on an offender, the court must ensure, so far as practicable, that any requirement imposed by the order avoids—

(a)a conflict with the offender's religious beliefs,

(b)interference with the times, if any, at which the offender normally works (or carries out voluntary work) or attends school or any other educational establishment.

(2)The responsible officer must ensure, so far as practicable, that any instruction given to the offender avoids such a conflict or interference.

227FPayment of offenders' travelling and other expenses

(1)The Scottish Ministers may by order made by statutory instrument provide for the payment to offenders of travelling or other expenses in connection with their compliance with requirements imposed on them by community payback orders.

(2)An order under subsection (1) may—

(a)specify expenses or provide for them to be determined under the order,

(b)provide for the payments to be made by or on behalf of local authorities,

(c)make different provision for different purposes.

(3)An order under subsection (1) is subject to annulment in pursuance of a resolution of the Scottish Parliament.

Offender supervision requirementS
227GOffender supervision requirement

(1)In this Act, an “offender supervision requirement” is, in relation to an offender, a requirement that, during the specified period, the offender must attend appointments with the responsible officer or another person determined by the responsible officer, at such time and place as may be determined by the responsible officer, for the purpose of promoting the offender's rehabilitation.

(2)On imposing a community payback order, the court must impose an offender supervision requirement if—

(a)the offender is under 18 years of age at the time the order is imposed, or

(b)the court, in the order, imposes—

(i)a compensation requirement,

(ii)a programme requirement,

(iii)a residence requirement,

(iv)a mental health requirement,

(v)a drug treatment requirement,

(vi)an alcohol treatment requirement, or

(vii)a conduct requirement.

(3)The specified period must be at least 6 months and not more than 3 years.

(4)Subsection (3) is subject to subsection (5) and section 227ZE(4).

(5)In the case of an offender supervision requirement imposed on a person aged 16 or 17 along with only a level 1 unpaid work or other activity requirement, the specified period must be no more than whichever is the greater of—

(a)the specified period under section 227L in relation to the level 1 unpaid work or other activity requirement, and

(b)3 months.

(6)In this section, “specified”, in relation to an offender supervision requirement, means specified in the requirement.

Compensation requirementS
227HCompensation requirement

(1)In this Act, a “compensation requirement” is, in relation to an offender, a requirement that the offender must pay compensation for any relevant matter in favour of a relevant person.

(2)In subsection (1)—

  • relevant matter” means any personal injury, loss, damage or other matter in respect of which a compensation order could be made against the offender under section 249 of this Act, and

  • relevant person” means a person in whose favour the compensation could be awarded by such a compensation order.

(3)A compensation requirement may require the compensation to be paid in a lump sum or in instalments.

(4)The offender must complete payment of the compensation before the earlier of the following—

(a)the end of the period of 18 months beginning with the day on which the compensation requirement is imposed,

(b)the beginning of the period of 2 months ending with the day on which the offender supervision requirement imposed under section 227G(2) ends.

(5)The following provisions of this Act apply in relation to a compensation requirement as they apply in relation to a compensation order, and as if the references in them to a compensation order included a compensation requirement—

(a)section 249(3), (4), (5) and (8) to (10),

(b)section 250(2),

(c)section 251(1), (1A) and (2)(b), and

(d)section 253.

Unpaid work or other activity requirementS
227IUnpaid work or other activity requirement

(1)In this Act, an “unpaid work or other activity requirement” is, in relation to an offender, a requirement that the offender must, for the specified number of hours, undertake—

(a)unpaid work, or

(b)unpaid work and other activity.

(2)Whether the offender must undertake other activity as well as unpaid work is for the responsible officer to determine.

(3)The nature of the unpaid work and any other activity to be undertaken by the offender is to be determined by the responsible officer.

(4)The number of hours that may be specified in the requirement must be (in total)—

(a)at least 20 hours, and

(b)not more than 300 hours.

(5)An unpaid work or other activity requirement which requires the work or activity to be undertaken for a number of hours totalling no more than 100 is referred to in this Act as a “level 1 unpaid work or other activity requirement”.

(6)An unpaid work or other activity requirement which requires the work or activity to be undertaken for a number of hours totalling more than 100 is referred to in this Act as a “level 2 unpaid work or other activity requirement”.

(7)The Scottish Ministers may by order made by statutory instrument substitute another number of hours for any of the numbers of hours for the time being specified in subsections (4) to (6).

(8)An order under subsection (7) may only substitute for the number of hours for the time being specified in a provision mentioned in the first column of the following table a number of hours falling within the range set out in the corresponding entry in the second column.

ProvisionRange
No fewer thanNo more than
Subsection (4)(a)10 hours40 hours
Subsection (4)(b)250 hours350 hours
Subsections (5) and (6)70 hours150 hours

(9)An order under subsection (7) is subject to annulment in pursuance of a resolution of the Scottish Parliament.

(10)In this section, “specified”, in relation to an unpaid work or other activity requirement, means specified in the requirement.

227JUnpaid work or other activity requirement: further provision

(1)A court may not impose an unpaid work or other activity requirement on an offender who is under 16 years of age.

(2)A court may impose such a requirement on an offender only if the court is satisfied, after considering the report mentioned in section 227B(4), that the offender is a suitable person to undertake unpaid work in pursuance of the requirement.

(3)Subsection (2) does not apply where the court is considering imposing a community payback order—

(a)imposing only a level 1 unpaid work or other activity requirement, or

(b)under section 227M(2).

(4)A justice of the peace court may impose a level 2 unpaid work or other activity requirement only if—

(a)the Scottish Ministers by regulations made by statutory instrument so provide, and

(b)the requirement is imposed in such circumstances and subject to such conditions as may be specified in the regulations.

(5)Regulations are not to be made under subsection (4) unless a draft of the statutory instrument containing them has been laid before and approved by resolution of the Scottish Parliament.

227KAllocation of hours between unpaid work and other activity

(1)Subject to subsection (2), it is for the responsible officer to determine how many out of the number of hours specified in an unpaid work or other activity requirement are to be allocated to undertaking, respectively—

(a)unpaid work, and

(b)any other activity to be undertaken.

(2)The number of hours allocated to undertaking an activity other than unpaid work must not exceed whichever is the lower of—

(a)30% of the number of hours specified in the requirement, and

(b)30 hours.

(3)The Scottish Ministers may by order made by statutory instrument—

(a)substitute another percentage for the percentage for the time being specified in subsection (2)(a),

(b)substitute another number of hours for the number of hours for the time being specified in subsection (2)(b).

(4)An order is not to be made under subsection (3) unless a draft of the statutory instrument containing the order has been laid before and approved by resolution of the Scottish Parliament.

227LTime limit for completion of unpaid work or other activity

(1)The number of hours of unpaid work and any other activity that the offender is required to undertake in pursuance of an unpaid work or other activity requirement must be completed by the offender before the end of the specified period beginning with the imposition of the requirement.

(2)The “specified period” is—

(a)in relation to a level 1 unpaid work or other activity requirement, 3 months or such longer period as the court may specify in the requirement,

(b)in relation to a level 2 unpaid work or other activity requirement, 6 months or such longer period as the court may specify in the requirement.

227MFine defaulters

(1)This section applies where—

(a)a fine has been imposed on an offender in respect of an offence,

(b)the offender fails to pay the fine or an instalment of the fine,

(c)the offender is not serving a sentence of imprisonment, and

(d)apart from this section, the court would have imposed a period of imprisonment on the offender under section 219(1) of this Act in respect of the failure to pay the fine or instalment.

(2)Instead of imposing a period of imprisonment under section 219(1) of this Act, the court—

(a)where the amount of the fine or the instalment does not exceed level 2 on the standard scale, must impose a community payback order on the offender imposing a level 1 unpaid work or other activity requirement,

(b)where the amount of the fine or the instalment exceeds that level, may impose such a community payback order.

(3)The court, in imposing a community payback order under subsection (2) on a person aged 16 or 17, must also impose an offender supervision requirement.

(4)Where the amount of the fine or the instalment does not exceed level 1 on the standard scale, the number of hours specified in the requirement must not exceed 50.

(5)On completion of the hours of unpaid work and any other activity specified in an unpaid work or other activity requirement imposed under this section, the fine in respect of which the requirement was imposed is discharged (or, as the case may be, the outstanding instalments of the fine are discharged).

(6)If, after a community payback order is imposed on an offender under this section, the offender pays the fine or the full amount of any outstanding instalments, the appropriate court must discharge the order.

(7)Subsection (2) is subject to sections 227J(1) and 227N(2), (3) and (7).

(8)In this section, “court” does not include the High Court.

227NOffenders subject to more than one unpaid work or other activity requirement

(1)This section applies where—

(a)a court is considering imposing an unpaid work or other activity requirement on an offender (referred to as the “new requirement”), and

(b)at the time the court is considering imposing the requirement, there is already in effect one or more community payback orders imposing such a requirement on the same offender (each referred to as an “existing requirement”).

(2)The court may, in imposing the new requirement, direct that it is to be concurrent with any existing requirement.

(3)Where the court makes a direction under subsection (2), hours of unpaid work or other activity undertaken after the new requirement is imposed count for the purposes of compliance with that requirement and the existing requirement.

(4)Subsection (5) applies where the court does not make a direction under subsection (2).

(5)The maximum number of hours which may be specified in the new requirement is the number of hours specified in section 227I(4)(b) less the aggregate of the number of hours of unpaid work or activity still to be completed under each existing requirement at the time the new requirement is imposed.

(6)In calculating that aggregate, if any existing requirement is concurrent with another (by virtue of a direction under subsection (2)), hours that count for the purposes of compliance with both (or, as the case may be, all) are to be counted only once.

(7)Where that maximum number is less than the minimum number of hours that can be specified by virtue of section 227I(4)(a), the court must not impose the new requirement.

227ORules about unpaid work and other activity

(1)The Scottish Ministers may make rules by statutory instrument for or in connection with the undertaking of unpaid work and other activities in pursuance of unpaid work or other activity requirements.

(2)Rules under subsection (1) may in particular make provision for—

(a)limiting the number of hours of work or other activity that an offender may be required to undertake in any one day,

(b)reckoning the time spent undertaking unpaid work or other activity,

(c)the keeping of records of unpaid work and any other activity undertaken.

(3)Rules under subsection (1) may—

(a)confer functions on responsible officers,

(b)contain rules about the way responsible officers are to exercise functions under this Act.

(4)Rules under subsection (1) are subject to annulment in pursuance of a resolution of the Scottish Parliament.

Programme requirementS
227PProgramme requirement

(1)In this Act, a “programme requirement” is, in relation to an offender, a requirement that the offender must participate in a specified programme, at the specified place and on the specified number of days.

(2)In this section, “programme” means a course or other planned set of activities, taking place over a period of time, and provided to individuals or groups of individuals for the purpose of addressing offending behavioural needs.

(3)A court may impose a programme requirement on an offender only if the specified programme is one which has been recommended by an officer of a local authority as being suitable for the offender to participate in.

(4)If an offender's compliance with a proposed programme requirement would involve the co-operation of a person other than the offender, the court may impose the requirement only if the other person consents.

(5)A court may not impose a programme requirement that would require an offender to participate in a specified programme after the expiry of the period specified in the offender supervision requirement to be imposed at the same time as the programme requirement (by virtue of section 227G(2)(b)).

(6)Where the court imposes a programme requirement on an offender, the requirement is to be taken to include a requirement that the offender, while attending the specified programme, complies with any instructions given by or on behalf of the person in charge of the programme.

(7)In this section, “specified”, in relation to a programme requirement, means specified in the requirement.

Residence requirementS
227QResidence requirement

(1)In this Act, a “residence requirement” is, in relation to an offender, a requirement that, during the specified period, the offender must reside at a specified place.

(2)The court may, in a residence requirement, require an offender to reside at a hostel or other institution only if the hostel or institution has been recommended as a suitable place for the offender to reside in by an officer of a local authority.

(3)The specified period must not be longer than the period specified in the offender supervision requirement to be imposed at the same time as the residence requirement (by virtue of section 227G(2)(b)).

(4)In this section, “specified”, in relation to a residence requirement, means specified in the requirement.

Mental health treatment requirementS
227RMental health treatment requirement

(1)In this Act, a “mental health treatment requirement” is, in relation to an offender, a requirement that the offender must submit, during the specified period, to treatment by or under the direction of a registered medical practitioner or a registered psychologist (or both) with a view to improving the offender's mental condition.

(2)The treatment to which an offender may be required to submit under a mental health treatment requirement is such of the kinds of treatment described in subsection (3) as is specified; but otherwise the nature of the treatment is not to be specified.

(3)Those kinds of treatment are—

(a)treatment as a resident patient in a hospital (other than a State hospital) within the meaning of the Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003 (asp 13) (“the 2003 Act”),

(b)treatment as a non-resident patient at such institution or other place as may be specified, or

(c)treatment by or under the direction of such registered medical practitioner or registered psychologist as may be specified.

(4)A court may impose a mental health treatment requirement on an offender only if the court is satisfied—

(a)on the written or oral evidence of an approved medical practitioner (within the meaning of the 2003 Act), that Condition A is met,

(b)on the written or oral evidence of the registered medical practitioner or registered psychologist by whom or under whose direction the treatment is to be provided, that Condition B is met, and

(c)that Condition C is met.

(5)Condition A is that—

(a)the offender suffers from a mental condition,

(b)the condition requires, and may be susceptible to, treatment, and

(c)the condition is not such as to warrant the offender's being subject to—

(i)a compulsory treatment order under section 64 of the 2003 Act, or

(ii)a compulsion order under section 57A of this Act.

(6)Condition B is that the treatment proposed to be specified is appropriate for the offender.

(7)Condition C is that arrangements have been made for the proposed treatment including, where the treatment is to be of the kind mentioned in subsection (3)(a), arrangements for the offender's reception in the hospital proposed to be specified in the requirement.

(8)The specified period must not be longer than the period specified in the offender supervision requirement to be imposed at the same time as the mental health treatment requirement (by virtue of section 227G(2)(b)).

(9)In this section, “specified”, in relation to a mental health treatment requirement, means specified in the requirement.

227SMental health treatment requirements: medical evidence

(1)For the purposes of section 227R(4)(a) or (b), a written report purporting to be signed by an approved medical practitioner (within the meaning of the Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003 (asp 13)) may be received in evidence without the need for proof of the signature or qualifications of the practitioner.

(2)Where such a report is lodged in evidence otherwise than by or on behalf of the offender, a copy of the report must be given to—

(a)the offender, and

(b)the offender's solicitor (if any).

(3)The court may adjourn the case if it considers it necessary to do so to give the offender further time to consider the report.

(4)Subsection (5) applies where the offender is—

(a)detained in a hospital under this Act, or

(b)remanded in custody.

(5)For the purpose of calling evidence to rebut any evidence contained in a report lodged as mentioned in subsection (2), arrangements may be made by or on behalf of the offender for an examination of the offender by a registered medical practitioner.

(6)Such an examination is to be carried out in private.

227TPower to change treatment

(1)This section applies where—

(a)a mental health treatment requirement has been imposed on an offender, and

(b)the registered medical practitioner or registered psychologist by whom or under whose direction the offender is receiving the treatment to which the offender is required to submit in pursuance of the requirement is of the opinion mentioned in subsection (2).

(2)That opinion is—

(a)that the offender requires, or that it would be appropriate for the offender to receive, a different kind of treatment (whether in whole or in part) from that which the offender has been receiving, or

(b)that the treatment (whether in whole or in part) can be more appropriately given in or at a different hospital or other institution or place from that where the offender has been receiving treatment.

(3)The practitioner or, as the case may be, psychologist may make arrangements for the offender to be treated accordingly.

(4)Subject to subsection (5), the treatment provided under the arrangements must be of a kind which could have been specified in the mental health treatment requirement.

(5)The arrangements may provide for the offender to receive treatment (in whole or in part) as a resident patient in an institution or place even though it is one that could not have been specified for that purpose in the mental health treatment requirement.

(6)Arrangements may be made under subsection (3) only if—

(a)the offender and the responsible officer agree to the arrangements,

(b)the treatment will be given by or under the direction of a registered medical practitioner or registered psychologist who has agreed to accept the offender as a patient, and

(c)where the treatment requires the offender to be a resident patient, the offender will be received as such.

(7)Where arrangements are made under subsection (3)—

(a)the responsible officer must notify the court of the arrangements, and

(b)the treatment provided under the arrangements is to be taken to be treatment to which the offender is required to submit under the mental health treatment requirement.

Drug treatment requirementS
227UDrug treatment requirement

(1)In this Act, a “drug treatment requirement” is, in relation to an offender, a requirement that the offender must submit, during the specified period, to treatment by or under the direction of a specified person with a view to reducing or eliminating the offender's dependency on, or propensity to misuse, drugs.

(2)The treatment to which an offender may be required to submit under a drug treatment requirement is such of the kinds of treatment described in subsection (3) as is specified (but otherwise the nature of the treatment is not to be specified).

(3)Those kinds of treatment are—

(a)treatment as a resident in such institution or other place as is specified,

(b)treatment as a non-resident at such institution or other place, and at such intervals, as is specified.

(4)The specified person must be a person who has the necessary qualifications or experience in relation to the treatment to be provided.

(5)The specified period must not be longer than the period specified in the offender supervision requirement to be imposed at the same time as the drug treatment requirement (by virtue of section 227G(2)(b)).

(6)A court may impose a drug treatment requirement on an offender only if the court is satisfied that—

(a)the offender is dependent on, or has a propensity to misuse, any controlled drug (as defined in section 2(1)(a) of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 (c.38)),

(b)the dependency or propensity requires, and may be susceptible to, treatment, and

(c)arrangements have been, or can be, made for the proposed treatment including, where the treatment is to be of the kind mentioned in subsection (3)(a), arrangements for the offender's reception in the institution or other place to be specified.

(7)In this section, “specified”, in relation to a drug treatment requirement, means specified in the requirement.

Alcohol treatment requirementS
227VAlcohol treatment requirement

(1)In this Act, an “alcohol treatment requirement” is, in relation to an offender, a requirement that the offender must submit, during the specified period, to treatment by or under the direction of a specified person with a view to the reduction or elimination of the offender's dependency on alcohol.

(2)The treatment to which an offender may be required to submit under an alcohol treatment requirement is such of the kinds of treatment described in subsection (3) as is specified (but otherwise the nature of the treatment is not to be specified).

(3)Those kinds of treatment are—

(a)treatment as a resident in such institution or other place as is specified,

(b)treatment as a non-resident at such institution or other place, and at such intervals, as is specified,

(c)treatment by or under the direction of such person as is specified.

(4)The person specified under subsection (1) or (3)(c) must be a person who has the necessary qualifications or experience in relation to the treatment to be provided.

(5)The specified period must not be longer than the period specified in the offender supervision requirement to be imposed at the same time as the alcohol treatment requirement (by virtue of section 227G(2)(b)).

(6)A court may impose an alcohol treatment requirement on an offender only if the court is satisfied that—

(a)the offender is dependent on alcohol,

(b)the dependency requires, and may be susceptible to, treatment, and

(c)arrangements have been, or can be, made for the proposed treatment, including, where the treatment is to be of the kind mentioned in subsection (3)(a), arrangements for the offender's reception in the institution or other place to be specified.

(7)In this section, “specified”, in relation to an alcohol treatment requirement, means specified in the requirement.

Conduct requirementS
227WConduct requirement

(1)In this Act, a “conduct requirement” is, in relation to an offender, a requirement that the offender must, during the specified period, do or refrain from doing specified things.

(2)A court may impose a conduct requirement on an offender only if the court is satisfied that the requirement is necessary with a view to—

(a)securing or promoting good behaviour by the offender, or

(b)preventing further offending by the offender.

(3)The specified period must be not more than 3 years.

(4)The specified things must not include anything that—

(a)could be required by imposing one of the other requirements listed in section 227A(2), or

(b)would be inconsistent with the provisions of this Act relating to such other requirements.

(5)In this section, “specified”, in relation to a conduct requirement, means specified in the requirement.

Community payback orders: review, variation etc.S
227XPeriodic review of community payback orders

(1)On imposing a community payback order on an offender, the court may include in the order provision for the order to be reviewed at such time or times as may be specified in the order.

(2)A review carried out in pursuance of such provision is referred to in this section as a “progress review”.

(3)A progress review may be carried out by the court which imposed the community payback order or (if different) the appropriate court, and, where those courts are different, the court must specify in the order which of those courts is to carry out the reviews.

(4)A progress review is to be carried out in such manner as the court carrying out the review may determine.

(5)Before each progress review, the responsible officer must give the court a written report on the offender's compliance with the requirements imposed by the community payback order in the period to which the review relates.

(6)The offender must attend each progress review.

(7)If the offender fails to attend a progress review, the court may—

(a)issue a citation requiring the offender's attendance, or

(b)issue a warrant for the offender's arrest.

(8)The unified citation provisions apply in relation to a citation under subsection (7)(a) as they apply in relation to a citation under section 216(3)(a) of this Act.

(9)Subsections (10) and (11) apply where, in the course of carrying out a progress review in respect of a community payback order, it appears to the court that the offender has failed to comply with a requirement imposed by the order.

(10)The court must—

(a)provide the offender with written details of the alleged failure,

(b)inform the offender that the offender is entitled to be legally represented, and

(c)inform the offender that no answer need be given to the allegation before the offender—

(i)has been given an opportunity to take legal advice, or

(ii)has indicated that the offender does not wish to take legal advice.

(11)The court must then—

(a)if it is the appropriate court, appoint another hearing for consideration of the alleged failure in accordance with section 227ZC, or

(b)if it is not the appropriate court, refer the alleged failure to that court for consideration in accordance with that section.

(12)On conclusion of a progress review in respect of a community payback order, the court may vary, revoke or discharge the order in accordance with section 227Z.

227YApplications to vary, revoke and discharge community payback orders

(1)The appropriate court may, on the application of either of the persons mentioned in subsection (2), vary, revoke or discharge a community payback order in accordance with section 227Z.

(2)Those persons are—

(a)the offender on whom the order was imposed,

(b)the responsible officer in relation to the offender.

227ZVariation, revocation and discharge: court's powers

(1)This section applies where a court is considering varying, revoking or discharging a community payback order imposed on an offender.

(2)The court may vary, revoke or discharge the order only if satisfied that it is in the interests of justice to do so having regard to circumstances which have arisen since the order was imposed.

(3)Subsection (2) does not apply where the court is considering varying the order under section 227ZC(7)(d).

(4)In varying an order, the court may, in particular—

(a)add to the requirements imposed by the order,

(b)revoke or discharge any requirement imposed by the order,

(c)vary any requirement imposed by the order,

(d)include provision for progress reviews under section 227X,

(e)where the order already includes such provision, vary that provision.

(5)In varying a requirement imposed by the order, the court may, in particular—

(a)extend or shorten any period or other time limit specified in the requirement,

(b)in the case of an unpaid work or other activity requirement, increase or decrease the number of hours specified in the requirement,

(c)in the case of a compensation requirement, vary the amount of compensation or any instalment.

(6)The court may not, under subsection (5)(b), increase the number of hours beyond the appropriate maximum.

(7)The appropriate maximum is the number of hours specified in section 227I(4)(b) at the time the unpaid work or other activity requirement being varied was imposed less the aggregate of the number of hours of unpaid work or other activity still to be completed under each other unpaid work or other activity requirement (if any) in effect in respect of the offender at the time of the variation (a “current requirement”).

(8)In calculating that aggregate, if any current requirement is concurrent with another (by virtue of a direction under section 227N(2)), hours that count for the purposes of compliance with both (or, as the case may be, all) are to be counted only once.

(9)The court may not, under subsection (5)(c), increase the amount of compensation beyond the maximum that could have been awarded at the time the requirement was imposed.

(10)Where the court varies a restricted movement requirement imposed by a community payback order, the court must give a copy of the order making the variation to the person responsible for monitoring the offender's compliance with the requirement.

(11)Where the court revokes a community payback order, the court may deal with the offender in respect of the offence in relation to which the order was imposed as it could have dealt with the offender had the order not been imposed.

(12)Subsection (11) applies in relation to a community payback order imposed under section 227M(2) as if the reference to the offence in relation to which the order was imposed were a reference to the failure to pay in respect of which the order was imposed.

(13)Where the court is considering varying, revoking or discharging the order otherwise than on the application of the offender, the court must issue a citation to the offender requiring the offender to appear before the court (except where the offender is required to appear by section 227X(6)) or 227ZC(2)(b).

(14)If the offender fails to appear as required by the citation, the court may issue a warrant for the arrest of the offender.

(15)The unified citation provisions apply in relation to a citation under subsection (13) as they apply in relation to a citation under section 216(3)(a) of this Act.

227ZAVariation of community payback orders: further provision

(1)This section applies where a court is considering varying a community payback order imposed on an offender.

(2)The court must not make the variation unless it has obtained, and taken account of, a report from the responsible officer containing information about the offender and the offender's circumstances.

(3)An Act of Adjournal may prescribe—

(a)the form of a report under subsection (2), and

(b)the particular information to be contained in it.

(4)Subsection (2) does not apply where the court is considering varying a community payback order—

(a)so that it imposes only a level 1 unpaid work or other activity requirement, or

(b)imposed under section 227M(2).

(5)The clerk of the court must give a copy of any report obtained under subsection (2) to—

(a)the offender,

(b)the offender's solicitor (if any).

(6)Before making the variation, the court must explain to the offender in ordinary language—

(a)the purpose and effect of each of the requirements to be imposed by the order as proposed to be varied,

(b)the consequences which may follow if the offender fails to comply with any of the requirements imposed by the order as proposed to be varied, and

(c)where the court proposes to include in the order as proposed to be varied provision for a progress review under section 227X, or to vary any such provision already included in the order, the arrangements for such a review.

(7)The court must not make the variation unless the offender has, after the court has explained those matters, confirmed that the offender—

(a)understands those matters, and

(b)is willing to comply with each of the requirements to be imposed by the order as proposed to be amended.

(8)Where the variation would impose a new requirement—

(a)the court must not make the variation if the new requirement is not a requirement that could have been imposed by the order when it was imposed,

(b)if the new requirement is one which could have been so imposed, the court must, before making the variation take whatever steps the court would have been required to take before imposing the requirement had it been imposed by the order when it was imposed.

(9)Subsection (8)(a) does not prevent the imposition of a restricted movement requirement under section 227ZC(7)(d).

(10)In determining for the purpose of subsection (8)(a) whether an unpaid work or other activity requirement is a requirement that could have been imposed by the order when the order was imposed, the effect of section 227N(7) is to be ignored.

(11)Where the variation would vary any requirement imposed by the order, the court must not make the variation if the requirement as proposed to be varied could not have been imposed, or imposed in that way, by the order when it was imposed.

(12)Subsections (4) and (5) of section 227D apply, with the necessary modifications, where a community payback order is varied as they apply where such an order is imposed.

227ZBChange of offender's residence to new local authority area

(1)The section applies where—

(a)the offender on whom a community payback order has been imposed proposes to change, or has changed, residence to a locality (“the new locality”) situated in the area of a different local authority from that in which the locality currently specified in the order is situated, and

(b)the court is considering varying the order so as to specify the new local authority area in which the offender resides or will reside.

(2)The court may vary the order only if satisfied that arrangements have been, or can be, made in the local authority area in which the new locality is situated for the offender to comply with the requirements imposed by the order.

(3)If the court considers that a requirement (“the requirement concerned”) imposed by the order cannot be complied with if the offender resides in the new locality, the court must not vary the order so as to specify the new local authority area unless it also varies the order so as to—

(a)revoke or discharge the requirement concerned, or

(b)substitute for the requirement concerned another requirement that can be so complied with.

(4)Where the court varies the order, the court must also vary the order so as to require the local authority for the area in which the new locality is situated to nominate an officer of the authority to be the responsible officer for the purposes of the order.

Breach of community payback orderS
227ZCBreach of community payback order

(1)This section applies where it appears to the appropriate court that an offender on whom a community payback order has been imposed has failed to comply with a requirement imposed by the order.

(2)The court may—

(a)issue a warrant for the offender's arrest, or

(b)issue a citation to the offender requiring the offender to appear before the court.

(3)If the offender fails to appear as required by a citation issued under subsection (2)(b), the court may issue a warrant for the arrest of the offender.

(4)The unified citation provisions apply in relation to a citation under subsection (2)(b) as they apply in relation to a citation under section 216(3)(a) of this Act.

(5)The court must, before considering the alleged failure—

(a)provide the offender with written details of the alleged failure,

(b)inform the offender that the offender is entitled to be legally represented, and

(c)inform the offender that no answer need be given to the allegation before the offender—

(i)has been given an opportunity to take legal advice, or

(ii)has indicated that the offender does not wish to take legal advice.

(6)Subsection (5) does not apply if the offender has previously been provided with those details and informed about those matters under section 227X(10) of this Act.

(7)Where the order was imposed under section 227A, if the court is satisfied that the offender has failed without reasonable excuse to comply with a requirement imposed by the order, the court may—

(a)impose on the offender a fine not exceeding level 3 on the standard scale,

(b)where the order was imposed under section 227A(1), revoke the order and deal with the offender in respect of the offence in relation to which the order was imposed as it could have dealt with the offender had the order not been imposed,

(c)where the order was imposed under section 227A(4), revoke the order and impose on the offender a sentence of imprisonment for a term not exceeding—

(i)where the court is a justice of the peace court, 60 days,

(ii)in any other case, 3 months,

(d)vary the order so as to impose a new requirement, vary any requirement imposed by the order or revoke or discharge any requirement imposed by the order, or

(e)both impose a fine under paragraph (a) and vary the order under paragraph (d).

(8)Where the order was imposed under section 227M(2), if the court is satisfied that the offender has failed without reasonable excuse to comply with a requirement imposed by the order, the court may—

(a)revoke the order and impose on the offender a period of imprisonment for a term not exceeding—

(i)where the court is a justice of the peace court, 60 days,

(ii)in any other case, 3 months, or

(b)vary—

(i)the number of hours specified in the level 1 unpaid work or other activity requirement imposed by the order, and

(ii)where the order also imposes an offender supervision requirement, the specified period under section 227G in relation to the requirement.

(9)Where the court revokes a community payback order under subsection (7)(b) or (c) and the offender is, in respect of the same offence, also subject to—

(a)a drug treatment and testing order, by virtue of section 234J, or

(b)a restriction of liberty order, by virtue of section 245D(3),

the court must, before dealing with the offender under subsection (7)(b) or (c), revoke the drug treatment and testing order or, as the case may be, restriction of liberty order.

(10)If the court is satisfied that the offender has failed to comply with a requirement imposed by the order but had a reasonable excuse for the failure, the court may, subject to section 227Z(2), vary the order so as to impose a new requirement, vary any requirement imposed by the order or revoke or discharge any requirement imposed by the order.

(11)Subsections (7)(b) and (c) and (9) are subject to section 42(9) of the Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act 2003 (asp 7) (powers of drugs courts to deal with breach of community payback orders).

227ZDBreach of community payback order: further provision

(1)Evidence of one witness is sufficient for the purpose of establishing that an offender has failed without reasonable excuse to comply with a requirement imposed by a community payback order.

(2)Subsection (3) applies in relation to a community payback order imposing a compensation requirement.

(3)A document bearing to be a certificate signed by the clerk of the appropriate court and stating that the compensation, or an instalment of the compensation, has not been paid as required by the requirement is sufficient evidence that the offender has failed to comply with the requirement.

(4)The appropriate court may, for the purpose of considering whether an offender has failed to comply with a requirement imposed by a community payback order, require the responsible officer to provide a report on the offender's compliance with the requirement.

Restricted movement requirementS
227ZERestricted movement requirement

(1)The requirements which the court may impose under section 227ZC(7)(d) include a restricted movement requirement.

(2)If the court varies a community payback order under section 227ZC(7)(d) so as to impose a restricted movement requirement, the court must also vary the order so as to impose an offender supervision requirement, unless an offender supervision requirement is already imposed by the order.

(3)The court must ensure that the specified period under section 227G in relation to the offender supervision requirement is at least as long as the period for which the restricted movement requirement has effect and, where the community payback order already imposes an offender supervision requirement, must vary it accordingly, if necessary.

(4)The minimum period of 6 months in section 227G(3) does not apply in relation to an offender supervision requirement imposed under subsection (2).

(5)Where the court varies the order so as to impose a restricted movement requirement, the court must give a copy of the order making the variation to the person responsible for monitoring the offender's compliance with the requirement.

(6)If during the period for which the restricted movement requirement is in effect it appears to the person responsible for monitoring the offender's compliance with the requirement that the offender has failed to comply with the requirement, the person must report the matter to the offender's responsible officer.

(7)On receiving a report under subsection (6), the responsible officer must report the matter to the court.

227ZFRestricted movement requirement: effect

(1)In this Act, a “restricted movement requirement” is, in relation to an offender, a requirement restricting the offender's movements to such extent as is specified.

(2)A restricted movement requirement may in particular require the offender—

(a)to be in a specified place at a specified time or during specified periods, or

(b)not to be in a specified place, or a specified class of place, at a specified time or during specified periods.

(3)In imposing a restricted movement requirement containing provision under subsection (2)(a), the court must ensure that the offender is not required, either by the requirement alone or the requirement taken together with any other relevant requirement or order, to be at any place for periods totalling more than 12 hours in any one day.

(4)In subsection (3), “other relevant requirement or order” means—

(a)any other restricted movement requirement in effect in respect of the offender at the time the court is imposing the requirement referred to in subsection (3), and

(b)any restriction of liberty order under section 245A in effect in respect of the offender at that time.

(5)A restricted movement requirement—

(a)takes effect from the specified day, and

(b)has effect for such period as is specified.

(6)The period specified under subsection (5)(b) must be—

(a)not less than 14 days, and

(b)subject to subsections (7) and (8), not more than 12 months.

(7)Subsection (8) applies in the case of a restricted movement requirement imposed for failure to comply with a requirement of a community payback order—

(a)where the offender was under 18 years of age at the time the order was imposed, or

(b)where the only requirement imposed by the order is a level 1 unpaid work or other activity requirement.

(8)The period specified under subsection (5)(b) must be not more than—

(a)where the order was imposed by a justice of the peace court, 60 days, or

(b)in any other case, 3 months.

(9)A court imposing a restricted movement requirement must specify in it—

(a)the method by which the offender's compliance with the requirement is to be monitored, and

(b)the person who is to be responsible for monitoring that compliance.

(10)The Scottish Ministers may by regulations made by statutory instrument substitute—

(a)for the number of hours for the time being specified in subsection (3) another number of hours,

(b)for the number of months for the time being specified in subsection (6)(b) another number of months.

(11)Regulations are not to be made under subsection (10) unless a draft of the statutory instrument containing the regulations has been laid before and approved by resolution of the Scottish Parliament.

(12)In this section, “specified”, in relation to a restricted movement requirement, means specified in the requirement.

227ZGRestricted movement requirements: further provision

(1)A court may not impose a restricted movement requirement requiring the offender to be, or not to be, in a specified place unless it is satisfied that the offender's compliance with the requirement can be monitored by the method specified in the requirement.

(2)Before imposing a restricted movement requirement requiring the offender to be in a specified place, the appropriate court must obtain and consider a report by an officer of the local authority in whose area the place is situated on—

(a)the place, and

(b)the attitude of any person (other than the offender) likely to be affected by the enforced presence of the offender at the place.

(3)The court may, before imposing the requirement, hear the officer who prepared the report.

227ZHVariation of restricted movement requirement

(1)This section applies where—

(a)a community payback order which is in force in respect of an offender imposes a restricted movement requirement requiring the offender to be at a particular place specified in the requirement for any period, and

(b)the court is considering varying the requirement so as to require the offender to be at a different place (“the new place”).

(2)Before making the variation, the appropriate court must obtain and consider a report by an officer of the local authority in whose area the new place is situated on—

(a)the new place, and

(b)the attitude of any person (other than the offender) likely to be affected by the enforced presence of the offender at the new place.

(3)The court may, before making the variation, hear the officer who prepared the report.

227ZIRemote monitoring

Section 245C of this Act, and regulations made under that section, apply in relation to the imposition of, and compliance with, restricted movement requirements as they apply in relation to the imposition of, and compliance with, restriction of liberty orders.

227ZJRestricted movement requirements: Scottish Ministers' functions

(1)The Scottish Ministers may by regulations made by statutory instrument prescribe—

(a)which courts, or class or classes of courts, may impose restricted movement requirements,

(b)the method or methods of monitoring compliance with a restricted movement requirement which may be specified in such a requirement,

(c)the class or classes of offender on whom such a requirement may be imposed.

(2)Regulations under subsection (1) may make different provision about the matters mentioned in paragraphs (b) and (c) of that subsection in relation to different courts or classes of court.

(3)Regulations under subsection (1) are subject to annulment in pursuance of a resolution of the Scottish Parliament.

(4)The Scottish Ministers must determine the person, or class or description of person, who may be specified in a restricted movement requirement as the person to be responsible for monitoring the offender's compliance with the requirement (referred to in this section as the “monitor”).

(5)The Scottish Ministers may determine different persons, or different classes or descriptions of person, in relation to different methods of monitoring.

(6)The Scottish Ministers must notify each court having power to impose a restricted movement requirement of their determination.

(7)Subsection (8) applies where—

(a)the Scottish Ministers make a determination under subsection (4) changing a previous determination made by them, and

(b)a person specified in a restricted movement requirement in effect at the date the determination takes effect as the monitor is not a person, or is not of a class or description of person, mentioned in the determination as changed.

(8)The appropriate court must—

(a)vary the restricted movement requirement so as to specify a different person as the monitor,

(b)send a copy of the requirement as varied to that person and to the responsible officer, and

(c)notify the offender of the variation.

227ZKDocumentary evidence in proceedings for breach of restricted movement requirement

(1)This section applies for the purposes of establishing in any proceedings whether an offender on whom a restricted movement requirement has been imposed has complied with the requirement.

(2)Evidence of the presence or absence of the offender at a particular place at a particular time may be given by the production of a document or documents bearing to be—

(a)a statement automatically produced by a device specified in regulations made under section 245C of this Act, by which the offender's whereabouts were remotely monitored, and

(b)a certificate signed by a person nominated for the purposes of this paragraph by the Scottish Ministers that the statement relates to the whereabouts of the offender at the dates and times shown in the statement.

(3)The statement and certificate are, when produced in evidence, sufficient evidence of the facts stated in them.

(4)The statement and certificate are not admissible in evidence at any hearing unless a copy of them has been served on the offender before the hearing.

(5)Where it appears to any court before which the hearing is taking place that the offender has not had sufficient notice of the statement or certificate, the court may adjourn the hearing or make any order that it considers appropriate.

Local authorities: annual consultation about unpaid workS
227ZLLocal authorities: annual consultations about unpaid work

(1)Each local authority must, for each year, consult prescribed persons about the nature of unpaid work and other activities to be undertaken by offenders residing in the local authority's area on whom community payback orders are imposed.

(2)In subsection (1), “prescribed persons” means such persons, or class or classes of person, as may be prescribed by the Scottish Ministers by regulations made by statutory instrument.

(3)A statutory instrument containing regulations under subsection (2) is to be subject to annulment in pursuance of a resolution of the Scottish Parliament.

Annual reports on community payback ordersS
227ZMAnnual reports on community payback orders

(1)Each local authority must, as soon as practicable after the end of each reporting year, prepare a report on the operation of community payback orders within their area during that reporting year, and send a copy of the report to the Scottish Ministers.

(2)The Scottish Ministers may issue directions to local authorities about the content of their reports under subsection (1); and local authorities must comply with any such directions.

(3)The Scottish Ministers must, as soon as practicable after the end of each reporting year, lay before the Scottish Parliament and publish a report that collates and summarises the data included in the various reports under subsection (1).

(4)In this section, “reporting year” means—

(a)the period of 12 months beginning on the day this section comes into force, or

(b)any subsequent period of 12 months beginning on an anniversary of that day.

Community payback order: meaning of “the appropriate court”S
227ZNMeaning of “the appropriate court”

(1)In sections 227A to 227ZK, “the appropriate court” means, in relation to a community payback order—

(a)where the order was imposed by the High Court of Justiciary, that Court,

(b)where the order was imposed by a sheriff, a sheriff having jurisdiction in the locality mentioned in subsection (2),

(c)where the order was imposed by a justice of the peace court—

(i)the justice of the peace court having jurisdiction in that locality, or

(ii)if there is no justice of the peace court having jurisdiction in that locality, a sheriff having such jurisdiction.

(2)The locality referred to in subsection (1) is the locality for the time being specified in the community payback order under section 227C(2)(a)..

(2)Schedule 2 modifies enactments in consequence of this section.

Non-harassment ordersS

15Non-harassment ordersS

In section 234A of the 1995 Act (non-harassment orders)—

(a)in subsection (1), for “harassment of” substitute “ misconduct towards ”,

(b)in subsection (2), for “further harassment” substitute “ harassment (or further harassment) ”,

(c)after subsection (2) insert—

(2A)The court may, for the purpose of subsection (2) above, have regard to any information given to it for that purpose by the prosecutor—

(a)about any other offence involving misconduct towards the victim—

(i)of which the offender has been convicted, or

(ii)as regards which the offender has accepted (or has been deemed to have accepted) a fixed penalty or compensation offer under section 302(1) or 302A(1) or as regards which a work order has been made under section 303ZA(6),

(b)in particular, by way of—

(i)an extract of the conviction along with a copy of the complaint or indictment containing the charge to which the conviction relates, or

(ii)a note of the terms of the charge to which the fixed penalty offer, compensation offer or work order relates.

(2B)But the court may do so only if the court may, under section 101 or 101A (in a solemn case) or section 166 or 166A (in a summary case), have regard to the conviction or the offer or order.

(2C)The court must give the offender an opportunity to make representations in response to the application., and

(d)for subsection (7) substitute—

(7)For the purposes of this section—

  • “harassment” and “conduct” are to be construed in accordance with section 8 of the Protection from Harassment Act 1997 (c.40),

  • misconduct” includes conduct that causes alarm or distress..

Short sentencesS

16Short periods of detentionS

(1)The 1995 Act is amended as follows.

(2)Section 169 (detention in precincts of court) is repealed.

(3)In section 206 (minimum periods of detention)—

(a)in subsection (1), for “five” substitute “ 15 ”, and

(b)subsections (2) to (6) are repealed.

17Presumption against short periods of imprisonmentS

In section 204 of the 1995 Act (restrictions on passing sentence of imprisonment or detention), after subsection (3) insert—

(3A)A court must not pass a sentence of imprisonment for a term of 3 months or less on a person unless the court considers that no other method of dealing with the person is appropriate.

(3B)Where a court passes such a sentence, the court must—

(a)state its reasons for the opinion that no other method of dealing with the person is appropriate, and

(b)have those reasons entered in the record of the proceedings.

(3C)The Scottish Ministers may by order made by statutory instrument substitute for the number of months for the time being specified in subsection (3A) another number of months.

(3D)An order under subsection (3C) is not to be made unless a draft of the statutory instrument containing the order has been laid before and approved by resolution of the Scottish Parliament..

18Amendments of Custodial Sentences and Weapons (Scotland) Act 2007S

(1)The Custodial Sentences and Weapons (Scotland) Act 2007 (asp 17) is amended as follows.

(2)In section 4 (basic definitions)—

(a)in subsection (1)—

(i)the definitions of “custody-only prisoner” and “custody-only sentence” are repealed,

(ii)in the definition of “custody and community sentence” for “15 days or more” substitute “ at least the prescribed period ”,

(iii)after the definition of “Parole Board” insert—

prescribed period” means such period as the Scottish Ministers may by order specify,, and

(iv)after the definition of “punishment part” insert—

short-term custody and community prisoner” means a person serving a short-term custody and community sentence,

short-term custody and community sentence” means a sentence of imprisonment for an offence for a term of less than the prescribed period,, and

(b)subsection (2) is repealed.

(3)For section 5 (release of custody-only prisoners on completion of sentence) substitute—

Short-term custody and community prisonersS
5Release of short-term custody and community prisoners

As soon as a short-term custody and community prisoner has served one-half of the prisoner's short-term custody and community sentence the Scottish Ministers must release the prisoner on short-term community licence..

(4)In Chapter 3 of Part 2, in the chapter title, for “Community” substitute “ Short-term community, community ”.

(5)In section 29 (release on licence of certain prisoners: the supervision conditions), in subsection (2)(a)—

(a)in sub-paragraph (ii), the words from “serving” to the end are repealed,

(b)sub-paragraph (iii) is repealed,

(c)in sub-paragraphs (iv) and (v), for “person” substitute “ short-term custody and community prisoner ”,

(d)in sub-paragraph (vi), for “person” substitute “ short-term custody and community prisoner serving a sentence of imprisonment of 6 months or more and ”, and

(e)in sub-paragraph (vii), at the beginning insert “ a short-term custody and community prisoner who is ”.

(6)After section 29 insert—

Short-term community licencesS
29ARelease on short-term community licence: conditions

(1)This section applies where, by virtue of section 5, the Scottish Ministers release a prisoner on short-term community licence.

(2)The Scottish Ministers must include in the prisoner's short-term community licence—

(a)the standard conditions, and

(b)where the prisoner falls within section 29(2), the supervision conditions.

(3)The Scottish Ministers may include in the prisoner's short-term community licence—

(a)where the prisoner does not fall within section 29(2), any of the supervision conditions,

(b)such other conditions as they consider appropriate.

(4)The Scottish Ministers may—

(a)vary any condition mentioned in subsection (2) or (3),

(b)cancel any condition mentioned in subsection (3),

(c)include any further conditions in the licence.

(5)The Scottish Ministers may not cancel any condition mentioned in subsection (2).

(6)Before exercising any of the powers conferred by subsection (3) or (4), the Scottish Ministers must, in pursuance of arrangements established under section 46A(1), co-operate with the appropriate local authority.

(7)In this section, “appropriate local authority”, in relation to a short-term custody and community prisoner, means the local authority for the area in which the prisoner—

(a)resided immediately before the imposition of the short-term custody and community sentence, or

(b)intends to reside on release on short-term community licence.

(8)If, by virtue of subsection (7), two or more local authorities are the appropriate local authority in relation to a short-term custody and community prisoner, those authorities may agree that the functions conferred on them by subsection (5) and section 46A(2) may be carried out by only one of them..

(7)After section 46 insert—

Assessment of conditions for short-term community licencesS
46AJoint arrangements between Scottish Ministers and local authorities

(1)The Scottish Ministers and each local authority must jointly establish arrangements for the assessment and management of the risk posed in the local authority's area by short-term custody and community prisoners released on licence subject to the supervision conditions.

(2)For the purposes of assisting the Scottish Ministers in deciding whether, under section 29A(3)(a), to include any of the supervision conditions in a prisoner's short-term community licence, the Scottish Ministers and the appropriate local authority must, during the first half of a short-term custody and community prisoner's sentence, assess, in accordance with arrangements established under subsection (1), whether any of those conditions are appropriate.

(3)In this section, “appropriate local authority” is to be construed in accordance with section 29A(7) and (8)..

(8)In section 47 (curfew licences)—

(a)in subsection (1), after “to” insert “ a short-term custody and community prisoner or ”,

(b)in subsection (2) for “the custody part of the prisoner's sentence” substitute—

(a)in the case of a short-term custody and community prisoner, the first half of the prisoner's sentence,

(b)in the case of a custody and community prisoner, the custody part of the prisoner's sentence,

(c)after subsection (3) insert—

(3A)The Scottish Ministers may release a short-term custody and community prisoner on curfew licence only—

(a)after the later of—

(i)the day on which the prisoner has served the greater of one-quarter or four weeks of the prisoner's sentence, or

(ii)the day falling 166 days before the expiry of one-half of the prisoner's sentence, and

(b)before the day falling 14 days before the expiry of one-half of the prisoner's sentence.,

(d)in subsection (4)—

(i)after “a” insert “ custody and community ”, and

(ii)in paragraph (a)(ii), for “135” substitute “ 166 ”, and

(e)in subsection (8), for “the custody part of the prisoner's sentence” substitute—

(a)in the case of a short-term custody and community prisoner, the first half of the prisoner's sentence,

(b)in the case of a custody and community prisoner, the custody part of the prisoner's sentence.

(9)Schedule 3 amends the Custodial Sentences and Weapons (Scotland) Act (asp 17) and the 1995 Act in consequence of amendments made by this section.

19Early removal of certain short-term prisoners from the United KingdomS

For schedule 6 to the Custodial Sentences and Weapons (Scotland) Act 2007 (asp 17) (transitory amendments of the Prisoners and Criminal Proceedings (Scotland) Act 1993) substitute—

SCHEDULE 6STRANSITORY AMENDMENTS

(introduced by section 66(3))

1Until the coming into force of the repeal by this Act of Part 1 of the Prisoners and Criminal Proceedings (Scotland) Act 1993 (c.9), that Part has effect in accordance with paragraphs 2 to 4.

2In section 1 (release of short-term and long-term prisoners), subsection (3) has effect as if for paragraphs (a) and (b) there were substituted “ must, ”

3Section 9 (persons liable to removal from the United Kingdom) has effect as if—

(a)subsection (1) were repealed, and

(b)in subsection (3), after “section”, where it first occurs, there were inserted “ and sections 9A and 9B ”.

4That Part has effect as if after section 9 there were inserted—

9APersons eligible for removal from the United Kingdom

(1)For the purposes of this Part, to be “eligible for removal from the United Kingdom” a person must show, to the satisfaction of the Scottish Ministers, that the condition in subsection (2) is met.

(2)The condition is that the person has the settled intention of residing permanently outside the United Kingdom if removed from prison under section 9B.

(3)The person must not be one who is liable to removal from the United Kingdom.

9BEarly removal of certain short-term prisoners from the United Kingdom

(1)Subject to subsection (2), where a short-term prisoner is liable to, or eligible for, removal from the United Kingdom, the Scottish Ministers may remove the prisoner from prison under this section at any time during the period of 180 days ending with the day on which the prisoner will have served one-half of the prisoner's sentence.

(2)Subsection (1) does not apply in relation to a prisoner unless the prisoner has served one-quarter of the sentence.

(3)A prisoner removed from prison under this section—

(a)if liable to removal from the United Kingdom, is so removed only for the purpose of enabling the Secretary of State to remove the prisoner from the United Kingdom under powers conferred by—

(i)Schedule 2 or 3 to the Immigration Act 1971 (c.77), or

(ii)section 10 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 (c.33),

(b)if eligible for removal from the United Kingdom, is so removed only for the purpose of enabling the prisoner to leave the United Kingdom in order to reside permanently outside the United Kingdom, and

(c)in either case, so long as remaining in the United Kingdom, remains liable to be detained in pursuance of the prisoner's sentence until the prisoner has served one-half of the sentence.

(4)So long as a prisoner removed from prison under this section remains in the United Kingdom but has not been returned to prison, any duty or power of the Scottish Ministers under section 1(1), 1AA or 3 is exercisable in relation to the prisoner as if the prisoner were in prison.

(5)The Scottish Ministers may by order amend the number of days for the time being specified in subsection (1).

(6)A statutory instrument containing an order under subsection (5) may not be made unless a draft of the instrument has been laid before, and approved by resolution of, the Scottish Parliament.

9CRe-entry into United Kingdom of prisoner removed from prison early

(1)This section applies in relation to a person (referred to in this section as “the removed person”) who, after being removed from prison under section 9B, has been removed from the United Kingdom before serving one-half of the sentence.

(2)Where the removed person re-enters the United Kingdom at any time before the date on which the person would have served the person's sentence in full (but for the person's removal from prison under section 9B), the person is liable to be detained in pursuance of the person's sentence until the earlier of the following—

(a)the date of the expiry of the outstanding custodial period,

(b)the date on which the person would have served the person's sentence in full (but for the person's removal from prison under section 9B).

(3)In the case of a person liable to be detained under subsection (2), the duty to release the person under section 1(1) or 1AA(1) applies only after the expiry of the outstanding custodial period.

(4)A person who is liable to be detained by virtue of subsection (2) is, if at large, to be taken for the purposes of section 40 of the Prisons (Scotland) Act 1989 (c.45) (persons unlawfully at large) to be unlawfully at large.

(5)Subsection (2) does not prevent—

(a)the further removal from prison under section 9B(1) of a person falling within that subsection, or

(b)the further removal from the United Kingdom of such a person.

(6)In this section, the “outstanding custodial period” means, in relation to a removed person, a period of time equal to the period beginning with the date of removal from the United Kingdom and ending with the date on which the person would, but for the removal, have served one-half of the sentence..

5Until the coming into force of the repeal by this Act of Part 1 of the Prisoners and Criminal Proceedings (Scotland) Act 1993 (c.9), paragraph (c) of section 24 of the International Criminal Court (Scotland) Act 2001 (asp 13) (limited disapplication of certain provisions relating to sentences) has effect as if—

(a)after “9” there were inserted “ , 9A, 9B, 9C ”, and

(b)after “transfer” there were inserted “ , removal ”..

Other sentencing measuresS

20Reports about supervised personsS

(1)Section 203 of the 1995 Act (reports) is amended as follows.

(2)In subsection (3), for the words from “the offender” to the end substitute—

(a)the offender,

(b)the offender's solicitor (if any), and

(c)the prosecutor..

21Detention of children convicted on indictmentS

(1)Section 208 of the 1995 Act (detention of children convicted on indictment) is amended as follows.

(2)After subsection (1), insert—

(1A)Where the court imposes a sentence of detention on a child, the court must—

(a)state its reasons for the opinion that no other method of dealing with the child is appropriate, and

(b)have those reasons entered in the record of the proceedings..

(3)In subsection (2), for “Subsection (1) above is” substitute “ Subsections (1) and (1A) above are ”.

22Pre-sentencing reports about organisationsS

After section 203 of the 1995 Act (reports), insert—

203AReports about organisations

(1)This section applies where an organisation is convicted of an offence.

(2)Before dealing with the organisation in respect of the offence, the court may obtain a report into the organisation's financial affairs and structural arrangements.

(3)The report is to be prepared by a person appointed by the court.

(4)The person appointed to prepare the report is referred to in this section as the “reporter”.

(5)The court may issue directions to the reporter about—

(a)the information to be contained in the report,

(b)the particular matters to be covered by the report,

(c)the time by which the report is to be submitted to the court.

(6)The court may order the organisation to give the reporter and any person acting on the reporter's behalf—

(a)access at all reasonable times to the organisation's books, documents and other records,

(b)such information or explanation as the reporter thinks necessary.

(7)The reporter's costs in preparing the report are to be paid by the clerk of court, but the court may order the organisation to reimburse to the clerk all or a part of those costs.

(8)An order under subsection (7) may be enforced by civil diligence as if it were a fine.

(9)On submission of the report to the court, the clerk of court must provide a copy of the report to—

(a)the organisation,

(b)the organisation's solicitor (if any), and

(c)the prosecutor.

(10)The court must have regard to the report in deciding how to deal with the organisation in respect of the offence.

(11)If the court decides to impose a fine, the court must, in determining the amount of the fine, have regard to—

(a)the report, and

(b)if the court makes an order under subsection (7), the amount of costs that the organisation is required to reimburse under the order.

(12)Where the court—

(a)makes an order under subsection (7), and

(b)imposes a fine on the organisation,

any payment by the organisation is first to be applied in satisfaction of the order under subsection (7).

(13)Where the court also makes a compensation order in respect of the offence, any payment by the organisation is first to be applied in satisfaction of the compensation order before being applied in accordance with subsection (12)..

23Extended sentences for certain sexual offencesS

In section 210A of the 1995 Act (extended sentences for sex and violent offenders)—

(a)in subsection (10), at the end of the definition of “sexual offence” add—

(xxviii)an offence (other than one mentioned in the preceding paragraphs) where the court determines for the purposes of this paragraph that there was a significant sexual aspect to the offender's behaviour in committing the offence;, and

(b)after subsection (11) add—

(12)An extended sentence may be passed by reference to paragraph (xxviii) only if the offender is or is to become, by virtue of Schedule 3 to the Sexual Offences Act 2003 (c.42), subject to the notification requirements of Part 2 of that Act..

24Effect of probation and absolute dischargeS

(1)In section 1(4) of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (c.53) (construction of references in Act to “conviction”), for “section 9 of the Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act 1949” substitute “ section 247 of the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995 (c.46) ”.

(2)In section 49(6) of the 1982 Act (offences relating to dangerous and annoying creatures: power to order disposal of creature), the words “or makes a probation order in relation to him” are repealed.

(3)In section 58(3) of the 1982 Act (convicted thief in possession: power to order forfeiture of tools etc.)—

(a)the words “or makes a probation order in relation to him” are repealed, and

(b)for the words from “discharged absolutely” to the end substitute “ , as the case may be, discharged absolutely. ”.

(4)In section 96 of the 2005 Act (exclusion orders: supplementary provision), after subsection (2) insert—

(2A)For the purposes of section 94, section 247(1) of the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995 (c.46) (convictions deemed not be convictions where offender placed on probation or discharged absolutely) does not apply to a conviction for a violent offence within the meaning of section 94..

(5)In section 129 of the 2005 Act (relevant and foreign offences), after subsection (4) add—

(5)For the purposes of the provisions of this Act specified in subsection (6), section 247(1) and (2) of the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995 (c.46) (convictions deemed not to be convictions where offender placed on probation or discharged absolutely) does not apply to a conviction for a relevant offence.

(6)Those provisions are—

(a)section 21(4),

(b)section 23(6),

(c)section 24,

(d)section 33(6),

(e)sections 41 to 44,

(f)section 73(3),

(g)section 75,

(h)sections 80 to 83,

(i)section 89(4) and (5),

(j)subsection (3) of this section, and

(k)section 130..

25Offences aggravated by racial or religious prejudiceS

(1)In section 96 of the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 (c.37) (racially aggravated offences), for subsection (5) substitute—

(5)The court must—

(a)state on conviction that the offence was racially aggravated,

(b)record the conviction in a way that shows that the offence was so aggravated,

(c)take the aggravation into account in determining the appropriate sentence, and

(d)state—

(i)where the sentence in respect of the offence is different from that which the court would have imposed if the offence were not so aggravated, the extent of and the reasons for that difference, or

(ii)otherwise, the reasons for there being no such difference..

(2)In section 74 of the Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act 2003 (asp 7) (offences aggravated by religious prejudice)—

(a)after subsection (2) insert—

(2A)It is immaterial whether or not the offender's malice and ill-will is also based (to any extent) on any other factor.,

(b)subsections (3) and (4) are repealed, and

(c)after subsection (4) insert—

(4A)The court must—

(a)state on conviction that the offence was aggravated by religious prejudice,

(b)record the conviction in a way that shows that the offence was so aggravated,

(c)take the aggravation into account in determining the appropriate sentence, and

(d)state—

(i)where the sentence in respect of the offence is different from that which the court would have imposed if the offence were not so aggravated, the extent of and the reasons for that difference, or

(ii)otherwise, the reasons for there being no such difference..

26Voluntary intoxication by alcohol: effect in sentencingS

(1)Subsection (2) applies in relation to an offender who was, at the time of the offence, under the influence of alcohol as a result of having voluntarily consumed alcohol.

(2)A court, in sentencing the offender in respect of the offence, must not take that fact into account by way of mitigation.

27Mutual recognition of judgments and probation decisionsS

(1)The Scottish Ministers may by order make provision for the purposes of and in connection with implementing any obligations of the United Kingdom created by or arising under the Framework Decision (so far as they have effect in or as regards Scotland).

(2)The provision may, in particular, confer functions—

(a)on the Scottish Ministers,

(b)on other persons.

(3)An order under subsection (1) may modify any enactment.

(4)In this section, the “Framework Decision” means Council Framework Decision 2008/947/JHA of 27 November 2008 on the application of the principle of mutual recognition to judgments and probation decisions with a view to the supervision of probation measures and alternative sanctions.

PART 2 SCRIMINAL LAW

Serious organised crimeS

28Involvement in serious organised crimeS

(1)A person who agrees with at least one other person to become involved in serious organised crime commits an offence.

(2)Without limiting the generality of subsection (1), a person agrees to become involved in serious organised crime if the person—

(a)agrees to do something (whether or not the doing of that thing would itself constitute an offence), and

(b)knows or suspects, or ought reasonably to have known or suspected, that the doing of that thing will enable or further the commission of serious organised crime.

(3)For the purposes of this section and sections 29 to 31—

  • serious organised crime” means crime involving two or more persons acting together for the principal purpose of committing or conspiring to commit a serious offence or a series of serious offences,

  • serious offence” means an indictable offence—

    (a)

    committed with the intention of obtaining a material benefit for any person, or

    (b)

    which is an act of violence committed or a threat made with the intention of obtaining such a benefit in the future, and

  • material benefit” means a right or interest of any description in any property, whether heritable or moveable and whether corporeal or incorporeal.

(4)A person guilty of an offence under subsection (1) is liable—

(a)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 10 years or to a fine or to both,

(b)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum or to both.

29Offences aggravated by connection with serious organised crimeS

(1)This subsection applies where it is—

(a)libelled in an indictment or specified in a complaint that an offence is aggravated by a connection with serious organised crime, and

(b)proved that the offence is so aggravated.

(2)An offence is aggravated by a connection with serious organised crime if the person committing the offence is motivated (wholly or partly) by the objective of committing or conspiring to commit serious organised crime.

(3)It is immaterial whether or not in committing the offence the person in fact enables the person or another person to commit serious organised crime.

(4)Evidence from a single source is sufficient to prove that an offence is aggravated by a connection with serious organised crime.

(5)Where subsection (1) applies, the court must—

(a)state on conviction that the offence is aggravated by a connection with serious organised crime,

(b)record the conviction in a way that shows that the offence was so aggravated,

(c)take the aggravation into account in determining the appropriate sentence, and

(d)state—

(i)where the sentence in respect of the offence is different from that which the court would have imposed if the offence were not so aggravated, the extent of and the reasons for that difference, or

(ii)otherwise, the reasons for there being no such difference.

30Directing serious organised crimeS

(1)A person commits an offence by directing another person—

(a)to commit a serious offence,

(b)to commit an offence aggravated by a connection with serious organised crime under section 29.

(2)A person commits an offence by directing another person to direct a further person to commit an offence mentioned in subsection (1).

(3)For the purposes of subsections (1) and (2), a person directs another person to commit an offence if the person—

(a)does something, or a series of things, to direct the person to commit the offence,

(b)intends that the thing or things done will persuade the person to commit the offence, and

(c)intends that the thing or things done will—

(i)result in a person committing serious organised crime, or

(ii)enable a person to commit serious organised crime.

(4)The person directing the other person commits an offence under subsection (1) whether or not the other person in fact commits—

(a)a serious offence, or

(b)an offence aggravated by a connection with serious organised crime under section 29.

(5)In this section “directing” a person to commit an offence includes inciting the person to commit the offence.

(6)A person guilty of an offence under subsection (1) or (2) is liable—

(a)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 14 years or to a fine or to both,

(b)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum or to both.

31Failure to report serious organised crimeS

(1)This section applies where—

(a)a person (“the person”) knows or suspects that another person (“the other person”) has committed—

(i)an offence under section 28 or 30, or

(ii)an offence which is aggravated by a connection with serious organised crime under section 29, and

(b)that knowledge or suspicion originates from information obtained—

(i)in the course of the person's trade, profession, business or employment, or

(ii)as a result of a close personal relationship between the person and the other person.

(2)In the case of knowledge or suspicion originating from information obtained by the person as a result of a close personal relationship between the person and the other person, this section applies only where the person has obtained a material benefit as a result of the commission of serious organised crime by the other person.

(3)The person commits an offence if the person does not disclose to a constable—

(a)the person's knowledge or suspicion, and

(b)the information on which that knowledge or suspicion is based.

(4)It is a defence for a person charged with an offence under subsection (3) to prove that the person had a reasonable excuse for not making the disclosure.

(5)Subsection (3) does not require disclosure by a person who is a professional legal adviser (an “adviser”) of—

(a)information which the adviser obtains in privileged circumstances, or

(b)knowledge or a suspicion based on information obtained in privileged circumstances.

(6)For the purpose of subsection (5), information is obtained by an adviser in privileged circumstances if it comes to the adviser, otherwise than for the purposes of committing serious organised crime—

(a)from a client (or from a client's representative) in connection with the provision of legal advice by the adviser to that person,

(b)from a person seeking legal advice from the adviser (or from that person's representative), or

(c)from a person, for the purpose of actual or contemplated legal proceedings.

(7)The reference in subsection (3) to a constable includes a reference to a police member of the Scottish Crime and Drug Enforcement Agency.

(8)A person guilty of an offence under this section is liable—

(a)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years or to a fine or to both,

(b)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum or to both.

Genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimesS

32Genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes: UK residentsS

(1)The International Criminal Court (Scotland) Act 2001 (asp 13) is amended as follows.

(2)After section 8, insert—

8AMeaning of “United Kingdom national” and “United Kingdom resident”

(1)In this Part—

  • United Kingdom national” means—

    (a)

    a British citizen, a British Overseas Territories citizen, a British National (Overseas) or a British Overseas citizen,

    (b)

    a person who under the British Nationality Act 1981 (c.61) is a British subject, or

    (c)

    a British protected person within the meaning of that Act,

  • United Kingdom resident” means a person who is resident in the United Kingdom.

(2)To the extent that it would not otherwise be the case, the following individuals are to be treated for the purposes of this Part as being resident in the United Kingdom—

(a)an individual who has indefinite leave to remain in the United Kingdom,

(b)any other individual who has made an application for such leave (whether or not it has been determined) and who is in the United Kingdom,

(c)an individual who has leave to enter or remain in the United Kingdom for the purposes of work or study and who is in the United Kingdom,

(d)an individual who has made an asylum claim, or a human rights claim, which has been granted,

(e)any other individual who has made an asylum claim or a human rights claim (whether or not the claim has been determined) and who is in the United Kingdom,

(f)an individual named in an application for indefinite leave to remain, an asylum claim or a human rights claim as a dependant of the individual making the application or claim if—

(i)the application or claim has been granted, or

(ii)the named individual is in the United Kingdom (whether or not the application or claim has been determined),

(g)an individual who would be liable to removal or deportation from the United Kingdom but cannot be removed or deported because of section 6 of the Human Rights Act 1998 (c.42) or for practical reasons,

(h)an individual—

(i)against whom a decision to make a deportation order under section 5(1) of the Immigration Act 1971 (c.77) by virtue of section 3(5)(a) of that Act (deportation conducive to the public good) has been made,

(ii)who has appealed against the decision to make the order (whether or not the appeal has been determined), and

(iii)who is in the United Kingdom,

(i)an individual who is an illegal entrant within the meaning of section 33(1) of the Immigration Act 1971 or who is liable to removal under section 10 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 (c.33),

(j)an individual who is detained in lawful custody in the United Kingdom.

(3)When determining for the purposes of this Part whether any other individual is resident in the United Kingdom regard is to be had to all relevant considerations including—

(a)the periods during which the individual is, has been or intends to be in the United Kingdom,

(b)the purposes for which the individual is, has been or intends to be in the United Kingdom,

(c)whether the individual has family or other connections to the United Kingdom and the nature of those connections, and

(d)whether the individual has an interest in residential property located in the United Kingdom.

(4)In this section—

  • asylum claim” means—

    (a)

    a claim that it would be contrary to the United Kingdom's obligations under the Refugee Convention for the claimant to be removed from, or required to leave, the United Kingdom,

    (b)

    a claim that the claimant would face a real risk of serious harm if removed from the United Kingdom,

  • Convention rights” means the rights identified as Convention rights by section 1 of the Human Rights Act 1998,

  • detained in lawful custody” means—

    (a)

    detained in pursuance of a sentence of imprisonment or detention, a sentence of custody for life or a detention and training order,

    (b)

    remanded in or committed to custody by an order of a court,

    (c)

    detained pursuant to an order under section 2 of the Colonial Prisoners Removal Act 1884 (c.31) or a warrant under section 1 or 4A of the Repatriation of Prisoners Act 1984 (c.47),

    (d)

    detained under Part 3 of the Mental Health Act 1983 (c.20) or by virtue of an order under section 5 of the Criminal Procedure (Insanity) Act 1964 (c.84) or section 6 or 14 of the Criminal Appeal Act 1968 (c.19) (hospital orders etc.),

    (e)

    detained by virtue of an order under Part 6 of the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995 (c.46) (other than an order under section 60C) or a hospital direction under section 59A of that Act, and includes detention by virtue of the special restrictions set out in Part 10 of the Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003 (asp 13) to which a person is subject by virtue of an order under section 59 of the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995,

    (f)

    detained under Part 3 of the Mental Health (Northern Ireland) Order 1986 (SI 1986/595) or by virtue of an order under section 11 or 13(5A) of the Criminal Appeal (Northern Ireland) Act 1980 (c. 47),

  • human rights claim” means a claim that to remove the claimant from, or to require the claimant to leave, the United Kingdom would be unlawful under section 6 of the Human Rights Act 1998 (public authority not to act contrary to Convention) as being incompatible with the person's Convention rights,

  • the Refugee Convention” means the Convention relating to the Status of Refugees done at Geneva on 28 July 1951 and the Protocol to the Convention,

  • serious harm” has the meaning given by article 15 of Council Directive 2004/83/EC on minimum standards for the qualification and status of third country nationals or stateless persons as refugees or as persons who otherwise need international protection and the content of the protection granted.

(5)In this section, a reference to having leave to enter or remain in the United Kingdom is to be construed in accordance with the Immigration Act 1971.

(6)This section applies in relation to any offence under this Part (whether committed before or after the coming into force of this section)..

(3)In section 28(1) (interpretation), the definitions of “United Kingdom national” and “United Kingdom resident” are repealed.

33Genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes: retrospective applicationS

After section 9 of the International Criminal Court (Scotland) Act 2001 (asp 13) insert—

9ARetrospective application of certain offences

(1)Section 1 of this Act applies to acts committed on or after 1 January 1991.

(2)But that section does not apply to an act committed before 17 December 2001 which constitutes a crime against humanity or a war crime within article 8.2(b) or (e) unless, at the time the act was committed, it amounted in the circumstances to a criminal offence under international law.

(3)Section 2 of this Act applies to conduct engaged in on or after 1 January 1991.

(4)The references in subsections (1), (3) and (5) of that section to an offence include an act or conduct that would not constitute an offence but for this section.

(5)Any enactment or rule of law relating to an offence ancillary to a relevant offence applies—

(a)to conduct engaged in on or after 1 January 1991, and

(b)even if the act or conduct constituting the relevant offence would not constitute such an offence but for this section.

(6)But section 2 of this Act, and any enactment or rule of law relating to an offence ancillary to a relevant offence, do not apply to—

(a)conduct engaged in before 17 December 2001, or

(b)conduct engaged in on or after that date which was ancillary to an act or conduct that—

(i)was committed or engaged in before that date, and

(ii)would not constitute a relevant offence but for this section,

unless, at the time the conduct was engaged in, it amounted in the circumstances to a criminal offence under international law.

(7)Section 5 of this Act, so far as it has effect in relation to relevant offences, applies—

(a)to failures to exercise control of the kind mentioned in subsection (2) or (3) of that section which occurred on or after 1 January 1991, and

(b)even if the act or conduct constituting the relevant offence would not constitute an offence but for this section.

(8)But section 5 of this Act, so far as it has effect in relation to relevant offences, does not apply to a failure to exercise control of the kind mentioned in subsection (2) or (3) of that section which occurred before 17 December 2001 unless, at the time it occurred, it amounted in the circumstances to a criminal offence under international law.

(9)In this section, “relevant offence” means an offence under section 1 or 2 of this Act or an offence ancillary to such an offence.

9BProvision supplemental to section 9A: modification of penalties

(1)This section applies in relation to—

(a)an offence under section 1 of this Act on account of an act committed before 17 December 2001 constituting genocide, if at the time the act was committed it also amounted to an offence under section 1 of the Genocide Act 1969,

(b)an offence under section 1 of this Act on account of an act committed before 1 September 2001 constituting a war crime, if at the time the act was committed it also amounted to an offence under section 1 of the Geneva Conventions Act 1957 (c.52) (grave breaches of the Conventions),

(c)an offence ancillary to an offence within paragraph (a) or (b) above.

(2)Section 3(5) of this Act has effect in relation to such an offence as if for “30 years” there were substituted “ 14 years ”..

Articles banned in prisonS

34Articles banned in prisonS

(1)In section 41 of the Prisons (Scotland) Act 1989 (c.45) (unlawful introduction of tobacco etc. into prison)—

(a)for subsection (1) substitute—

(1)A person commits an offence if without reasonable excuse the person—

(a)brings or otherwise introduces into a prison a proscribed article (or attempts to do so),

(b)takes out of or otherwise removes from a prison a proscribed article (or attempts to do so).

(1A)A person who commits an offence under this section—

(a)where the proscribed article falls within paragraphs (b) to (f) of subsection (9A), is liable on summary conviction to imprisonment for a period not exceeding 30 days or to a fine not exceeding level 3 on the standard scale (or to both),

(b)where the proscribed article falls within paragraph (a) of subsection (9A) (whether or not also within paragraph (f) of that subsection), is liable to the penalties set out in section 41ZA(5).,

(b)in subsection (2), for “the foregoing subsection” substitute “ subsection (1)(a), ”,

(c)in subsection (2A)—

(i)for “article mentioned in paragraphs (a) to (e) of subsection (1) above” substitute “ proscribed article ”, and

(ii)for “article mentioned in those paragraphs” substitute “ proscribed article ”,

(d)in subsection (2B)(c), for the words from “mentioned” to “that subsection)” substitute “ that is a proscribed article falling within paragraph (d) to (f) of subsection (9A) (but not also within paragraph (b) or (c) of that subsection), or falling within paragraph (a) of that subsection ”,

(e)in subsection (3), for “subsection (1) above” substitute “ this section or section 41ZA ”,

(f)after subsection (9) insert—

(9A)In this section, a “proscribed article” is—

(a)any personal communication device,

(b)any drug,

(c)any firearm or ammunition,

(d)any offensive weapon,

(e)any article which has a blade or is sharply pointed,

(f)any article (or other article) which is a prohibited article within the meaning of rules made under section 39.

(9B)In this section, a “personal communication device” includes—

(a)a mobile telephone,

(b)any other portable electronic device that is capable of transmitting or receiving a communication of any kind,

(c)any—

(i)component part of a device mentioned in paragraph (a) or (b),

(ii)article that is designed or adapted for use with such a device., and

(g)in subsection (10), in the definition of “offensive weapon”, for “the Prevention of Crime Act 1953” substitute “ section 47 of the Criminal Law (Consolidation) (Scotland) Act 1995 (c.39) ”.

(2)After section 41 of that Act insert—

41ZAFurther provision for communication devices

(1)A person commits an offence if, knowing another person to be a prisoner, the person gives a personal communication device to the prisoner while the prisoner is inside a prison.

(2)A person commits an offence if, by means of a personal communication device, the person—

(a)transmits, from inside a prison, a communication of any kind, or

(b)intentionally receives, when inside a prison, a communication of any kind.

(3)A person commits an offence if, while inside a prison, the person is in possession of a personal communication device.

(4)A person who commits an offence under subsections (1) to (3) is liable to the penalties set out in subsection (5).

(5)The penalties are—

(a)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a period not exceeding 2 years or to a fine (or to both),

(b)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a period not exceeding 12 months or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum (or to both).

(6)In this section, “personal communication device” is to be construed in accordance with section 41(9B).

41ZBExceptions as to communication devices

(1)No offence—

(a)under section 41, where the proscribed article falls within paragraph (a) of subsection (9A) (whether or not also within paragraph (f) of that subsection), or

(b)under section 41ZA(1) to (3),

is committed by a person where subsection (2) applies.

(2)This subsection applies—

(a)if (and in so far as) the act which constitutes the offence is done by the person at or in relation to a designated area at the prison, or

(b)if (and in so far as) the person is acting in circumstances to which an authorisation under subsection (8) applies.

(3)No offence—

(a)under section 41, where the proscribed article falls within paragraph (a) of subsection (9A) (whether or not also within paragraph (f) of that subsection), or

(b)under section 41ZA(2) or (3),

is committed by a prison officer (or other prison official) where subsection (4) applies.

(4)This subsection applies—

(a)if the device is one supplied to the person specifically for use in the course of the person's official duties at the prison, or

(b)if (and in so far as) the person is acting in accordance with those duties.

(5)No offence under section 41ZA(3) is committed by a person other than a prisoner if in the circumstances there is a reasonable excuse for the possession.

(6)The defences mentioned in subsection (7) apply in any proceedings for an offence under—

(a)section 41(1), where the proscribed article falls within paragraph (a) of subsection (9A) (whether or not also within paragraph (f) of that subsection), or

(b)section 41ZA(1) to (3).

(7)In relation to such an offence, it is a defence for the accused person to show that—

(a)the person reasonably believed that the person was acting in circumstances to which an authorisation under subsection (8) applied (even though no such authorisation did apply), or

(b)in the circumstances there was an overriding public interest which justified the person's actions.

(8)An authorisation under this subsection is a written authorisation that is given—

(a)in favour of any person specified in the authorisation (or person of a specified description),

(b)for a specified purpose, and

(c)by—

(i)the governor or director of a prison in relation to activities at that prison, or

(ii)the Scottish Ministers in relation to activities at any specified prison.

(9)A designated area referred to in subsection (2)(a) is any part of the prison, used solely or principally for an administrative or similar purpose, that is specified as such by a written designation given under this paragraph by the governor or director of the prison.

(10)Prison officers (or other prison officials) who are Crown servants or agents do not benefit from Crown immunity in relation to an offence under—

(a)section 41, where the proscribed article falls within paragraph (a) of subsection (9A) of that section (whether or not also within paragraph (f) of that subsection), or

(b)section 41ZA..

Crossbows, knives etc.S

35Sale and hire of crossbows to persons under 18S

(1)The Crossbows Act 1987 (c.32) is amended as follows.

(2)In section 1 (sale and letting on hire), the words from “unless” to the end are repealed.

(3)After that section insert—

1ADefences

(1)It is a defence for a person charged with an offence under section 1 (referred to in this section as “the accused”) to show that—

(a)the accused believed the person to whom the crossbow or part was sold or let on hire (referred to in this section as “the purchaser or hirer”) to be aged 18 or over, and

(b)either—

(i)the accused had taken reasonable steps to establish the purchaser or hirer's age, or

(ii)no reasonable person could have suspected from the purchaser or hirer's appearance that the purchaser or hirer was under the age of 18.

(2)For the purposes of subsection (1)(b)(i), the accused is to be treated as having taken reasonable steps to establish the purchaser or hirer's age if and only if—

(a)the accused was shown any of the documents mentioned in subsection (3), and

(b)the document would have convinced a reasonable person.

(3)Those documents are any document bearing to be—

(a)a passport,

(b)a European Union photocard driving licence, or

(c)such other document, or a document of such other description, as the Scottish Ministers may by order made by statutory instrument prescribe.

(4)A statutory instrument containing an order under subsection (3)(c) is subject to annulment in pursuance of a resolution of the Scottish Parliament..

(4)After section 3 insert—

3ATest purchasing

(1)A person under the age of 18 who buys or hires, or attempts to buy or hire, a crossbow or a part of a crossbow does not commit an offence under section 2 or 3 if the person is authorised to do so by the chief constable for the purpose of determining whether an offence is being committed under section 1.

(2)A chief constable may authorise a person under the age of 18 to buy or hire, or attempt to buy or hire, a crossbow or a part of a crossbow only if satisfied that all reasonable steps have been or will be taken to—

(a)ensure the person's safety, and

(b)avoid any risk to the person's welfare..

36Sale and hire of knives and certain other articles to persons under 18S

(1)Section 141A of the Criminal Justice Act 1988 (c.33) (sale of knives and certain articles with blade or point to persons under eighteen) is amended as follows.

(2)In subsection (1), after “sells” insert “ or lets on hire ”.

(3)In subsection (3A), after “sell” insert “ or let on hire ”.

(4)For subsection (4) substitute—

(4)It is a defence for a person charged with an offence under subsection (1) (referred to in this section as “the accused”) to show that—

(a)the accused believed the person to whom the article was sold or let on hire (referred to in this section as “the purchaser or hirer”) to be of or above the relevant age, and

(b)either—

(i)the accused had taken reasonable steps to establish the purchaser or hirer's age, or

(ii)no reasonable person could have suspected from the purchaser or hirer's appearance that the purchaser or hirer was aged under the relevant age.

(4A)For the purposes of subsection (4)(b)(i), the accused is to be treated as having taken reasonable steps to establish the purchaser or hirer's age if and only if—

(a)the accused was shown any of the documents mentioned in subsection (4B), and

(b)the document would have convinced a reasonable person.

(4B)Those documents are any document bearing to be—

(a)a passport,

(b)a European Union photocard driving licence, or

(c)such other document, or a document of such other description, as the Scottish Ministers may by order prescribe.

(4C)In subsection (4), “the relevant age” is—

(a)in the case where the article is a knife or knife blade designed for domestic use, 16 years, and

(b)in any other case, 18 years..

Offensive weapons etc.S

37Offensive weapons etc.S

(1)The Criminal Law (Consolidation) (Scotland) Act 1995 (c.39) is amended as follows.

(2)In section 47 (prohibition of the carrying of offensive weapons)—

(a)in subsection (1), the words from “without” to “him,” are repealed,

(b)after subsection (1), insert—

(1A)It is a defence for a person charged with an offence under subsection (1) to show that the person had a reasonable excuse or lawful authority for having the weapon with the person in the public place., and

(c)for subsection (4), substitute—

(4)In this section—

  • offensive weapon” means any article—

    (a)

    made or adapted for use for causing injury to a person, or

    (b)

    intended, by the person having the article, for use for causing injury to a person by—

    (i)

    the person having it, or

    (ii)

    some other person,

  • public place” means any place other than—

    (a)

    domestic premises,

    (b)

    school premises (within the meaning of section 49A(6)),

    (c)

    a prison (within the meaning of section 49C(7)),

  • domestic premises” means premises occupied as a private dwelling (including any stair, passage, garden, yard, garage, outhouse or other appurtenance of such premises which is not used in common by the occupants of more than one such dwelling)..

(3)In section 49 (offence of having in public place article with blade or point)—

(a)in subsection (4), for the words “prove that he had good reason” substitute “ show that the person had a reasonable excuse ”,

(b)in subsection (5), for “prove” substitute “ show ”, and

(c)for subsection (7), substitute—

(7)In this section, “public place” has the same meaning as in section 47(4)..

(4)In section 49A (offence of having article with blade or point (or offensive weapon) on school premises)—

(a)in subsection (3), for the words “prove that he had good reason” substitute “ show that the person had a reasonable excuse ”, and

(b)in subsection (4), for “prove” substitute “ show ”.

(5)In section 49C(2) (offence of having offensive weapon etc. in prison), for the words “prove that he had good reason” substitute “ show that the person had a reasonable excuse ”.

(6)In section 50(4) (extension of constable's power to stop, search and arrest without warrant), for “3” substitute “ 4 ”.

Threatening or abusive behaviourS

38Threatening or abusive behaviourS

(1)A person (“A”) commits an offence if—

(a)A behaves in a threatening or abusive manner,

(b)the behaviour would be likely to cause a reasonable person to suffer fear or alarm, and

(c)A intends by the behaviour to cause fear or alarm or is reckless as to whether the behaviour would cause fear or alarm.

(2)It is a defence for a person charged with an offence under subsection (1) to show that the behaviour was, in the particular circumstances, reasonable.

(3)Subsection (1) applies to—

(a)behaviour of any kind including, in particular, things said or otherwise communicated as well as things done, and

(b)behaviour consisting of—

(i)a single act, or

(ii)a course of conduct.

(4)A person guilty of an offence under subsection (1) is liable—

(a)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 5 years, or to a fine, or to both, or

(b)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months, or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum, or to both.

StalkingS

39Offence of stalkingS

(1)A person (“A”) commits an offence, to be known as the offence of stalking, where A stalks another person (“B”).

(2)For the purposes of subsection (1), A stalks B where—

(a)A engages in a course of conduct,

(b)subsection (3) or (4) applies, and

(c)A's course of conduct causes B to suffer fear or alarm.

(3)This subsection applies where A engages in the course of conduct with the intention of causing B to suffer fear or alarm.

(4)This subsection applies where A knows, or ought in all the circumstances to have known, that engaging in the course of conduct would be likely to cause B to suffer fear or alarm.

(5)It is a defence for a person charged with an offence under this section to show that the course of conduct—

(a)was authorised by virtue of any enactment or rule of law,

(b)was engaged in for the purpose of preventing or detecting crime, or

(c)was, in the particular circumstances, reasonable.

(6)In this section—

  • conduct” means—

    (a)

    following B or any other person,

    (b)

    contacting, or attempting to contact, B or any other person by any means,

    (c)

    publishing any statement or other material—

    (i)

    relating or purporting to relate to B or to any other person,

    (ii)

    purporting to originate from B or from any other person,

    (d)

    monitoring the use by B or by any other person of the internet, email or any other form of electronic communication,

    (e)

    entering any premises,

    (f)

    loitering in any place (whether public or private),

    (g)

    interfering with any property in the possession of B or of any other person,

    (h)

    giving anything to B or to any other person or leaving anything where it may be found by, given to or brought to the attention of B or any other person,

    (i)

    watching or spying on B or any other person,

    (j)

    acting in any other way that a reasonable person would expect would cause B to suffer fear or alarm, and

  • “course of conduct” involves conduct on at least two occasions.

(7)A person convicted of the offence of stalking is liable—

(a)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 5 years, or to a fine, or to both,

(b)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months, or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum, or to both.

(8)Subsection (9) applies where, in the trial of a person (“the accused”) charged with the offence of stalking, the jury or, in summary proceedings, the court—

(a)is not satisfied that the accused committed the offence, but

(b)is satisfied that the accused committed an offence under section 38(1).

(9)The jury or, as the case may be, the court may acquit the accused of the charge and, instead, find the accused guilty of an offence under section 38(1).

Sexual offencesS

40Certain sexual offences by non-natural personsS

(1)The Protection of Children and Prevention of Sexual Offences (Scotland) Act 2005 (asp 9) is amended as follows.

(2)At the end of each of the following provisions insert “ or a fine or both ”

(a)subsections (4)(b) and (5)(b) of section 9 (paying for sexual services of a child),

(b)subsection (2)(b) of section 10 (causing or inciting provision by child of sexual services or child pornography),

(c)subsection (2)(b) of section 11 (controlling a child providing sexual services or involved in pornography), and

(d)subsection (2)(b) of section 12 (arranging or facilitating provision by child of sexual services or child pornography).

(3)After section 14 insert—

14AOffences by bodies corporate etc.

(1)Subsection (2) applies where an offence under sections 10 to 12 committed—

(a)by a body corporate, is committed with the consent or connivance of, or is attributable to any neglect on the part of, a person who—

(i)is a director, manager, secretary or other similar officer of the body corporate, or

(ii)purports to act in any such capacity,

(b)by a Scottish partnership, is committed with the consent or connivance of, or is attributable to any neglect on the part of, a person who—

(i)is a partner, or

(ii)purports to act in that capacity,

(c)by an unincorporated association other than a Scottish partnership, is committed with the consent or connivance of, or is attributable to any neglect on the part of, a person who—

(i)is concerned in the management or control of the association, or

(ii)purports to act in the capacity of a person so concerned.

(2)The individual (as well as the body corporate, Scottish partnership or, as the case may be, unincorporated association) commits the offence and is liable to be proceeded against and punished accordingly.

(3)Where the affairs of a body corporate are managed by its members, this section applies in relation to acts and defaults of a member in connection with the member's function of management as if the member were a director of the body corporate..

41Indecent images of childrenS

(1)In the 1982 Act—

(a)in section 52 (indecent photographs etc. of children)—

(i)in subsection (2C)(b), for “a pseudo-photograph” substitute “ an indecent pseudo-photograph ”, and

(ii)after subsection (8) add—

(9)In this section, references to a photograph also include a tracing or other image, whether made by electronic or other means (of whatever nature), which is not itself a photograph or pseudo-photograph but which is derived from the whole or part of a photograph or pseudo-photograph (or a combination of either or both).

(10)And subsection (2B) applies in relation to such an image as it applies in relation to a pseudo-photograph., and

(b)in section 52A (possession of indecent photographs of children), in subsection (4), for “and (8)” substitute “ and (8) to (10) ”.

(2)In Schedule 1 to the 1995 Act (offences against children under the age of 17 years to which special provisions apply), in paragraph 2B, after “photograph” insert “ or pseudo-photograph ”.

(3)In Schedule 3 to the Sexual Offences Act 2003 (c.42) (list of sexual offences for the purposes of Part 2)—

(a)in paragraph 44, for the words from “the” where it third occurs to the end substitute—

(a)the prohibited goods included indecent photographs or pseudo-photographs of persons under 16 and the offender—

(i)was 18 or over, or

(ii)is or has been sentenced in respect of the offence to imprisonment for a term of at least 12 months, or

(b)in imposing sentence or otherwise disposing of the case, the court determines that it is appropriate that the offender be regarded, for the purposes of Part 2 of this Act, as a person who has committed an offence under this paragraph., and

(b)in paragraph 97(b), for “and (8)” substitute “ and (8) to (10) ”.

42Extreme pornographyS

(1)In section 51 of the 1982 Act (obscene material)—

(a)for subsection (3) substitute—

(3)A person guilty of an offence under this section is liable—

(a)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a period not exceeding 12 months or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum or to both, or

(b)on conviction on indictment—

(i)in a case where the obscene material is or includes an extreme pornographic image, to imprisonment for a period not exceeding 5 years or to a fine or to both, or

(ii)in any other case, to imprisonment for a period not exceeding 3 years or to a fine or to both., and

(b)in subsection (8)—

(i)before the definition of “material” insert—

extreme pornographic image” is to be construed in accordance with section 51A;, and

(ii)the definition of “prescribed sum” is repealed.

(2)After section 51 of that Act insert—

51AExtreme pornography

(1)A person who is in possession of an extreme pornographic image is guilty of an offence under this section.

(2)An extreme pornographic image is an image which is all of the following—

(a)obscene,

(b)pornographic,

(c)extreme.

(3)An image is pornographic if it is of such a nature that it must reasonably be assumed to have been made solely or principally for the purpose of sexual arousal.

(4)Where (as found in the person's possession) an image forms part of a series of images, the question of whether the image is pornographic is to be determined by reference to—

(a)the image itself, and

(b)where the series of images is such as to be capable of providing a context for the image, its context within the series of images,

and reference may also be had to any sounds accompanying the image or the series of images.

(5)So, for example, where—

(a)an image forms an integral part of a narrative constituted by a series of images, and

(b)having regard to those images as a whole, they are not of such a nature that they must reasonably be assumed to have been made solely or principally for the purpose of sexual arousal,

the image may, by virtue of being part of that narrative, be found not to be pornographic (even if it may have been found to be pornographic where taken by itself).

(6)An image is extreme if it depicts, in an explicit and realistic way any of the following—

(a)an act which takes or threatens a person's life,

(b)an act which results, or is likely to result, in a person's severe injury,

(c)rape or other non-consensual penetrative sexual activity,

(d)sexual activity involving (directly or indirectly) a human corpse,

(e)an act which involves sexual activity between a person and an animal (or the carcase of an animal).

(7)In determining whether (as found in the person's possession) an image depicts an act mentioned in subsection (6), reference may be had to—

(a)how the image is or was described (whether the description is part of the image itself or otherwise),

(b)any sounds accompanying the image,

(c)where the image forms an integral part of a narrative constituted by a series of images—

(i)any sounds accompanying the series of images,

(ii)the context provided by that narrative.

(8)A person guilty of an offence under this section is liable—

(a)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a period not exceeding 12 months or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum or to both,

(b)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a period not exceeding 3 years or to a fine or to both.

(9)In this section, an “image” is—

(a)a moving or still image (made by any means), or

(b)data (stored by any means) which is capable of conversion into such an image.

51BExtreme pornography: excluded images

(1)An offence is not committed under section 51A if the image is an excluded image.

(2)An “excluded image” is an image which is all or part of a classified work.

(3)An image is not an excluded image where—

(a)it has been extracted from a classified work, and

(b)it must be reasonably be assumed to have been extracted (whether with or without other images) from the work solely or principally for the purpose of sexual arousal.

(4)In determining whether (as found in the person's possession) the image was extracted from the work for the purpose mentioned in subsection (3)(b), reference may be had to—

(a)how the image was stored,

(b)how the image is or was described (whether the description is part of the image itself or otherwise),

(c)any sounds accompanying the image,

(d)where the image forms an integral part of a narrative constituted by a series of images—

(i)any sounds accompanying the series of images,

(ii)the context provided by that narrative.

(5)In this section—

  • classified work” means a video work in respect of which a classification certificate has been issued by a designated authority,

  • classification certificate” and “video work” have the same meanings as in the Video Recordings Act 1984 (c.39),

  • designated authority” means an authority which has been designated by the Secretary of State under section 4 of that Act,

  • extract” includes an extract of a single image,

  • image” is to be construed in accordance with section 51A.

51CExtreme pornography: defences

(1)Where a person (“A”) is charged with an offence under section 51A, it is a defence for A to prove one or more of the matters mentioned in subsection (2).

(2)The matters are—

(a)that A had a legitimate reason for being in possession of the image concerned,

(b)that A had not seen the image concerned and did not know, nor had any cause to suspect, it to be an extreme pornographic image,

(c)that A—

(i)was sent the image concerned without any prior request having been made by or on behalf of A, and

(ii)did not keep it for an unreasonable time.

(3)Where A is charged with an offence under section 51A, it is a defence for A to prove that—

(a)A directly participated in the act depicted, and

(b)subsection (4) applies.

(4)This subsection applies—

(a)in the case of an image which depicts an act described in subsection (6)(a) of that section, if the act depicted did not actually take or threaten a person's life,

(b)in the case of an image which depicts an act described in subsection (6)(b) of that section, if the act depicted did not actually result in (nor was it actually likely to result in) a person's severe injury,

(c)in the case of an image which depicts an act described in subsection (6)(c) of that section, if the act depicted did not actually involve non-consensual activity,

(d)in the case of an image which depicts an act described in subsection (6)(d) of that section, if what is depicted as a human corpse was not in fact a corpse,

(e)in the case of an image which depicts an act described in subsection (6)(e) of that section, if what is depicted as an animal (or the carcase of an animal) was not in fact an animal (or a carcase).

(5)The defence under subsection (3) is not available if A shows, gives or offers for sale the image to any person who was not also a direct participant in the act depicted.

(6)In this section “image” and “extreme pornographic image” are to be construed in accordance with section 51A..

(3)In Schedule 3 to the Sexual Offences Act 2003 (c.42) (sexual offences for the purposes of Part 2 of that Act), after paragraph 44 insert—

44AAn offence under section 51A of the Civic Government (Scotland) Act 1982 (c.45) (possession of extreme pornography) if—

(a)the offender—

(i)was 18 or over, and

(ii)is or has been sentenced in respect of the offence to imprisonment for a term of more than 12 months, and

(b)in imposing sentence, the court determines that it is appropriate that Part 2 of this Act should apply in relation to the offender..

43Voyeurism: additional forms of conductS

(1)The Sexual Offences (Scotland) Act 2009 (asp 9) is amended as follows.

(2)In section 9 (voyeurism)—

(a)after subsection (4), insert—

(4A)The fourth thing is that A—

(a)without another person (“B”) consenting, and

(b)without any reasonable belief that B consents,

operates equipment beneath B's clothing with the intention of enabling A or another person (“C”), for a purpose mentioned in subsection (7), to observe B's genitals or buttocks (whether exposed or covered with underwear) or the underwear covering B's genitals or buttocks, in circumstances where the genitals, buttocks or underwear would not otherwise be visible.

(4B)The fifth thing is that A—

(a)without another person (“B”) consenting, and

(b)without any reasonable belief that B consents,

records an image beneath B's clothing of B's genitals or buttocks (whether exposed or covered with underwear) or the underwear covering B's genitals or buttocks, in circumstances where the genitals, buttocks or underwear would not otherwise be visible, with the intention that A or another person (“C”), for a purpose mentioned in subsection (7), will look at the image.,

(b)in subsection (5)—

(i)for “fourth” substitute “ sixth ”, and

(ii)for paragraph (b), substitute—

(b)constructs or adapts a structure or part of a structure,

with the intention of enabling A or another person to do an act referred to in subsection (2), (3), (4), (4A) or (4B)., and

(c)in subsection (7), for “and (4)” substitute “ , (4), (4A) and (4B) ”.

(3)In section 10(2) (interpretation of section 9), after “section 9(3)” insert “ and (4A) ”.

(4)In section 26 (voyeurism towards a young child)—

(a)after subsection (4), insert—

(4A)The fourth thing is that A operates equipment beneath B's clothing with the intention of enabling A or another person (“C”), for a purpose mentioned in subsection (7), to observe—

(a)B's genitals or buttocks (whether exposed or covered with underwear), or

(b)the underwear covering B's genitals or buttocks,

in circumstances where the genitals, buttocks or underwear would not otherwise be visible.

(4B)The fifth thing is that A records an image beneath B's clothing of—

(a)B's genitals or buttocks (whether exposed or covered with underwear), or

(b)the underwear covering B's genitals or buttocks,

in circumstances where the genitals, buttocks or underwear would not otherwise be visible, with the intention that A or another person (“C”), for a purpose mentioned in subsection (7), will look at the image.,

(b)in subsection (5)—

(i)for “fourth” substitute “ sixth ”, and

(ii)for paragraph (b), substitute—

(b)constructs or adapts a structure or part of a structure,

with the intention of enabling A or another person to do an act referred to in subsection (2), (3), (4), (4A) or (4B).,

(c)in subsection (7), for “and (4)” substitute “ , (4), (4A) and (4B) ”, and

(d)in subsection (8)—

(i)after “section 9(3)” insert “ , (4A) ”, and

(ii)after “subsections (3)” insert “ , (4A) ”.

(5)In section 36 (voyeurism towards an older child)—

(a)after subsection (4), insert—

(4A)The fourth thing is that A operates equipment beneath B's clothing with the intention of enabling A or another person (“C”), for a purpose mentioned in subsection (7), to observe—

(a)B's genitals or buttocks (whether exposed or covered with underwear), or

(b)the underwear covering B's genitals or buttocks,

in circumstances where the genitals, buttocks or underwear would not otherwise be visible.

(4B)The fifth thing is that A records an image beneath B's clothing of—

(a)B's genitals or buttocks (whether exposed or covered with underwear), or

(b)the underwear covering B's genitals or buttocks,

in circumstances where the genitals, buttocks or underwear would not otherwise be visible, with the intention that A or another person (“C”), for a purpose mentioned in subsection (7), will look at the image.,

(b)in subsection (5)—

(i)for “fourth” substitute “ sixth ”, and

(ii)for paragraph (b), substitute—

(b)constructs or adapts a structure or part of a structure,

with the intention of enabling A or another person to do an act referred to in subsection (2), (3), (4), (4A) or (4B).,

(c)in subsection (7), for “and (4)” substitute “ , (4), (4A) and (4B) ”, and

(d)in subsection (8)—

(i)after “section 9(3)” insert “ , (4A) ”, and

(ii)after “subsections (3)” insert “ , (4A) ”.

44Sexual offences: defences in relation to offences against older childrenS

In section 39 of the Sexual Offences (Scotland) Act 2009 (asp 9) (defences in relation to offences against older children), in subsection (4)(c), after “section 30(2)(d)” insert “ or (e) ”.

45Penalties for offences of brothel-keeping and living on the earnings of prostitutionS

(1)The Criminal Law (Consolidation) (Scotland) Act 1995 (c.39) is amended as follows.

(2)In section 11 (trading in prostitution and brothel-keeping)—

(a)in subsection (1), for the words from “liable” to the end substitute “ guilty of an offence and liable to the penalties set out in subsection (1A) ”,

(b)after that subsection insert—

(1A)A person—

(a)guilty of the offence set out in subsection (1)(a) is liable—

(i)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding seven years, to a fine, or to both,

(ii)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months, to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum, or to both,

(b)guilty of the offence set out in subsection (1)(b) is liable—

(i)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years,

(ii)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months.,

(c)in subsection (4), for “subsection (1)” substitute “ subsection (1A)(a) ”, and

(d)for subsection (6) substitute—

(6)A person guilty of an offence under subsection (5) is liable—

(a)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding seven years, to a fine, or to both,

(b)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months, to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum, or to both..

(3)In section 13(9) (living on earnings of another from male prostitution), for paragraphs (a) and (b) substitute—

(a)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding seven years, to a fine, or to both,

(b)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months, to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum, or to both..

People traffickingS

46People traffickingS

(1)In section 22 of the Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act 2003 (asp 7) (traffic in prostitution etc.)—

(a)in subsection (1)(a)—

(i)after “arrival in” insert “ or the entry into ”, and

(ii)after “such arrival” insert “ or entry ”,

(b)after subsection (1) insert—

(1A)A person to whom subsection (6) applies commits an offence if the person arranges or facilitates—

(a)the arrival in or the entry into a country (other than the United Kingdom), or travel there (whether or not following such arrival or entry) by, an individual and—

(i)intends to exercise control over prostitution by the individual or to involve the individual in the making or production of obscene or indecent material; or

(ii)believes that another person is likely to exercise such control or so to involve the individual,

there or elsewhere; or

(b)the departure from a country (other than the United Kingdom) of an individual and—

(i)intends to exercise such control or so to involve the individual; or

(ii)believes that another person is likely to exercise such control or so to involve the individual,

outwith the country.,

(c)in subsection (2), for “subsection (1)” substitute “ subsections (1) and (1A) ”,

(d)for subsection (4) substitute—

(4)Subsections (1) and (1A) apply to anything done in or outwith the United Kingdom.,

(e)for subsection (5) substitute—

(5)A person may be prosecuted, tried and punished for any offence to which this section applies—

(a)in any sheriff court district in which the person is apprehended or is in custody, or

(b)in such sheriff court district as the Lord Advocate may determine,

as if the offence had been committed in that district (and the offence is, for all purposes incidental to or consequential on the trial or punishment, to be deemed to have been committed in that district)., and

(f)in subsection (6)—

(i)the word “and” immediately following paragraph (e) is repealed, and

(ii)after paragraph (f) insert—

(g)a person who at the time of the offence was habitually resident in Scotland, and

(h)a body incorporated under the law of a part of the United Kingdom..

(2)In section 4 of the Asylum and Immigration (Treatment of Claimants, etc.) Act 2004 (c.19) (trafficking people for exploitation)—

(a)in subsection (1), after “arrival in” insert “ or the entry into ”,

(b)in subsection (2), the words from “in” where it first occurs to “committed” are repealed,

(c)after subsection (3) insert—

(3A)A person to whom section 5(2) applies commits an offence if—

(a)in relation to an individual (the “passenger”), he arranges or facilitates—

(i)the arrival in or the entry into a country other than the United Kingdom of the passenger,

(ii)travel by the passenger within a country other than the United Kingdom,

(iii)the departure of the passenger from a country other than the United Kingdom, and

(b)he—

(i)intends to exploit the passenger, or

(ii)believes that another person is likely to exploit the passenger,

(wherever the exploitation is to occur)., and

(d)in subsection (4)—

(i)in paragraph (b), the words from “as a result” to “Act 2004,” become sub-paragraph (i),

(ii)immediately following that sub-paragraph insert or

(ii)which, were it done in Scotland, would constitute an offence mentioned in sub-paragraph (i),,

(iii)after paragraph (b) insert—

(ba)he is encouraged, required or expected to do anything in connection with the removal of any part of a human body—

(i)as a result of which he or another person would commit an offence under the law of Scotland (other than an offence mentioned in paragraph (b)(i)), or

(ii)which, were it done in Scotland, would constitute such an offence,, and

(iv)for paragraph (d) substitute—

(d)another person uses or attempts to use him for any purpose within sub-paragraph (i), (ii) or (iii) of paragraph (c), having chosen him for that purpose on the grounds that—

(i)he is mentally or physically ill or disabled, he is young, or he has a family relationship with a person, and

(ii)a person without the illness, disability, youth or family relationship would be likely to refuse to be used for that purpose..

(3)In section 5 of that Act—

(a)in subsection (1), for the words from “(3)” to the end substitute “ (3A) of section 4 apply to anything done in or outwith the United Kingdom. ”,

(b)in subsection (2)—

(i)the word “and” immediately following paragraph (e) is repealed, and

(ii)after paragraph (f) insert—

(g)a person who at the time of the offence was habitually resident in Scotland, and

(h)a body incorporated under the law of a part of the United Kingdom., and

(c)after subsection (2) insert—

(2A)A person may be prosecuted, tried and punished for any offence to which section 4 applies—

(a)in any sheriff court district in which the person is apprehended or is in custody, or

(b)in such sheriff court district as the Lord Advocate may determine,

as if the offence had been committed in that district (and the offence is, for all purposes incidental to or consequential on the trial or punishment, to be deemed to have been committed in that district).

(2B)In subsection (2A), “sheriff court district” is to be construed in accordance with section 307(1) of the Criminal Procedure (Scotland) Act 1995 (c.46) (interpretation)..

Slavery, servitude and forced or compulsory labourS

47Slavery, servitude and forced or compulsory labourS

(1)A person (“A”) commits an offence if—

(a)A holds another person in slavery or servitude and the circumstances are such that A knows or ought to know that the person is so held, or

(b)A requires another person to perform forced or compulsory labour and the circumstances are such that A knows or ought to know that the person is being required to perform such labour.

(2)In subsection (1) the references to holding a person in slavery or servitude or requiring a person to perform forced or compulsory labour are to be construed in accordance with Article 4 of the Human Rights Convention (which prohibits a person from being held in slavery or servitude or being required to perform forced or compulsory labour).

(3)A person guilty of an offence under this section is liable—

(a)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 14 years, or to a fine, or to both,

(b)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months, or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum, or to both.

(4)In this section “Human Rights Convention” means the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms agreed by the Council of Europe at Rome on 4 November 1950.

Fraud and embezzlementS

48Alternative charges for fraud and embezzlementS

In Schedule 3 to the 1995 Act (indictments and complaints), after paragraph 8(3) insert—

(3A)Under an indictment or a complaint for breach of trust and embezzlement, an accused may be convicted of falsehood, fraud and wilful imposition.

(3B)Under an indictment or a complaint for falsehood, fraud and wilful imposition, an accused may be convicted of breach of trust and embezzlement..

49Articles for use in fraudS

(1)A person (“A”) commits an offence if A has in A's possession or under A's control an article for use in, or in connection with, the commission of fraud.

(2)A person guilty of an offence under subsection (1) is liable—

(a)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum, or to both,

(b)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 5 years or to a fine, or to both.

(3)A person commits an offence if the person makes, adapts, supplies or offers to supply an article—

(a)knowing that the article is designed or adapted for use in, or in connection with, the commission of fraud, or

(b)intending the article to be used in, or in connection with, the commission of fraud.

(4)A person guilty of an offence under subsection (3) is liable—

(a)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months or to a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum, or to both,

(b)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 10 years or to a fine, or to both.

(5)In this section, “article” includes a program or data held in electronic form.

ConspiracyS

50Conspiracy to commit offences outwith ScotlandS

(1)The title of section 11A of the 1995 Act becomes “Conspiracy to commit offences outwith Scotland”.

(2)In that section—

(a)in subsection (1), for “in a country or territory outside the United Kingdom” substitute “ outwith Scotland ”,

(b)in subsection (3)—

(i)for “the law in force in the country or territory where the act or other event was intended to take place” substitute “ the relevant law ”, and

(ii)for “the law in force in the country or territory” where it second occurs substitute “ that law ”, and

(c)after subsection (3) insert—

(3A)In subsection (3) above, “the relevant law” is—

(a)if the act or event was intended to take place in another part of the United Kingdom, the law in force in that part,

(b)if the act or event was intended to take place in a country or territory outwith the United Kingdom, the law in force in that country or territory..

Abolition of offences of sedition and leasing-makingS

51Abolition of offences of sedition and leasing-makingS

The following offences under the common law of Scotland are abolished—

(a)the offence of sedition,

(b)the offence of leasing-making.

PART 3 SCRIMINAL PROCEDURE

ChildrenS

52Prosecution of childrenS

(1)The 1995 Act is amended as follows.

(2)After section 41 insert—

41AProsecution of children under 12

(1)A child under the age of 12 years may not be prosecuted for an offence.

(2)A person aged 12 years or more may not be prosecuted for an offence which was committed at a time when the person was under the age of 12 years..

(3)In section 42 (prosecution of children), in subsection (1)—

(a)for “No child under the age of 16 years shall” substitute “ A child aged 12 years or more but under 16 years may not ”,

(b)for “his instance” substitute “ the instance of the Lord Advocate ”, and

(c)for “a child under the age of 16 years” substitute “ such a child ”.

(4)In section 234AA (antisocial behaviour order), in subsection (2), paragraph (b) is repealed.

Offences: liability of partnersS

53Offences: liability of partnersS

(1)A partner of a partnership (other than a limited liability partnership) is guilty of a corporate offence where—

(a)the partnership is guilty of the corporate offence, and

(b)it is proved that the corporate offence committed by the partnership—

(i)was committed with the consent or connivance of the partner (whether alone or among others), or

(ii)was attributable to the neglect of the partner (whether alone or among others).

(2)In subsection (1), a “corporate offence” is an offence in relation to which an enactment has the effect that where—

(a)a body corporate is guilty of the offence, and

(b)it is proved that the offence—

(i)was committed with the consent or connivance of a director (whether alone or among others), or

(ii)was attributable to the neglect of a director (whether alone or among others),

the director (as well as the body corporate) is guilty of the offence.

(3)In subsection (1), the references to a partner of a partnership include references to a person purporting to act as a partner of the partnership.

(4)Subsection (1) does not apply in relation to a corporate offence if an enactment (other than subsection (1)) makes provision in relation to the offence having the same effect as that subsection.

Witness statementsS

54Witness statementsS

(1)This section applies where—

(a)in the course of a criminal investigation, a witness makes a statement in relation to the matter to which the investigation relates,

(b)the statement is contained in a document, and

(c)the witness is likely to be cited to give evidence in criminal proceedings arising from the matter.

(2)Before the witness gives evidence in the criminal proceedings, the prosecutor may—

(a)give the witness a copy of the statement, or

(b)make the statement available for inspection by the witness at a reasonable time and in a reasonable place.

(3)Section 262 of the 1995 Act (interpretation of certain expressions for purposes of sections 259 to 261A of that Act) applies for the purposes of this section as it applies for the purposes of section 261A of that Act except that for the purposes of this section “statement” does not include a victim statement.

Police liberationS

55Breach of undertakingS

After section 22 of the 1995 Act insert—

22ZAOffences where undertaking breached

(1)A person who without reasonable excuse breaches an undertaking given by the person under section 22—

(a)by reason of failing to appear at court as required under subsection (1C)(a) of section 22, or

(b)by reason of failing to comply with a condition imposed under subsection (1D) of that section,

is guilty of an offence.

(2)A person who is guilty of an offence under subsection (1) is liable on summary conviction to—

(a)a fine not exceeding level 3 on the standard scale, and

(b)imprisonment for a period—

(i)where conviction is in the JP court, not exceeding 60 days,

(ii)where conviction is in the sheriff court, not exceeding 12 months.

(3)Despite subsection (1)(b), where (and to the extent that) the person breaches the undertaking by reason of committing an offence while subject to the undertaking—

(a)the person is not guilty of an offence under that subsection, and

(b)subsection (4) applies instead.

(4)The court, in determining the sentence for the subsequent offence, must have regard to—

(a)the fact that the subsequent offence was committed in breach of the undertaking,

(b)the number of undertakings to which the person was subject when that offence was committed,

(c)any previous conviction of the person of an offence under subsection (1)(b),

(d)the extent to which the sentence or disposal in respect of any previous conviction differed, by virtue of this subsection, from that which the court would have imposed but for this subsection.

(5)The reference in subsection (4)(c) to any previous conviction of an offence under subsection (1)(b) includes any previous conviction by a court in England and Wales, Northern Ireland or a member State of the European Union other than the United Kingdom of an offence that is equivalent to an offence under subsection (1)(b).

(6)The references in subsection (4)(d) to subsection (4) are to be read, in relation to a previous conviction by a court referred to in subsection (5), as references to any provision that is equivalent to subsection (4).

(7)Any issue of equivalence arising in pursuance of subsection (5) or (6) is for the court to determine.

(8)Subsections (3)(b) and (4) apply only if the fact that the subsequent offence was committed while the person was subject to an undertaking is specified in the complaint or indictment.

(9)In this section and section 22ZB, “the subsequent offence” is the offence committed by a person while the person is subject to an undertaking.

22ZBEvidential and procedural provision

(1)In any proceedings in relation to an offence under section 22ZA(1), the fact that a person—

(a)breached an undertaking given by the person under section 22 by reason of failing to appear at court as required under subsection (1C)(a) of that section, or

(b)was subject to any particular condition imposed under subsection (1D) of that section,

is, unless challenged by preliminary objection before the person's plea is recorded, to be held as admitted.

(2)In any proceedings in relation to an offence under section 22ZA(1) or (as the case may be) the subsequent offence—

(a)something in writing, purporting to be an undertaking given by a person under section 22 (and bearing to be signed and certified), is sufficient evidence of the terms of the undertaking so given,

(b)a document purporting to be a notice (or copy of a notice) effected under subsection (1F) of that section is sufficient evidence of the terms of the notice,

(c)an undertaking whose terms are modified under paragraph (b) of that subsection is to be regarded as if given in the terms as so modified.

(3)The fact that the subsequent offence was committed while the person was subject to an undertaking is to be held as admitted, unless challenged—

(a)in summary proceedings, by preliminary objection before the person's plea is recorded, or

(b)in the case of proceedings on indictment, by giving notice of a preliminary objection in accordance with section 71(2) or 72(6)(b)(i) of this Act.

(4)Where the maximum penalty in respect of the subsequent offence is specified by (or by virtue of) any enactment, that maximum penalty is, for the purposes of the court's determination of the appropriate sentence or disposal in respect of that offence, increased—

(a)where it is a fine, by the amount equivalent to level 3 on the standard scale, and

(b)where it is a period of imprisonment—

(i)as respects conviction in the JP court, by 60 days,

(ii)as respects conviction in the sheriff court or the High Court, by 6 months,

even if the maximum penalty as so increased exceeds the penalty which it would otherwise be competent for the court to impose.

(5)A penalty under section 22ZA(2) may be imposed in addition to any other penalty which it is competent for the court to impose even if the total of penalties imposed may exceed the maximum penalty which it is competent to impose in respect of the original offence.

(6)The reference in subsection (5) to a penalty being imposed in addition to another penalty means, in the case of sentences of imprisonment or detention—

(a)where the sentences are imposed at the same time (whether or not in relation to the same complaint), framing the sentences so that they have effect consecutively,

(b)where the sentences are imposed at different times, framing the sentence imposed later so that (if the earlier sentence has not been served) the later sentence has effect consecutive to the earlier sentence.

(7)Subsection (6)(b) is subject to section 204A of this Act.

(8)The court must state—

(a)where the sentence or disposal in respect of the subsequent offence is different from that which the court would have imposed but for section 22ZA(4), the extent of and the reasons for that difference, or

(b)otherwise, the reasons for there being no such difference.

(9)A court which finds a person guilty of an offence under section 22ZA(1) may remit that person for sentence in respect of that offence to any court which is considering the original offence.

(10)At any time before the trial of an accused in summary proceedings for the original offence, it is competent to amend the complaint to include an additional charge of an offence under section 22ZA(1).

(11)In this section, “the original offence” is the offence in relation to which an undertaking is given..

Grant of warrantsS

56Grant of warrants for execution by constables and police members of SCDEAS

(1)A sheriff or justice of the peace does not lack power or jurisdiction to grant a warrant for execution by a person mentioned in subsection (2) solely because the person is not a constable of a police force for a police area lying wholly or partly in the sheriff's or justice's sheriffdom.

(2)The persons referred to in subsection (1) are—

(a)a constable,

(b) police member of the Scottish Crime and Drug Enforcement Agency.

BailS

57Bail review applicationsS

(1)The 1995 Act is amended as follows.

(2)In section 30 (bail review)—

(a)for subsection (2A) substitute—

(2A)On receipt of an application under subsection (2), the court must—

(a)intimate the application to the prosecutor, and

(b)before determining the application, give the prosecutor an opportunity to be heard.

(2AA)Despite subsection (2A)(b), the court may grant the application without having heard the prosecutor if the prosecutor consents., and

(b)in subsection (2C), in paragraph (b), for “heard” substitute “ determined ”.

(3)In section 31 (bail review on prosecutor's application)—

(a)after subsection (2), insert—

(2ZA)Despite subsection (2)(b), the court may grant the application without fixing a hearing if the person granted bail consents., and

(b)in subsection (3), the word “hearing” is repealed.

58Bail condition for identification procedures etc.S

In section 24 of the 1995 Act (bail and bail conditions)—

(a)in paragraph (b) of subsection (4), sub-paragraph (ii) and the word “and” immediately preceding it are repealed, and

(b)in subsection (5), after paragraph (ca) insert—

(cb)whenever reasonably instructed by a constable to do so—

(i)participates in an identification parade or other identification procedure; and

(ii)allows any print, impression or sample to be taken from the accused;.

59Bail conditions: remote monitoring requirementsS

Sections 24A to 24E of the 1995 Act (bail conditions: remote monitoring) are repealed.

Prosecution on indictmentS

60Prosecution on indictment: Scottish Law OfficersS

(1)The 1995 Act is amended as follows.

(2)In section 64 (prosecution on indictment), in subsection (1), for “in name” substitute “ at the instance ”.

(3)The title of section 287 becomes “Demission from office of Lord Advocate and Solicitor General for Scotland”.

(4)In that section—

(a)in subsection (1)—

(i)for “by a Lord Advocate” substitute “ at the instance of Her Majesty's Advocate ”,

(ii)for “his” where it first occurs substitute “ the holder of the office of Lord Advocate ”, and

(iii)after “successor” insert “ or the Solicitor General ”,

(b)in subsection (2)—

(i)for “in name of” substitute “ at the instance of Her Majesty's Advocate or ”, and

(ii)the words “then in office” are repealed,

(c)after subsection (2), insert—

(2A)Any such indictments in proceedings at the instance of the Solicitor General may be signed by the Solicitor General.

(2B)All indictments which have been raised at the instance of the Solicitor General shall remain effective notwithstanding the holder of the office of Solicitor General subsequently having died or demitted office and may be taken up and proceeded with by his successor or the Lord Advocate.

(2C)Subsection (2D) applies during any period when the offices of Lord Advocate and Solicitor General are both vacant.

(2D)It is lawful to indict accused persons at the instance of Her Majesty's Advocate., and

(d)in subsection (4)—

(i)after “Advocate” insert “ or Solicitor General ”,

(ii)in paragraph (a), after “subsection (1)” insert “ or (2B) ”,

(iii)in paragraph (b), for “in the name” substitute “ raised at the instance ”, and

(iv)after that paragraph, insert—

(c)by virtue of subsection (2D) above, is raised at the instance of Her Majesty's Advocate.

(5)In Schedule 2, the words “A.F.R. (name of Lord Advocate),” are repealed.

Transfer of justice of the peace court casesS

61Transfer of justice of the peace court casesS

After section 137C of the 1995 Act insert—

137CATransfer of JP court proceedings within sheriffdom

(1)Subsection (2) applies—

(a)where the accused person has been cited in summary proceedings to attend a diet of a JP court, or

(b)if the accused person has not been cited to such a diet, where summary proceedings against the accused have been commenced in a JP court.

(2)The prosecutor may apply to a justice for an order for the transfer of the proceedings to another JP court in the sheriffdom (and for adjournment to a diet of that court).

(3)On an application under subsection (2), the justice may make the order sought.

(4)In this section and sections 137CB and 137CC, “justice” does not include the sheriff.

137CBTransfer of JP court proceedings outwith sheriffdom

(1)Subsection (2) applies where the clerk of a JP court informs the prosecutor that, because of exceptional circumstances which could not reasonably have been foreseen, it is not practicable for the JP court or any other JP court in the sheriffdom to proceed with some or all of the summary cases due to call at a diet.

(2)The prosecutor shall as soon as practicable apply to the sheriff principal for an order for the transfer of the proceedings to a JP court in another sheriffdom (and for adjournment to a diet of that court).

(3)Subsection (4) applies where—

(a)either—

(i)the accused person has been cited in summary proceedings to attend a diet of a JP court, or

(ii)if the accused person has not been cited to such a diet, summary proceedings against the accused have been commenced in a JP court, and

(b)there are also summary proceedings against the accused person in a JP court in another sheriffdom.

(4)The prosecutor may apply to a justice for an order for the transfer of the proceedings to a JP court in the other sheriffdom (and for adjournment to a diet of that court).

(5)Subsection (6) applies where—

(a)the prosecutor intends to take summary proceedings against an accused person in a JP court, and

(b)there are also summary proceedings against the accused person in a JP court in another sheriffdom.

(6)The prosecutor may apply to a justice for an order for authority for the proceedings to be taken at a JP court in the other sheriffdom.

(7)On an application under subsection (2), the sheriff principal may make the order sought with the consent of the sheriff principal of the other sheriffdom.

(8)On an application under subsection (4) or (6), the justice is to make the order sought if—

(a)the justice considers that it would be expedient for the different cases involved to be dealt with by the same court, and

(b)a justice of the other sheriffdom consents.

(9)On the application of the prosecutor, the sheriff principal who has made an order under subsection (7) may, with the consent of the sheriff principal of the other sheriffdom—

(a)revoke the order, or

(b)vary it so as to restrict its effect.

(10)On the application of the prosecutor, the justice who has made an order under subsection (8) (or another justice of the same sheriffdom) may, with the consent of a justice of the other sheriffdom—

(a)revoke the order, or

(b)vary it so as to restrict its effect.

137CCCustody cases: initiating JP court proceedings outwith sheriffdom

(1)Subsection (2) applies where the prosecutor believes—

(a)that, because of exceptional circumstances (and without an order under subsection (3)), it is likely that there would be an unusually high number of accused persons appearing from custody for the first calling of cases in summary prosecutions in the JP courts in the sheriffdom, and

(b)that it would not be practicable for those courts to deal with all the cases involved.

(2)The prosecutor may apply to the sheriff principal for an order authorising summary proceedings against some or all of the accused persons to be—

(a)taken at a JP court in another sheriffdom, and

(b)maintained—

(i)at that JP court, or

(ii)at any of the JP courts referred to in subsection (1) as may at the first calling of the case be appointed for further proceedings.

(3)On an application under subsection (2), the sheriff principal may make the order sought with the consent of the sheriff principal of the other sheriffdom.

(4)An order under subsection (3) may be made by reference to a particular period or particular circumstances..

Additions to complaintS

62Additional charge where bail etc. breachedS

(1)In section 27 of the 1995 Act (breach of bail conditions: offences), after subsection (8) insert—

(8A)At any time before the trial of an accused in summary proceedings for the original offence, it is competent to amend the complaint to include an additional charge of an offence under this section..

(2)In section 150 of that Act (failure of accused to appear), for subsection (10) substitute—

(10)At any time before the trial in the prosecution in which the failure to appear occurred, it is competent to amend the complaint to include an additional charge of an offence under subsection (8)..

Dockets and charges in sex casesS

63Dockets and charges in sex casesS

After section 288B of the 1995 Act insert—

Dockets and charges in sex casesS
288BADockets for charges of sexual offences

(1)An indictment or a complaint may include a docket which specifies any act or omission that is connected with a sexual offence charged in the indictment or complaint.

(2)Here, an act or omission is connected with such an offence charged if it—

(a)is specifiable by way of reference to a sexual offence, and

(b)relates to—

(i)the same event as the offence charged, or

(ii)a series of events of which that offence is also part.

(3)The docket is to be in the form of a note apart from the offence charged.

(4)It does not matter whether the act or omission, if it were instead charged as an offence, could not competently be dealt with by the court (including as particularly constituted) in which the indictment or complaint is proceeding.

(5)Where under subsection (1) a docket is included in an indictment or a complaint, it is to be presumed that—

(a)the accused person has been given fair notice of the prosecutor's intention to lead evidence of the act or omission specified in the docket, and

(b)evidence of the act or omission is admissible as relevant.

(6)The references in this section to a sexual offence are to—

(a)an offence under the Sexual Offences (Scotland) Act 2009,

(b)any other offence involving a significant sexual element.

288BBMixed charges for sexual offences

(1)An indictment or a complaint may include a charge that is framed as mentioned in subsection (2) or (3) (or both).

(2)That is, framed so as to comprise (in a combined form) the specification of more than one sexual offence.

(3)That is, framed so as to—

(a)specify, in addition to a sexual offence, any other act or omission, and

(b)do so in any manner except by way of reference to a statutory offence.

(4)Where a charge in an indictment or a complaint is framed as mentioned in subsection (2) or (3) (or both), the charge is to be regarded as being a single yet cumulative charge.

(5)The references in this section to a sexual offence are to an offence under the Sexual Offences (Scotland) Act 2009.

288BCAggravation by intent to rape

(1)Subsection (2) applies as respects a qualifying offence charged in an indictment or a complaint.

(2)Any specification in the charge that the offence is with intent to rape (however construed) may be given by referring to the statutory offence of rape.

(3)In this section—

(a)the reference to a qualifying offence is to an offence of assault or abduction (and includes attempt, conspiracy or incitement to commit such an offence),

(b)the reference to the statutory offence of rape is (as the case may be) to—

(i)the offence of rape under section 1 of the Sexual Offences (Scotland) Act 2009, or

(ii)the offence of rape of a young child under section 18 of that Act..

Remand and committal of childrenS

64Remand and committal of children and young personsS

(1)Section 51 of the 1995 Act (remand and committal of children and young persons) is amended in accordance with subsections (2) and (3).

(2)The following provisions are repealed—

(a)in subsection (1)—

(i)in paragraph (a) the words from “but” to “applies”, and

(ii)paragraph (bb),

(b)in subsection (2A), the words “Subject to subsection (4) below”,

(c)subsections (3) and (4), and

(d)in subsection (4A), the words “or subsection (4) above”.

(3)In subsection (5), for “(1)(aa), (b)(ii), (bb)(ii) or (3)(b)” substitute “ (1)(aa) or (b)(ii) ”.

(4)In section 23 of the Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act 2003 (asp 7) (remand and committal of children and young persons), subsections (6) and (7) are repealed.

Prosecution of organisationsS

65Meaning of “organisation”S

In section 307(1) of the 1995 Act (interpretation), after the definition of “order for lifelong restriction”, insert— organisation” means—

(a)a body corporate;

(b)an unincorporated association;

(c)a partnership;

(d)a body of trustees;

(e)a government department;

(f)a part of the Scottish Administration;

(g)any other entity which is not an individual;.

66Proceedings on indictment against organisationsS

(1)The title of section 70 of the 1995 Act (proceedings against bodies corporate) is amended by substituting “ organisations ” for “bodies corporate”.

(2)Section 70 of that Act is amended as follows.

(3)In subsection (1), for “a body corporate” substitute “ an organisation ”.

(4)For subsection (2) substitute—

(2)The indictment may be served by delivery of a copy of the indictment together with notice to appear at—

(a)in the case of a body of trustees—

(i)the dwelling-house or place of business of any of the trustees, or

(ii)if the solicitor of the body of trustees is known, the place of business of the solicitor,

(b)in the case of any other organisation, the registered office or, if there is no registered office or the registered office is not in the United Kingdom, at the principal place of business in the United Kingdom of the organisation..

(5)In subsection (3)—

(a)for “the registered office or principal place of business of the body corporate” substitute “ any place ”, and

(b)for “the registered office or place of business” substitute “ that place ”.

(6)In subsection (4)—

(a)for “A body corporate” substitute “ An organisation ”, and

(b)the words “of the body corporate” are repealed.

(7)In subsection (5), for “body corporate” in both places that expression occurs substitute “ organisation ”.

(8)In subsection (5A)(a), for “body corporate” substitute “ organisation ”.

(9)In subsection (6)—

(a)for “a body corporate” substitute “ an organisation ”, and

(b)for “the body corporate” substitute “ the organisation ”.

(10)In subsection (7), for “a body corporate” substitute “ an organisation ”.

(11)In subsection (8), for paragraph (c) substitute—

(ba)in the case of a partnership (other than a limited liability partnership), a partner or other person in charge, or locally in charge, of the partnership's affairs;

(bb)in the case of an unincorporated association, the secretary or other person in charge, or locally in charge, of the association's affairs;

(c)in the case of any other organisation, an employee, officer or official of the organisation duly appointed by it for the purposes of the proceedings..

(12)In subsection (9), after paragraph (b) insert—

(c)in the case of a partnership (other than a limited liability partnership), purporting to be signed by a partner;

(d)in the case of an unincorporated association, purporting to be signed by an officer of the association;

(e)in the case of a government department or a part of the Scottish Administration, purporting to be signed by a senior officer in the department or part,.

67Prosecution of organisations by summary procedureS

(1)Section 143 of 1995 Act (prosecution of companies etc.) is amended as follows.

(2)In subsection (1), for “a partnership, association, body corporate or body of trustees” substitute “ an organisation ”.

(3)In subsection (2), for “partnership, association, body corporate or body of trustees in their” substitute “ organisation in its ”.

(4)In subsection (4), for “A partnership, association, body corporate or body of trustees” substitute “ An organisation ”.

(5)In subsection (5)(b), for “of the partnership, association, body corporate or body of trustees” substitute “ , officer or official of the organisation ”.

(6)In subsection (6), after paragraph (d) insert—

(e)in the case of a government department or part of the Scottish Administration, purporting to be signed by a senior officer in the department or part,.

(7)In subsection (7)—

(a)for “a partnership, association, body corporate or body of trustees” substitute “ an organisation ”,

(b)for “partnership, association, body corporate or (as the case may be) body of trustees” substitute “ organisation ”.

68Manner of citation of organisations in summary proceedingsS

In section 141 of the 1995 Act (manner of citation), in subsection (2)(b), for “a partnership, association or body corporate” substitute “ an organisation other than a body of trustees ”.

Personal conduct of case by accusedS

69Prohibition of personal conduct of case by accused in certain proceedingsS

(1)The 1995 Act is amended as follows.

(2)In section 288C (prohibition of personal conduct of defence in cases of certain sexual offences)—

(a)for subsection (1) substitute—

(1)An accused charged with a sexual offence to which this section applies is prohibited from conducting his case in person at, or for the purposes of, any relevant hearing in the course of proceedings (other than proceedings in a JP court) in respect of the offence.

(1A)In subsection (1), “relevant hearing” means a hearing at, or for the purposes of, which a witness is to give evidence., and

(b)subsection (8) is repealed.

(3)In section 288D (appointment of solicitor by court in cases to which section 288C applies)—

(a)in subsection (1), after “proceedings” insert “ (other than proceedings in a JP court) ”,

(b)in subsection (2)(a), for sub-paragraphs (i) and (ii) substitute—

(i)the conduct of his case at, or for the purposes of, any relevant hearing (within the meaning of section 288C(1A)) in the proceedings; or, and

(c)in subsection (6), for the words from “of the accused's defence” to the end substitute “ referred to in subsection (2)(a) above. ”.

(4)In section 288E (prohibition of personal conduct of defence in certain cases involving child witness under the age of 12)—

(a)subsection (1) is repealed,

(b)in subsection (2)(b), for “the trial” substitute “ any hearing in the course of the proceedings ”,

(c)after subsection (2) insert—

(2A)The accused is prohibited from conducting his case in person at, or for the purposes of, any hearing at, or for the purposes of, which the child witness is to give evidence.,

(d)in subsection (4), at the end insert “ and as if references to a relevant hearing were references to a hearing referred to in subsection (2A) above ”,

(e)in subsection (6)—

(i)for paragraphs (za) and (a) substitute—

(a)that his case at, or for the purposes of, any hearing in the course of the proceedings at, or for the purposes of, which the child witness is to give evidence may be conducted only by a lawyer,, and

(ii)in paragraph (c), for the words from “preliminary” to “trial” substitute “ hearing ”, and

(f)subsection (8) is repealed.

(5)In section 288F (power to prohibit personal conduct of defence in other cases involving vulnerable witnesses)—

(a)in subsection (1), for “the trial” substitute “ any hearing in the course of the proceedings ”,

(b)in subsection (2), for the words from “defence” to the end substitute “ case in person at any hearing at, or for the purposes of, which the vulnerable witness is to give evidence. ”,

(c)in subsection (3)(a), for “trial” substitute “ hearing ”,

(d)in subsection (4), for the words from “after” to the end substitute “ in relation to a hearing after, as well as before, the hearing has commenced. ”,

(e)subsection (4A) is repealed,

(f)in subsection (5), at the end insert “ and as if references to a relevant hearing were references to any hearing in respect of which an order is made under this section ”, and

(g)subsection (6) is repealed.

Disclosure of convictions etc.S

70Disclosure of convictions and non-court disposalsS

(1)After section 101 of the 1995 Act insert—

101APost-offence convictions etc.

(1)This section applies where an accused person is convicted of an offence (“offence O”) on indictment.

(2)The court may, in deciding on the disposal of the case, have regard to—

(a)any conviction in respect of the accused which occurred on or after the date of offence O but before the date of conviction in respect of that offence,

(b)any of the alternative disposals in respect of the accused that are mentioned in subsection (3).

(3)Those alternative disposals are—

(a)a—

(i)fixed penalty under section 302(1) of this Act, or

(ii)compensation offer under section 302A(1) of this Act,

that has been accepted (or deemed to have been accepted) on or after the date of offence O but before the date of conviction in respect of that offence,

(b)a work order under section 303ZA(6) of this Act that has been completed on or after the date of offence O but before the date of conviction in respect of that offence.

(4)The court may have regard to any such conviction or alternative disposal only if it is—

(a)specified in a notice laid before the court by the prosecutor, and

(b)admitted by the accused or proved by the prosecutor (on evidence adduced then or at another diet).

(5)A reference in this section to a conviction which occurred on or after the date of offence O is a reference to such a conviction by a court in any part of the United Kingdom or in any other member State of the European Union..

(2)For section 166A of that Act substitute—

166APost-offence convictions etc.

(1)This section applies where an accused person is convicted of an offence (“offence O”) on summary complaint.

(2)The court may, in deciding on the disposal of the case, have regard to—

(a)any conviction in respect of the accused which occurred on or after the date of offence O but before the date of conviction in respect of that offence,

(b)any of the alternative disposals in respect of the accused that are mentioned in subsection (3).

(3)Those alternative disposals are—

(a)a—

(i)fixed penalty under section 302(1) of this Act, or

(ii)compensation offer under section 302A(1) of this Act,

that has been accepted (or deemed to have been accepted) on or after the date of offence O but before the date of conviction in respect of that offence,

(b)a work order under section 303ZA(6) of this Act that has been completed on or after the date of offence O but before the date of conviction in respect of that offence.

(4)The court may have regard to any such conviction or alternative disposal only if it is—

(a)specified in a notice laid before the court by the prosecutor, and

(b)admitted by the accused or proved by the prosecutor (on evidence adduced then or at another diet).

(5)A reference in this section to a conviction which occurred on or after the date of offence O is a reference to such a conviction by a court in any part of the United Kingdom or in any other member State of the European Union..

(3)In section 302 of that Act (fixed penalty: conditional offer by procurator fiscal), in subsection (2), after sub-paragraph (ii) of paragraph (e) insert—

(iia)that that fact may be disclosed to the court also in any proceedings for an offence to which the alleged offender is, or is liable to become, subject at such time as the offer is accepted;.

(4)In section 302A of that Act (compensation offer by procurator fiscal), in subsection (2), after sub-paragraph (ii) of paragraph (f) insert—

(iia)that that fact may be disclosed to the court also in any proceedings for an offence to which the alleged offender is, or is liable to become, subject at such time as the offer is accepted;.

(5)In section 303ZA of that Act (work orders), in subsection (3)—

(a)after sub-paragraph (i) of paragraph (e) insert—

(ia)that if a work offer is not accepted, that fact may be disclosed to the court in any proceedings for the offence to which the offer relates;,

(b)in sub-paragraph (ii) of that paragraph, for “the offer has been accepted” substitute “ a resultant work order has been completed ”,

(c)after sub-paragraph (ii) of that paragraph insert—

(iia)that that fact may be disclosed to the court also in any proceedings for an offence to which the alleged offender is, or is liable to become, subject at such time as the offer is accepted;, and

(d)in sub-paragraph (iii) of that paragraph, for “work order under subsection (6) below” substitute “ resultant work order ”.

71Convictions by courts in other EU member StatesS

(1)Schedule 4 makes modifications of the 1995 Act and other enactments for the purposes of and in connection with implementing obligations of the United Kingdom created by or arising under the Framework Decision (so far as they have effect in or as regards Scotland).

(2)The Scottish Ministers may by order make further provision for the purposes of and in connection with implementing those obligations.

(3)The provision may, in particular, confer functions—

(a)on the Scottish Ministers,

(b)on other persons.

(4)An order under subsection (2) may modify any enactment.

(5)In this section, the “Framework Decision” means Council Framework Decision 2008/675/JHA of 24 July 2008 on taking account of convictions in the Member States of the European Union in the course of new criminal proceedings.

Appeals: time limitsS

72Time limits for lodging certain appealsS

(1)The 1995 Act is amended as follows.

(2)In section 74 (appeals in connection with preliminary diets), in subsection (2)(b), for “2” substitute “ seven ”.

(3)In section 174 (appeals relating to preliminary pleas), in subsection (1), for “two” substitute “ seven ”.

Crown appealsS

73Submissions as to sufficiency of evidenceS

After section 97 of the 1995 Act insert—

97ASubmissions as to sufficiency of evidence

(1)Immediately after one or other (but not both) of the appropriate events, the accused may make either or both of the submissions mentioned in subsection (2) in relation to an offence libelled in an indictment (the “indicted offence”).

(2)The submissions are—

(a)that the evidence is insufficient in law to justify the accused's being convicted of the indicted offence or any other offence of which the accused could be convicted under the indictment (a “related offence”),

(b)that there is no evidence to support some part of the circumstances set out in the indictment.

(3)For the purposes of subsection (1), “the appropriate events” are—

(a)the close of the whole of the evidence,

(b)the conclusion of the prosecutor's address to the jury on the evidence.

(4)A submission made under this section must be heard by the judge in the absence of the jury.

97BAcquittals etc. on section 97A(2)(a) submissions

(1)This section applies where the accused makes a submission of the kind mentioned in section 97A(2)(a).

(2)If the judge is satisfied that the evidence is insufficient in law to justify the accused's being convicted of the indicted offence, then—

(a)where the judge is satisfied that the evidence is also insufficient in law to justify the accused's being convicted of a related offence—

(i)the judge must acquit the accused of the indicted offence, and

(ii)the trial is to proceed only in respect of any other offence libelled in the indictment,

(b)where the judge is satisfied that the evidence is sufficient in law to justify the accused's being convicted of a related offence, the judge must direct that the indictment be amended accordingly.

(3)If the judge is not satisfied as is mentioned in subsection (2)—

(a)the judge must reject the submission, and

(b)the trial is to proceed as if the submission had not been made.

(4)The judge may make a decision under this section only after hearing both (or all) parties.

(5)An amendment made by virtue of this section must be sufficiently authenticated by the initials of the judge or the clerk of court.

(6)In this section, “indicted offence” and “related offence” have the same meanings as in section 97A.

97CDirections etc. on section 97A(2)(b) submissions

(1)This section applies where the accused makes a submission of the kind mentioned in section 97A(2)(b).

(2)If the judge is satisfied that there is no evidence to support some part of the circumstances set out in the indictment, the judge must direct that the indictment be amended accordingly.

(3)If the judge is not satisfied as is mentioned in subsection (2)—

(a)the judge must reject the submission, and

(b)the trial is to proceed as if the submission had not been made.

(4)The judge may make a decision under this section only after hearing both (or all) parties.

(5)An amendment made by virtue of this section must be sufficiently authenticated by the initials of the judge or the clerk of court.

97DNo acquittal on “no reasonable jury” grounds

(1)A judge has no power to direct the jury to return a not guilty verdict on any charge on the ground that no reasonable jury, properly directed on the evidence, could convict on the charge.

(2)Accordingly, no submission based on that ground or any ground of like effect is to be allowed..

74Prosecutor's right of appealS

After section 107 of the 1995 Act insert—

107AProsecutor's right of appeal: decisions on section 97 and 97A submissions

(1)The prosecutor may appeal to the High Court against—

(a)an acquittal under section 97 or 97B(2)(a), or

(b)a direction under section 97B(2)(b) or 97C(2).

(2)If, immediately after an acquittal under section 97 or 97B(2)(a), the prosecutor moves for the trial diet to be adjourned for no more than 2 days in order to consider whether to appeal against the acquittal under subsection (1), the court of first instance must grant the motion unless the court considers that there are no arguable grounds of appeal.

(3)If, immediately after the giving of a direction under section 97B(2)(b) or 97C(2), the prosecutor moves for the trial diet to be adjourned for no more than 2 days in order to consider whether to appeal against the direction under subsection (1), the court of first instance must grant the motion unless the court considers that it would not be in the interests of justice to do so.

(4)In considering whether it would be in the interests of justice to grant a motion for adjournment under subsection (3), the court must have regard, amongst other things, to—

(a)whether, if an appeal were to be made and to be successful, continuing with the diet would have any impact on any subsequent or continued prosecution,

(b)whether there are any arguable grounds of appeal.

(5)An appeal may not be brought under subsection (1) unless the prosecutor intimates intention to appeal—

(a)immediately after the acquittal or, as the case may be, the giving of the direction,

(b)if a motion to adjourn the trial diet under subsection (2) or (3) is granted, immediately upon resumption of the diet, or

(c)if such a motion is refused, immediately after the refusal.

(6)Subsection (7) applies if—

(a)the prosecutor intimates an intention to appeal under subsection (1)(a), or

(b)the trial diet is adjourned under subsection (2).

(7)Where this subsection applies, the court of first instance must suspend the effect of the acquittal and may—

(a)make an order under section 4(2) of the Contempt of Court Act 1981 (c.49) (which gives a court power, in some circumstances, to order that publication of certain reports be postponed) as if proceedings for the offence of which the person was acquitted were pending or imminent,

(b)after giving the parties an opportunity of being heard, order the detention of the person in custody or admit him to bail.

(8)The court may, under subsection (7)(b), order the detention of the person in custody only if the court considers that there are arguable grounds of appeal.

107BProsecutor's right of appeal: decisions on admissibility of evidence

(1)The prosecutor may appeal to the High Court against a finding, made after the jury is empanelled and before the close of the evidence for the prosecution, that evidence that the prosecution seeks to lead is inadmissible.

(2)The appeal may be made only with the leave of the court of first instance, granted—

(a)on the motion of the prosecutor, or

(b)on that court's initiative.

(3)Any motion for leave to appeal must be made before the close of the case for the prosecution.

(4)In determining whether to grant leave to appeal the court must consider—

(a)whether there are arguable grounds of appeal, and

(b)what effect the finding has on the strength of the prosecutor's case.

107CAppeals under section 107A and 107B: general provisions

(1)In an appeal brought under section 107A or 107B the High Court may review not only the acquittal, direction or finding appealed against but also any direction, finding, decision, determination or ruling in the proceedings at first instance if it has a bearing on the acquittal, direction or finding appealed against.

(2)The test to be applied by the High Court in reviewing the acquittal, direction or finding appealed against is whether it was wrong in law.

107DExpedited appeals

(1)Subsection (2) applies where—

(a)the prosecutor intimates intention to appeal under section 107A or leave to appeal is granted by the court under section 107B, and

(b)the court is able to obtain confirmation from the Keeper of the Rolls that it would be practicable for the appeal to be heard and determined during an adjournment of the trial diet.

(2)The court must inform both parties of that fact and, after hearing them, must decide whether or not the appeal is to be heard and determined during such an adjournment.

(3)An appeal brought under section 107A or 107B which is heard and determined during such an adjournment is referred to in this Act as an “expedited appeal”.

(4)If the court decides that the appeal is to be an expedited appeal the court must, pending the outcome of the appeal—

(a)adjourn the trial diet, and

(b)where the appeal is against an acquittal, suspend the effect of the acquittal.

(5)Where the court cannot obtain from the Keeper of the Rolls confirmation of the kind mentioned in subsection (1)(b), the court must inform the parties of that fact.

(6)Where the High Court in an expedited appeal determines that an acquittal of an offence libelled in the indictment was wrong in law it must quash the acquittal and direct that the trial is to proceed in respect of the offence.

107EOther appeals under section 107A: appeal against acquittal

(1)This section applies where—

(a)an appeal brought under section 107A is not an expedited appeal,

(b)the appeal is against an acquittal, and

(c)the High Court determines that the acquittal was wrong in law.

(2)The court must quash the acquittal.

(3)If the prosecutor seeks leave to bring a new prosecution charging the accused with the same offence as that libelled in the indictment, or a similar offence arising out of the same facts as the offence libelled in the indictment, the High Court must grant the prosecutor authority to do so in accordance with section 119, unless the court considers that it would be contrary to the interests of justice to do so.

(4)If—

(a)no motion is made under subsection (3), or

(b)the High Court does not grant a motion made under that subsection,

the High Court must in disposing of the appeal acquit the accused of the offence libelled in the indictment.

107FOther appeals under section 107A or 107B: appeal against directions etc.

(1)This section applies where—

(a)an appeal brought under section 107A or 107B is not an expedited appeal, and

(b)the appeal is not against an acquittal.

(2)The court of first instance must desert the diet pro loco et tempore in relation to any offence to which the appeal relates.

(3)The trial is to proceed only if another offence of which the accused has not been acquitted and to which the appeal does not relate is libelled in the indictment.

(4)However, if the prosecutor moves for the diet to be deserted pro loco et tempore in relation to such other offence, the court must grant the motion.

(5)If the prosecutor seeks leave to bring a new prosecution charging the accused with the same offence as that libelled in the indictment, or a similar offence arising out of the same facts as the offence libelled in the indictment, the High Court must grant the prosecutor authority to do so in accordance with section 119, unless the court considers that it would be contrary to the interests of justice to do so..

75Power of High Court in appeal under section 107A of 1995 ActS

In section 104(1) of the 1995 Act (which makes provision as regards the power of the High Court in appeals under section 106(1) or 108 of that Act), after “106(1)” insert “ , 107A, 107B ”.

76Further amendment of 1995 ActS

(1)In section 110(1) of the 1995 Act (note of appeal), after paragraph (b), add—

(c)where the prosecutor intimates intention to appeal under section 107A(1), within 7 days after the acquittal or direction appealed against, the prosecutor may, except in the case of an expedited appeal, lodge such a note with the Clerk of Justiciary, who must send a copy to the judge and to the accused or to the accused's solicitor,

(d)within 7 days after leave to appeal under section 107B(1) is granted, the prosecutor may, except in the case of an expedited appeal, lodge such a note with the Clerk of Justiciary, who must send a copy to the judge and to the accused or to the accused's solicitor,

(e)in the case of an expedited appeal, as soon as practicable after the decision as to hearing and determining the case is made under section 107D(2), the prosecutor may—

(i)lodge such a note with the Clerk of Justiciary, and

(ii)provide a copy to the judge and to the accused or to the accused's solicitor..

(2)In section 113(1) of that Act (judge's report), after “under” insert “ any of paragraphs (a) to (d) of ”.

(3)After section 113 of that Act insert—

113AJudge's observations in expedited appeal

(1)On receiving a note of appeal given under section 110(1)(e), the judge who presided at the trial may give the Clerk of Justiciary any written observations that the judge thinks fit on—

(a)the case generally,

(b)the grounds contained in the note of appeal.

(2)The High Court may hear and determine the appeal without any such written observations.

(3)If written observations are given under subsection (1), the Clerk of Justiciary must give a copy of them to—

(a)the accused or the accused's solicitor, and

(b)the prosecutor.

(4)The written observations of the judge are available only to—

(a)the High Court,

(b)the parties, and

(c)any other person or classes of person prescribed by Act of Adjournal, in accordance with any conditions prescribed by Act of Adjournal..

(4)In section 119 of that Act (provision where High Court authorises new prosecution)—

(a)in each of subsections (1) and (10), after “118(1)(c)” insert “ or 107E(3) or 107F(5) ”,

(b)for subsection (2), substitute—

(2)In a new prosecution under this section—

(a)where authority for the prosecution is granted under section 118(1)(c), the accused must not be charged with an offence more serious than that of which the accused was convicted in the earlier proceedings,

(b)where authority for the prosecution is granted under section 107E(3), the accused must not be charged with an offence more serious than that of which the accused was acquitted in the earlier proceedings,

(c)where authority for the prosecution is granted under section 107F(5), the accused must not be charged with an offence more serious than that originally libelled in the indictment in the earlier proceedings.,

(c)after subsection (2) insert—

(2A)In a new prosecution under this section brought by virtue of section 107F(5), the circumstances set out in the indictment are not to be inconsistent with any direction given under section 97B(2)(b) or 97C(2) in the proceedings which gave rise to the appeal in question unless the High Court, in disposing of that appeal, determined that the direction was wrong in law., and

(d)in subsection (9), after “setting aside the verdict” insert “ or under section 107E(3) or 107F(5) granting authority to bring a new prosecution ”.

Retention and use of samples etc.S

77Retention of samples etc.S

(1)The 1995 Act is amended as follows.

(2)In section 18 (prints, samples etc. in criminal investigations)—

(a)in subsection (3), for “section 18A” substitute “ sections 18A to 18F ”,

(b)in subsection (7A), for “sections 19 to 20” substitute “ , subject to the modification in subsection (7AA), sections 18A to 19C ”, and

(c)after subsection (7A) insert—

(7AA)The modification is that for the purposes of section 19C as it applies in relation to relevant physical data taken from or provided by a person outwith Scotland, subsection (7A) is to be read as if in paragraph (d) the words from “created” to the end were omitted..

(3)In section 18A (retention of samples)—

(a)for subsection (1) substitute—

(1)This section applies to—

(a)relevant physical data taken or provided under section 18(2), and

(b)any sample, or any information derived from a sample, taken under section 18(6) or (6A),

where the condition in subsection (2) is satisfied.,

(b)in subsection (2), after “whom” insert “ the relevant physical data was taken or by whom it was provided or, as the case may be, from whom ”,

(c)in subsection (3), for “sample or information” substitute “ relevant physical data, sample or information derived from a sample ”,

(d)after subsection (8) insert—

(8A)If the sheriff principal allows an appeal against the refusal of an application under subsection (5), the sheriff principal may make an order amending, or further amending, the destruction date.

(8B)An order under subsection (8A) must not specify a destruction date more than 2 years later than the previous destruction date.,

(e)in subsection (10), for “sample or information” substitute “ relevant physical data, sample or information derived from a sample ”,

(f)in subsection (11)—

(i)in paragraph (a) of the definition of “the relevant chief constable”, after “who” insert “ took the relevant physical data or to whom it was provided or who ”, and

(ii)in the definition of “relevant sexual offence” and “relevant violent offence”, after “have” insert “ , subject to the modification in subsection (12), ”, and

(g)after subsection (11) insert—

(12)The modification is that the definition of “relevant sexual offence” in section 19A(6) is to be read as if for paragraph (g) there were substituted—

(g)public indecency if it is apparent from the offence as charged in the indictment or complaint that there was a sexual aspect to the behaviour of the person charged;.

78Retention of samples etc. where offer under sections 302 to 303ZA of 1995 Act acceptedS

After section 18A of the 1995 Act insert—

18BRetention of samples etc. where offer under sections 302 to 303ZA accepted

(1)This section applies to—

(a)relevant physical data taken from or provided by a person under section 18(2), and

(b)any sample, or any information derived from a sample, taken from a person under section 18(6) or (6A),

where the conditions in subsection (2) are satisfied.

(2)The conditions are—

(a)the relevant physical data or sample was taken from or provided by the person while the person was under arrest or being detained in connection with the offence or offences in relation to which a relevant offer is issued to the person, and

(b)the person—

(i)accepts a relevant offer, or

(ii)in the case of a relevant offer other than one of the type mentioned in paragraph (d) of subsection (3), is deemed to accept a relevant offer.

(3)In this section “relevant offer” means—

(a)a conditional offer under section 302,

(b)a compensation offer under section 302A,

(c)a combined offer under section 302B, or

(d)a work offer under section 303ZA.

(4)Subject to subsections (6) and (7) and section 18C(9) and (10), the relevant physical data, sample or information derived from a sample must be destroyed no later than the destruction date.

(5)In subsection (4), “destruction date” means—

(a)in relation to a relevant offer that relates only to—

(i)a relevant sexual offence,

(ii)a relevant violent offence, or

(iii)both a relevant sexual offence and a relevant violent offence, the date of expiry of the period of 3 years beginning with the date on which the relevant offer is issued or such later date as an order under section 18C(2) or (6) may specify,

(b)in relation to a relevant offer that relates to—

(i)an offence or offences falling within paragraph (a), and

(ii)any other offence,

the date of expiry of the period of 3 years beginning with the date on which the relevant offer is issued or such later date as an order under section 18C(2) or (6) may specify,

(c)in relation to a relevant offer that does not relate to an offence falling within paragraph (a), the date of expiry of the period of 2 years beginning with the date on which the relevant offer is issued.

(6)If a relevant offer is recalled by virtue of section 302C(5) or a decision to uphold it is quashed under section 302C(7)(a), all record of the relevant physical data, sample and information derived from a sample must be destroyed as soon as possible after—

(a)the prosecutor decides not to issue a further relevant offer to the person,

(b)the prosecutor decides not to institute criminal proceedings against the person, or

(c)the prosecutor institutes criminal proceedings against the person and those proceedings conclude otherwise than with a conviction or an order under section 246(3).

(7)If a relevant offer is set aside by virtue of section 303ZB, all record of the relevant physical data, sample and information derived from a sample must be destroyed as soon as possible after the setting aside.

(8)In this section, “relevant sexual offence” and “relevant violent offence” have, subject to the modification in subsection (9), the same meanings as in section 19A(6) and include any attempt, conspiracy or incitement to commit such an offence.

(9)The modification is that the definition of “relevant sexual offence” in section 19A(6) is to be read as if for paragraph (g) there were substituted—

(g)public indecency if it is apparent from the relevant offer (as defined in section 18B(3)) relating to the offence that there was a sexual aspect to the behaviour of the person to whom the relevant offer is issued;.

18CSection 18B: extension of retention period where relevant offer relates to certain sexual or violent offences

(1)This section applies where the destruction date for relevant physical data, a sample or information derived from a sample falls within section 18B(5)(a) or (b).

(2)On a summary application made by the relevant chief constable within the period of 3 months before the destruction date, the sheriff may, if satisfied that there are reasonable grounds for doing so, make an order amending, or further amending, the destruction date.

(3)An application under subsection (2) may be made to any sheriff—

(a)in whose sheriffdom the appropriate person resides,

(b)in whose sheriffdom that person is believed by the applicant to be, or

(c)to whose sheriffdom the person is believed by the applicant to be intending to come.

(4)An order under subsection (2) must not specify a destruction date more than 2 years later than the previous destruction date.

(5)The decision of the sheriff on an application under subsection (2) may be appealed to the sheriff principal within 21 days of the decision.

(6)If the sheriff principal allows an appeal against the refusal of an application under subsection (2), the sheriff principal may make an order amending, or further amending, the destruction date.

(7)An order under subsection (6) must not specify a destruction date more than 2 years later than the previous destruction date.

(8)The sheriff principal's decision on an appeal under subsection (5) is final.

(9)Section 18B(4) does not apply where—

(a)an application under subsection (2) has been made but has not been determined,

(b)the period within which an appeal may be brought under subsection (5) against a decision to refuse an application has not elapsed, or

(c)such an appeal has been brought but has not been withdrawn or finally determined.

(10)Where—

(a)the period within which an appeal referred to in subsection (9)(b) may be brought has elapsed without such an appeal being brought,

(b)such an appeal is brought and is withdrawn or finally determined against the appellant, or

(c)an appeal brought under subsection (5) against a decision to grant an application is determined in favour of the appellant,

the relevant physical data, sample or information derived from a sample must be destroyed as soon as possible after the period has elapsed, or, as the case may be, the appeal is withdrawn or determined.

(11)In this section—

  • appropriate person” means the person from whom the relevant physical data was taken or by whom it was provided or from whom the sample was taken,

  • destruction date” has the meaning given by section 18B(5),

  • the relevant chief constable” has the same meaning as in subsection (11) of section 18A, with the modification that references to the person referred to in subsection (2) of that section are references to the appropriate person..

79Retention of samples etc. taken or provided in connection with certain fixed penalty offencesS

After section 18C of the 1995 Act insert—

18DRetention of samples etc. taken or provided in connection with certain fixed penalty offences

(1)This section applies to—

(a)relevant physical data taken from or provided by a person under section 18(2), and

(b)any sample, or any information derived from a sample, taken from a person under section 18(6) or (6A),

where the conditions in subsection (2) are satisfied.

(2)The conditions are—

(a)the person was arrested or detained in connection with a fixed penalty offence,

(b)the relevant physical data or sample was taken from or provided by the person while the person was under arrest or being detained in connection with that offence,

(c)after the relevant physical data or sample was taken from or provided by the person, a constable gave the person under section 129(1) of the 2004 Act—

(i)a fixed penalty notice in respect of that offence (the “main FPN”), or

(ii)the main FPN and one or more other fixed penalty notices in respect of fixed penalty offences arising out of the same circumstances as the offence to which the main FPN relates, and

(d)the person, in relation to the main FPN and any other fixed penalty notice of the type mentioned in paragraph (c)(ii)—

(i)pays the fixed penalty, or

(ii)pays any sum that the person is liable to pay by virtue of section 131(5) of the 2004 Act.

(3)Subject to subsections (4) and (5), the relevant physical data, sample or information derived from a sample must be destroyed before the end of the period of 2 years beginning with—

(a)where subsection (2)(c)(i) applies, the day on which the main FPN is given to the person,

(b)where subsection (2)(c)(ii) applies and—

(i)the main FPN and any other fixed penalty notice are given to the person on the same day, that day,

(ii)the main FPN and any other fixed penalty notice are given to the person on different days, the later day.

(4)Where—

(a)subsection (2)(c)(i) applies, and

(b)the main FPN is revoked under section 133(1) of the 2004 Act,

the relevant physical data, sample or information derived from a sample must be destroyed as soon as possible after the revocation.

(5)Where—

(a)subsection (2)(c)(ii) applies, and

(b)the main FPN and any other fixed penalty notices are revoked under section 133(1) of the 2004 Act,

the relevant physical data, sample or information derived from a sample must be destroyed as soon as possible after the revocations.

(6)In this section—

  • the 2004 Act” means the Antisocial Behaviour etc. (Scotland) Act 2004 (asp 8),

  • fixed penalty notice” has the meaning given by section 129(2) of the 2004 Act,

  • fixed penalty offence” has the meaning given by section 128(1) of the 2004 Act..

80Retention of samples etc. from children referred to children's hearingsS

After section 18D of the 1995 Act insert—

18ERetention of samples etc.: children referred to children's hearings

(1)This section applies to—

(a)relevant physical data taken from or provided by a child under section 18(2); and

(b)any sample, or any information derived from a sample, taken from a child under section 18(6) or (6A),

where the first condition, and the second, third or fourth condition, are satisfied.

(2)The first condition is that the child's case has been referred to a children's hearing under section 65(1) of the Children (Scotland) Act 1995 (c.36) (the “Children Act”).

(3)The second condition is that—

(a)a ground of the referral is that the child has committed an offence mentioned in subsection (6) (a “relevant offence”);

(b)both the child and the relevant person in relation to the child accept, under section 65(5) or (6) of the Children Act, the ground of referral; and

(c)no application to the sheriff under section 65(7) or (9) of that Act is made in relation to that ground.

(4)The third condition is that—

(a)a ground of the referral is that the child has committed a relevant offence;

(b)the sheriff, on an application under section 65(7) or (9) of the Children Act—

(i)deems, under section 68(8) of the Children Act; or

(ii)finds, under section 68(10) of that Act,

the ground of referral to be established; and

(c)no application to the sheriff under section 85(1) of that Act is made in relation to that ground.

(5)The fourth condition is that the sheriff, on an application under section 85(1) of the Children Act—

(a)is satisfied, under section 85(6)(b) of that Act, that a ground of referral which constitutes a relevant offence is established; or

(b)finds, under section 85(7)(b) of that Act, that—

(i)a ground of referral, which was not stated in the original application under section 65(7) or (9) of that Act, is established; and

(ii)that ground constitutes a relevant offence.

(6)A relevant offence is such relevant sexual offence or relevant violent offence as the Scottish Ministers may by order made by statutory instrument prescribe.

(7)An order under subsection (6) may prescribe a relevant violent offence by reference to a particular degree of seriousness.

(8)Subject to section 18F(8) and (9), the relevant physical data, sample or information derived from a sample must be destroyed no later than the destruction date.

(9)The destruction date is—

(a)the date of expiry of the period of 3 years following—

(i)where the second condition is satisfied, the date on which the ground of referral was accepted as mentioned in that condition;

(ii)where the third condition is satisfied, the date on which the ground of referral was established as mentioned in that condition;

(iii)where the ground of referral is established as mentioned in paragraph (a) of the fourth condition, the date on which that ground was established under section 68(8) or, as the case may be, (10) of the Children Act; or

(iv)where the ground of referral is established as mentioned in paragraph (b) of the fourth condition, the date on which that ground was established as mentioned in that paragraph; or

(b)such later date as an order under section 18F(1) may specify.

(10)No statutory instrument containing an order under subsection (6) may be made unless a draft of the instrument has been laid before, and approved by resolution of, the Scottish Parliament.

(11)In this section—

  • relevant person” has the same meaning as in section 93(2) of the Children Act;

  • “relevant sexual offence” and “relevant violent offence” have, subject to the modification in subsection (12), the same meanings as in section 19A(6) and include any attempt, conspiracy or incitement to commit such an offence.

(12)The modification is that the definition of “relevant sexual offence” in section 19A(6) is to be read as if for paragraph (g) there were substituted—“(g)public indecency if it is apparent from the ground of referral relating to the offence that there was a sexual aspect to the behaviour of the child;”.

18FRetention of samples etc. relating to children: appeals

(1)On a summary application made by the relevant chief constable within the period of 3 months before the destruction date the sheriff may, if satisfied that there are reasonable grounds for doing so, make an order amending, or further amending, the destruction date.

(2)An application under subsection (1) may be made to any sheriff—

(a)in whose sheriffdom the child mentioned in section 18E(1) resides;

(b)in whose sheriffdom that child is believed by the applicant to be; or

(c)to whose sheriffdom that child is believed by the applicant to be intending to come.

(3)An order under subsection (1) must not specify a destruction date more than 2 years later than the previous destruction date.

(4)The decision of the sheriff on an application under subsection (1) may be appealed to the sheriff principal within 21 days of the decision.

(5)If the sheriff principal allows an appeal against the refusal of an application under subsection (1), the sheriff principal may make an order amending, or further amending, the destruction date.

(6)An order under subsection (5) must not specify a destruction date more than 2 years later than the previous destruction date.

(7)The sheriff principal's decision on an appeal under subsection (4) is final.

(8)Section 18E(8) does not apply where—

(a)an application under subsection (1) has been made but has not been determined;

(b)the period within which an appeal may be brought under subsection (4) against a decision to refuse an application has not elapsed; or

(c)such an appeal has been brought but has not been withdrawn or finally determined.

(9)Where—

(a)the period within which an appeal referred to in subsection (8)(b) may be brought has elapsed without such an appeal being brought;

(b)such an appeal is brought and is withdrawn or finally determined against the appellant; or

(c)an appeal brought under subsection (4) against a decision to grant an application is determined in favour of the appellant,

the relevant physical data, sample or information derived from a sample must be destroyed as soon as possible after the period has elapsed or, as the case may be, the appeal is withdrawn or determined.

(10)In this section—

  • destruction date” has the meaning given by section 18E(9); and

  • relevant chief constable” has the same meaning as in subsection (11) of section 18A, with the modification that references to the person referred to in subsection (2) of that section are references to the child referred to in section 18E(1)..

81Extension of section 19A of 1995 ActS

In section 19A(6) of the 1995 Act (definitions of certain expressions for purposes of section 19A)—

(a)in the definition of “relevant sexual offence”, for paragraph (g) substitute—

(g)public indecency if the court, in imposing sentence or otherwise disposing of the case, determined for the purposes of paragraph 60 of Schedule 3 to the Sexual Offences Act 2003 (c.42) that there was a significant sexual aspect to the offender's behaviour in committing the offence;, and

(b)in paragraph (h) of the definition of “relevant violent offence”, after sub-paragraph (iv), insert—

(v)section 47(1) (possession of offensive weapon in public place), 49(1) (possession of article with blade or point in public place), 49A(1) or (2) (possession of article with blade or point or offensive weapon on school premises) or 49C(1) (possession of offensive weapon or article with blade or point in prison) of the Criminal Law (Consolidation) (Scotland) Act 1995 (c.39);.

82Use of samples etc.S

(1)After section 19B of the 1995 Act insert—

19CSections 18 and 19 to 19AA: use of samples etc.

(1)Subsection (2) applies to—

(a)relevant physical data taken or provided under section 18(2), 19(2)(a), 19A(2)(a) or 19AA(3)(a),

(b)a sample, or any information derived from a sample, taken under section 18(6) or (6A), 19(2)(b) or (c), 19A(2)(b) or (c) or 19AA(3)(b) or (c),

(c)relevant physical data or a sample taken from a person—

(i)by virtue of any power of search,

(ii)by virtue of any power to take possession of evidence where there is immediate danger of its being lost or destroyed, or

(iii)under the authority of a warrant,

(d)information derived from a sample falling within paragraph (c), and

(e)relevant physical data, a sample or information derived from a sample taken from, or provided by, a person outwith Scotland which is given by any person to—

(i)a police force,

(ii)the Scottish Police Services Authority, or

(iii)a person acting on behalf of a police force.

(2)The relevant physical data, sample or information derived from a sample may be used—

(a)for the prevention or detection of crime, the investigation of an offence or the conduct of a prosecution, or

(b)for the identification of a deceased person or a person from whom the relevant physical data or sample came.

(3)Subsections (4) and (5) apply to relevant physical data, a sample or information derived from a sample falling within any of paragraphs (a) to (d) of subsection (1) (“relevant material”).

(4)If the relevant material is held by a police force, the Scottish Police Services Authority or a person acting on behalf of a police force, the police force or, as the case may be, the Authority or person may give the relevant material to another person for use by that person in accordance with subsection (2).

(5)A police force, the Scottish Police Services Authority or a person acting on behalf of a police force may, in using the relevant material in accordance with subsection (2), check it against other relevant physical data, samples and information derived from samples received from another person.

(6)In subsection (2)—

(a)the reference to crime includes a reference to—

(i)conduct which constitutes a criminal offence or two or more criminal offences (whether under the law of a part of the United Kingdom or a country or territory outside the United Kingdom), or

(ii)conduct which is, or corresponds to, conduct which, if it all took place in any one part of the United Kingdom would constitute a criminal offence or two or more criminal offences,

(b)the reference to an investigation includes a reference to an investigation outside Scotland of a crime or suspected crime, and

(c)the reference to a prosecution includes a reference to a prosecution brought in respect of a crime in a country or territory outside Scotland.

(7)This section is without prejudice to any other power relating to the use of relevant physical data, samples or information derived from a sample..

(2)In section 56 of the Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act 2003 (asp 7) (use of samples etc. voluntarily given)—

(a)in subsection (1), after “from,” insert “ or provided by ”,

(b)in subsection (2), for the words from “may” where it first occurs to the end substitute , or information derived from that sample may be held and used—

(a)for the prevention or detection of crime, the investigation of an offence or the conduct of a prosecution, or

(b)for the identification of a deceased person or a person from whom the sample or relevant physical data came.,

(c)in subsection (3), after “information” insert “ derived from a sample ”,

(d)in subsection (5)(b), the words “with all information derived from them” are repealed,

(e)in subsection (6)(a), for “it or them” substitute “ the sample ”,

(f)in subsection (7)(a), the words “or relevant physical data”, in the second place where they occur, are repealed, and

(g)after subsection (7) insert—

(7A)In subsection (2)—

(a)the reference to crime includes a reference to—

(i)conduct which constitutes a criminal offence or two or more criminal offences (whether under the law of a part of the United Kingdom or a country or territory outside the United Kingdom), or

(ii)conduct which is, or corresponds to, conduct which, if it all took place in any one part of the United Kingdom would constitute a criminal offence or two or more criminal offences,

(b)the reference to an investigation includes a reference to an investigation outside the United Kingdom of a crime or suspected crime, and

(c)the reference to a prosecution includes a reference to a prosecution brought in respect of a crime in a country or territory outside the United Kingdom..

Referrals from the Scottish Criminal Cases Review CommissionS

83Referrals from Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission: grounds for appealS

In section 194D of the 1995 Act (further provisions as to references to the High Court by the Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission), after subsection (4) insert—

(4A)The grounds for an appeal arising from a reference to the High Court under section 194B of this Act must relate to one or more of the reasons for making the reference contained in the Commission's statement of reasons.

(4B)Despite subsection (4A), the High Court may, if it considers it is in the interests of justice to do so, grant leave for the appellant to found the appeal on additional grounds.

(4C)An application by the appellant for leave under subsection (4B) must be made and intimated to the Crown Agent within 21 days after the date on which a copy of the Commission's statement of reasons is sent under subsection (4)(b).

(4D)The High Court may, on cause shown, extend the period of 21 days mentioned in subsection (4C).

(4E)The Clerk of Justiciary must intimate to the persons mentioned in subsection (4F)—

(a)a decision under subsection (4B), and

(b)in the case of a refusal to grant leave for the appeal to be founded on additional grounds, the reasons for the decision.

(4F)Those persons are—

(a)the appellant or the appellant's solicitor, and

(b)the Crown Agent..

PART 4 SEVIDENCE

84Admissibility of prior statements of witnesses: abolition of competence testS

(1)This section applies in relation to a prior statement made by a witness before the commencement of section 24 of the Vulnerable Witnesses (Scotland) Act 2004 (asp 3) (“the 2004 Act”) (which abolishes the competence test for witnesses in criminal and civil proceedings).

(2)For the purpose of the application of subsection (2)(c) of section 260 of the 1995 Act (admissibility of prior statement depends on competence of the witness at the time of the statement) in relation to the statement, section 24 of the 2004 Act is taken to have been in force at the time the statement was made.

(3)In this section, “prior statement” has the meaning it has in section 260 of the 1995 Act.

85Witness statements: use during trialS

(1)The 1995 Act is amended as follows.

(2)After section 261 insert—

Witness statementsS

261AWitness statements: use during trial

(1)Subsection (2) applies where—

(a)a witness is giving evidence in criminal proceedings,

(b)the witness has made a prior statement,

(c)the prosecutor has seen or has been given an opportunity to see the statement, and

(d)the accused (or a solicitor or advocate acting on behalf of the accused in the proceedings) has seen or has been given an opportunity to see the statement.

(2)The court may allow the witness to refer to the statement while the witness is giving evidence..

(3)In section 262 (construction of sections 259 to 261 of Act)—

(a)in the title, for “261” substitute “ 261A ”,

(b)in each of subsections (1) to (4), for “261” substitute “ 261A ”, and

(c)in subsection (3)—

(i)in the definition of “criminal proceedings”, after “include” insert “ (other than in section 261A) ”, and

(ii)in the definition of “made”, after “includes” insert “ (other than in section 261A) ”.

86Spouse or civil partner of accused a compellable witnessS

(1)For section 264 of the 1995 Act (spouse of accused a competent witness) substitute—

264Spouse or civil partner of accused a compellable witness

(1)The spouse or civil partner of an accused is a competent and compellable witness for the prosecution, the accused or any co-accused in the proceedings against the accused.

(2)Subsection (1) is, if the spouse or civil partner is a co-accused in the proceedings, subject to any enactment or rule of law by virtue of which an accused need not (by reason of being an accused) give evidence in the proceedings.

(3)Subsection (1) displaces any other rule of law that would (but for that subsection) prevent or restrict, by reference to the relationship, the giving of evidence by the spouse or civil partner of an accused..

(2)Section 130 of the Civil Partnership Act 2004 (c.33) (civil partner of accused a competent witness) is repealed.

87Special measures for child witnesses and other vulnerable witnessesS

(1)The 1995 Act is amended as follows.

(2)In section 271 (vulnerable witnesses: main definitions)—

(a)in subsection (1)—

(i)for “a trial” substitute “ a hearing in relevant criminal proceedings ”, and

(ii)for “the trial”, wherever it occurs, substitute “ the hearing ”, and

(b)in subsection (5)—

(i)the definition of “trial” is repealed, and

(ii)after the definition of “court” insert—

hearing in relevant criminal proceedings” means any hearing in the course of any criminal proceedings in the High Court or the sheriff court..

(3)In section 271A (child witnesses)—

(a)in subsection (1), for “a trial” substitute “ a hearing in relevant criminal proceedings ”,

(b)in subsection (5A)(c), for “the trial diet” substitute “ the hearing at which the evidence is to be given ”,

(c)in subsection (6)(a), for “the trial” substitute “ a hearing in relevant criminal proceedings ”,

(d)in subsection (7)(b)(ii), for “the trial” substitute “ the hearing at which the evidence is to be given ”,

(e)in subsection (8), for “the trial diet” substitute “ the hearing at which the evidence is to be given ”,

(f)in subsection (10)(b)(i), for “the trial diet” substitute “ the hearing at which the evidence is to be given ”,

(g)in subsection (12), for “the trial diet in the case” substitute “ the hearing at which the evidence is to be given ”, and

(h)in subsection (13A)(c), for “the trial diet” substitute “ the hearing at which the evidence is to be given ”.

(4)In section 271B (further special provision for child witnesses under the age of 12)—

(a)in subsection (1)(a), for “a trial” substitute “ a hearing in relevant criminal proceedings ”,

(b)in subsection (1)(b), for “the trial” substitute “ the hearing ”, and

(c)in subsection (3)(b)(i), for “the trial” substitute “ the hearing ”.

(5)In section 271C (vulnerable witnesses other than child witnesses)—

(a)in subsection (1), for “a trial” substitute “ a hearing in relevant criminal proceedings ”,

(b)in subsection (5A)(c), for “the trial diet” substitute “ the hearing at which the evidence is to be given ”,

(c)in subsection (6), for “the trial diet” substitute “ the hearing at which the evidence is to be given ”,

(d)in subsection (10), for “the trial diet in the case” substitute “ the hearing at which the evidence is to be given ”, and

(e)in subsection (12)(c), for “the trial diet” substitute “ the hearing at which the evidence is to be given ”.

(6)In section 271D (review of arrangements for vulnerable witnesses)—

(a)in subsection (1)—

(i)for “the trial”, where it first occurs, substitute “ a hearing in relevant criminal proceedings ”, and

(ii)for “the trial”, where it second occurs, substitute “ the hearing ”, and

(b)in subsection (4)(b)(i), for “the trial” substitute “ the hearing ”.

(7)In section 271F (the accused)—

(a)in subsection (1)—

(i)for “the trial”, where it first occurs, substitute “ a hearing in relevant criminal proceedings ”, and

(ii)for “the trial”, where it second occurs (in subsection (1)(a)), substitute “ the hearing ”,

(b)in subsection (2)—

(i)for “the trial”, where it first occurs, substitute “ the hearing ”,

(ii)for “the trial”, where it second occurs (in subsection (2)(a)(iii)), substitute “ a hearing in relevant criminal proceedings ”, and

(iii)for “the trial”, where it third occurs (in subsection (2)(b)(i)), substitute “ a hearing in relevant criminal proceedings ”,

(c)in subsection (3), for “the trial” substitute “ a hearing in relevant criminal proceedings ”, and

(d)in subsection (5), for “the trial” substitute “ the hearing ”.

(8)In section 271J (live television link)—

(a)in subsection (1), for “the trial” substitute “ the hearing ”,

(b)in subsection (2)(b), for “the trial” substitute “ the hearing ”, and

(c)in subsection (5)(a), for “the trial” substitute “ the hearing ”.

(9)In section 271L (supporters), in subsection (2), for “the trial” substitute “ that or any other hearing in the proceedings ”.

(10)In section 288E (prohibition of personal conduct of defence in certain cases involving child witnesses under the age of 12), in subsection (5), for “a child witness referred to in subsection (2)(b) above” substitute “ the trial ”.

88Child witnesses in proceedings for people trafficking offencesS

In section 271 of the 1995 Act (vulnerable witnesses: main definitions)—

(a)in subsection (1)(a), for “age of 16” substitute “ relevant age ”, and

(b)after subsection (1), insert—

(1A)In subsection (1)(a), “the relevant age” means—

(a)in the case of a person who is giving or is to give evidence in proceedings for an offence under section 22 of the Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act 2003 (asp 7) (trafficking in prostitution etc.) or section 4 of the Asylum and Immigration (Treatment of Claimants, etc.) Act 2004 (c.19) (trafficking people for exploitation), the age of 18, and

(b)in any other case, the age of 16..

89Amendment of Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act 2003S

Section 15A of the Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act 2003 (asp 7) (application of certain vulnerable witness provisions in proofs) is repealed.

90Witness anonymity ordersS

(1)After section 271M of the 1995 Act insert—

Witness anonymity ordersS

271NWitness anonymity orders

(1)A court may make an order requiring such specified measures to be taken in relation to a witness in criminal proceedings as the court considers appropriate to ensure that the identity of the witness is not disclosed in or in connection with the proceedings.

(2)The court may make such an order only on an application made in accordance with sections 271P and 271Q, if satisfied of the conditions set out in section 271R having considered the matters set out in section 271S.

(3)The kinds of measures that may be required to be taken in relation to a witness include in particular measures for securing one or more of the matters mentioned in subsection (4).

(4)Those matters are—

(a)that the witness's name and other identifying details may be—

(i)withheld,

(ii)removed from materials disclosed to any party to the proceedings,

(b)that the witness may use a pseudonym,

(c)that the witness is not asked questions of any specified description that might lead to the identification of the witness,

(d)that the witness is screened to any specified extent,

(e)that the witness's voice is subjected to modulation to any specified extent.

(5)Nothing in this section authorises the court to require—

(a)the witness to be screened to such an extent that the witness cannot be seen by the judge or the jury,

(b)the witness's voice to be modulated to such an extent that the witness's natural voice cannot be heard by the judge or the jury.

(6)An order made under this section is referred to in this Act as a “witness anonymity order”.

(7)In this section “specified” means specified in the order concerned.

271PApplications

(1)An application for a witness anonymity order to be made in relation to a witness in criminal proceedings may be made to the court by the prosecutor or the accused.

(2)Where an application is made by the prosecutor, the prosecutor—

(a)must (unless the court directs otherwise) inform the court of the identity of the witness, but

(b)is not required to disclose in connection with the application—

(i)the identity of the witness, or

(ii)any information that might enable the witness to be identified,

to any other party to the proceedings (or to the legal representatives of any other party to the proceedings).

(3)Where an application is made by the accused, the accused—

(a)must inform the court and the prosecutor of the identity of the witness, but

(b)if there is more than one accused, is not required to disclose in connection with the application—

(i)the identity of the witness, or

(ii)any information that might enable the witness to be identified,

to any other accused (or to the legal representatives of any other accused).

(4)Subsections (5) and (6) apply where the prosecutor or the accused proposes to make an application under this section in respect of a witness.

(5)Any relevant information which is disclosed by or on behalf of that party before the determination of the application must be disclosed in such a way as to prevent—

(a)the identity of the witness, or

(b)any information that might enable the witness to be identified,

from being disclosed except as required by subsection (2)(a) or (3)(a).

(6)Despite any provision in this Act to the contrary, any relevant list, application or notice lodged, made or given by that party before the determination of the application must not—

(a)disclose the identity of the witness, or

(b)contain any other information that might enable the witness to be identified,

but the list, application or notice must, instead, refer to the witness by a pseudonym.

(7)Relevant information” means any document or other material which falls to be disclosed, or is sought to be relied on, by or on behalf of the party concerned in connection with the proceedings or proceedings preliminary to them.

(8)Relevant list, application or notice” means—

(a)a list of witnesses,

(b)a list of productions,

(c)a notice under section 67(5) or 78(4) relating to the witness,

(d)a motion or application under section 268, 269 or 270 relating to the witness,

(e)any other motion, application or notice relating to the witness.

(9)The court must give every party to the proceedings the opportunity to be heard on an application under this section.

(10)Subsection (9) does not prevent the court from hearing one or more of the parties to the proceedings in the absence of an accused and the accused's legal representatives, if it appears to the court to be appropriate to do so in the circumstances of the case.

(11)Nothing in this section is to be taken as restricting any power to make rules of court.

271QMaking and determination of applications

(1)In proceedings on indictment, an application under section 271P is a preliminary issue (and sections 79 and 87A and other provisions relating to preliminary issues apply accordingly).

(2)No application under section 271P may be made in summary proceedings by any party unless notice of the party's intention to do so has been given—

(a)if an intermediate diet has been fixed, before that diet,

(b)if no intermediate diet has been fixed, before the commencement of the trial.

(3)Subsection (2) is subject to subsections (4) and (8).

(4)In summary proceedings in which an intermediate diet has been fixed, the court may, on cause shown, grant leave for an application under section 271P to be made without notice having been given in accordance with subsection (2)(a).

(5)Subsection (6) applies where—

(a)the court grants leave for a party to make an application under section 271P without notice having been given in accordance with subsection (2)(a), or

(b)notice of a party's intention to make such an application is given in accordance with subsection (2)(b).

(6)The application must be disposed of before the commencement of the trial.

(7)Subsection (8) applies where a motion or application is made under section 268, 269 or 270 to lead the evidence of a witness.

(8)Despite section 79(1) and subsection (2) above, an application under section 271P may be made in respect of the witness at the same time as the motion or application under section 268, 269 or 270 is made.

(9)The application must be determined by the court before continuing with the trial.

(10)Where an application is made under section 271P, the court may postpone or adjourn (or further adjourn) the trial diet.

(11)In this section, “commencement of the trial” means the time when the first witness for the prosecution is sworn.

271RConditions for making orders

(1)This section applies where an application is made for a witness anonymity order to be made in relation to a witness in criminal proceedings.

(2)The court may make the order only if it is satisfied that Conditions A to D below are met.

(3)Condition A is that the proposed order is necessary—

(a)in order to protect the safety of the witness or another person or to prevent any serious damage to property, or

(b)in order to prevent real harm to the public interest (whether affecting the carrying on of any activities in the public interest or the safety of a person involved in carrying on such activities or otherwise).

(4)Condition B is that, having regard to all the circumstances, the effect of the proposed order would be consistent with the accused's receiving a fair trial.

(5)Condition C is that the importance of the witness's testimony is such that in the interests of justice the witness ought to testify.

(6)Condition D is that—

(a)the witness would not testify if the proposed order were not made, or

(b)there would be real harm to the public interest if the witness were to testify without the proposed order being made.

(7)In determining whether the measures to be specified in the order are necessary for the purpose mentioned in subsection (3)(a), the court must have regard in particular to any reasonable fear on the part of the witness—

(a)that the witness or another person would suffer death or injury, or

(b)that there would be serious damage to property,

if the witness were to be identified.

271SRelevant considerations

(1)When deciding whether Conditions A to D in section 271R are met in the case of an application for a witness anonymity order, the court must have regard to—

(a)the considerations mentioned in subsection (2), and

(b)such other matters as the court considers relevant.

(2)The considerations are—

(a)the general right of an accused in criminal proceedings to know the identity of a witness in the proceedings,

(b)the extent to which the credibility of the witness concerned would be a relevant factor when the witness's evidence comes to be assessed,

(c)whether evidence given by the witness might be material in implicating the accused,

(d)whether the witness's evidence could be properly tested (whether on grounds of credibility or otherwise) without the witness's identity being disclosed,

(e)whether there is any reason to believe that the witness—

(i)has a tendency to be dishonest, or

(ii)has any motive to be dishonest in the circumstances of the case,

having regard in particular to any previous convictions of the witness and to any relationship between the witness and the accused or any associates of the accused,

(f)whether it would be reasonably practicable to protect the witness's identity by any means other than by making a witness anonymity order specifying the measures that are under consideration by the court.

271TDirection to jury

(1)Subsection (2) applies where, in a trial on indictment, any evidence has been given by a witness at a time when a witness anonymity order applied to the witness.

(2)The judge must give the jury such direction as the judge considers appropriate to ensure that the fact that the order was made in relation to the witness does not prejudice the accused.

271UDischarge and variation of order

(1)This section applies where a court has made a witness anonymity order in relation to any criminal proceedings.

(2)The court may discharge or vary (or further vary) the order if it appears to the court to be appropriate to do so in view of the provisions of sections 271R and 271S that applied to the making of the order.

(3)The court may do so—

(a)on an application made by a party to the proceedings if there has been a material change of circumstances since the relevant time, or

(b)on its own initiative.

(4)The court must give every party to the proceedings the opportunity to be heard—

(a)before determining an application made to it under subsection (3)(a), and

(b)before discharging or varying the order on its own initiative.

(5)Subsection (4) does not prevent the court from hearing one or more of the parties to the proceedings in the absence of an accused and the accused's legal representatives, if it appears to the court to be appropriate to do so in the circumstances of the case.

(6)In subsection (3)(a) “the relevant time” means—

(a)the time when the order was made, or

(b)if a previous application has been made under that subsection, the time when the application (or the last application) was made.

271VAppeals

(1)The prosecutor or the accused may appeal to the High Court against—

(a)the making of a witness anonymity order under section 271N,

(b)the kinds of measures that are required to be taken in relation to a witness under a witness anonymity order made under that section,

(c)the refusal to make a witness anonymity order under that section,

(d)the discharge of a witness anonymity order under section 271U,

(e)the variation of a witness anonymity order under that section, or

(f)the refusal to discharge or vary a witness anonymity order under that section.

(2)The appeal may be brought only with the leave of the court of first instance, granted—

(a)on the motion of the party making the appeal, or

(b)on its own initiative.

(3)The procedure in relation to the appeal is to be prescribed by Act of Adjournal.

(4)If an appeal is brought under this section—

(a)the period between the lodging of the appeal and its determination does not count towards any time limit applying in respect of the case,

(b)the court of first instance or the High Court may do either or both of the following—

(i)postpone or adjourn (or further adjourn) the trial diet,

(ii)extend any time limit applying in respect of the case.

(5)An appeal under this section does not affect any right of appeal in relation to any other decision of any court in the criminal proceedings.

271WAppeal against the making of a witness anonymity order

(1)This section applies where—

(a)an appeal is brought under section 271V(1)(a) against the making of a witness anonymity order, and

(b)the High Court determines that the decision of the judge at first instance was wrong in law.

(2)The High Court must discharge the order and the trial is to proceed as if the order had not been made.

271XAppeal against the refusal to make a witness anonymity order

(1)This section applies where—

(a)an appeal is brought under section 271V(1)(c) against the refusal to make a witness anonymity order in relation to a witness in criminal proceedings, and

(b)the High Court determines that the decision of the judge at first instance was wrong in law.

(2)The High Court must make an order requiring such specified measures to be taken in relation to the witness in the proceedings as the court considers appropriate to ensure that the identity of the witness is not disclosed in or in connection with the proceedings.

271YAppeal against a variation of a witness anonymity order

(1)This section applies where—

(a)an appeal is brought under section 271V(1)(e) against a variation of a witness anonymity order, and

(b)the High Court determines that the decision of the judge at first instance was wrong in law.

(2)The High Court must discharge the variation.

(3)If the High Court determines that it is appropriate to make an additional variation in view of the provisions of sections 271R and 271S, the court may do so.

271ZAppeal against a refusal to vary or discharge a witness anonymity order

(1)This section applies where—

(a)an appeal is brought under section 271V(1)(f) against a refusal to discharge or vary a witness anonymity order, and

(b)the High Court determines that the decision of the judge at first instance was wrong in law.

(2)The High Court must discharge the order, or make the variation, as the case requires.

(3)If, in the case of a variation, the High Court determines that it is appropriate to make an additional variation in view of the provisions of sections 271R and 271S, the court may do so..

(2)The 1995 Act is amended as follows—

(a)in section 79 (preliminary pleas and preliminary issues)—

(i)after subsection (1), insert—

(1A)Subsection (1) is subject to section 271Q(8)., and

(ii)in subsection (2)(b), after sub-paragraph (ii), insert—

(iia)an application for a witness anonymity order under section 271P of this Act;, and

(b)in section 148 (intermediate diets), after subsection (3), insert—

(3AA)At an intermediate diet, the court shall also dispose of any application for a witness anonymity order under section 271P of this Act of which notice has been given in accordance with section 271Q(2)(a) of this Act..

(3)Sections 271N to 271Z of the 1995 Act apply to proceedings in cases where the trial or hearing begins on or after the day on which this section comes into force.

(4)Nothing in this section or sections 271N to 271Z of the 1995 Act affects the power of a court under any rule of law to make an order for securing that the identity of a witness in a trial or hearing in criminal proceedings is withheld from the accused (or, on a defence application, from other accused), where the trial or hearing begins before the day on which this section comes into force.

(5)Schedule 5 makes provision about certain appeals.

91Television link evidenceS

(1)The 1995 Act is amended as follows.

(2)In section 273 (television link evidence from abroad), in subsection (1), for “solemn” substitute “ criminal ”.

(3)After that section insert—

Evidence from other parts of the United KingdomS

273ATelevision link evidence from other parts of the United Kingdom

(1)In any criminal proceedings in the High Court or the sheriff court a person other than the accused may give evidence through a live television link if—

(a)the witness is within the United Kingdom but outside Scotland,

(b)an application under this section for the issue of a letter of request has been granted, and

(c)the court is satisfied as to the arrangements for the giving of evidence in that manner by that witness.

(2)The prosecutor or the defence in any proceedings referred to in subsection (1) may apply for the issue of a letter of request.

(3)The application must be made to a judge of the court in which the trial is to take place or, if that court is not yet known, to a judge of the High Court.

(4)The judge may, on an application under this section, issue a letter to a court or tribunal exercising jurisdiction in the place where the witness is ordinarily resident requesting assistance in facilitating the giving of evidence by that witness through a live television link, if the judge is satisfied of the matters set out in subsection (5).

(5)Those matters are—

(a)that the evidence which it is averred the witness is able to give is necessary for the proper adjudication of the trial,

(b)that the granting of the application—

(i)is in the interests of justice, and

(ii)in the case of an application by the prosecutor, is not unfair to the accused..

92European evidence warrantsS

(1)The Scottish Ministers may by order make provision for the purposes of and in connection with implementing any obligations of the United Kingdom created by or arising under the Framework Decision (so far as they have effect in or as regards Scotland).

(2)The provision may, in particular, confer functions—

(a)on the Scottish Ministers,

(b)on the Lord Advocate,

(c)on other persons.

(3)An order under subsection (1) may modify any enactment.

(4)An order under subsection (1) may contain provision creating offences and a person who commits such an offence is liable to such penalties, not exceeding those mentioned in subsection (5), as are provided for in the order.

(5)Those penalties are—

(a)on conviction on indictment, imprisonment for a period not exceeding 2 years, or a fine, or both,

(b)on summary conviction, imprisonment for a period not exceeding 12 months, or a fine not exceeding the statutory maximum, or both.

(6)In this section, the “Framework Decision” means Council Framework Decision 2008/978/JHA of 18 December 2008 on the European evidence warrant for the purpose of obtaining objects, documents and data for use in proceedings in criminal matters.

PART 5 SCRIMINAL JUSTICE

Jury serviceS

93Lists of jurorsS

(1)The 1995 Act is amended as follows.

(2)In section 84 (juries: returns of jurors and preparation of lists)—

(a)in subsection (3), for “list” substitute “ lists ”,

(b)for subsection (4) substitute—

(4)For the purpose of a trial in the sheriff court, the sheriff principal must furnish the clerk of court with a list of names, containing the number of persons required, from lists of potential jurors of—

(a)the sheriff court district in which the trial is to be held (the “local district”), and

(b)if the sheriff principal considers it appropriate, any other sheriff court district or districts in the sheriffdom in which the trial is to be held (“other districts”).

(4A)Where the sheriff principal furnishes a list containing names of potential jurors of other districts, the sheriff principal may determine the proportion as between the local district and the other districts in which jurors are to be summoned.,

(c)in subsection (5), for “list”, in both places where it occurs, substitute “ lists ”, and

(d)subsection (7) is repealed.

(3)In section 85(4) (juries: citation and attendance of jurors)—

(a)for the words from the beginning to “shall”, in the first place where it occurs, substitute The sheriff clerk of—

(a)the sheriffdom in which the High Court is to sit, or

(b)the sheriff court district in which a trial in the sheriff court is to be held,

shall , and

(b)the word “such”, in the first place where it occurs, is repealed.

94Upper age limit for jurorsS

(1)Section 1 of the Law Reform (Miscellaneous Provisions) (Scotland) Act 1980 (c.55) (qualification of jurors) is amended as follows.

(2)In subsection (1)—

(a)in paragraph (b), at beginning insert “ subject to subsection (1A), ”, and

(b)the words “, civil or criminal” are repealed.

(3)After subsection (1) insert—

(1A)In relation to criminal proceedings, a person is qualified and liable to serve as a juror despite being over 65 years of age..

95Excusal from jury serviceS

(1)The Law Reform (Miscellaneous Provisions) (Scotland) Act 1980 is amended as follows.

(2)In section 1 (qualification of jurors)—

(a)in subsection (1), after “below” insert “ and to section 1A ”,

(b)in subsection (2), after “service” in the second place where it occurs insert “ in relation to civil proceedings ”,

(c)in subsection (3), after “service” in the first place where it occurs insert “ in relation to civil proceedings ”,

(d)in subsection (5), after “above” insert “ or under section 1A ”, and

(e)in subsection (6), after paragraph (a) insert—

(aa)section 1A;.

(3)After section 1 insert—

1AExcusal of jurors in relation to criminal proceedings

(1)Subject to subsection (3), a person who is qualified under section 1(1) but is among the persons listed in Part III of Schedule 1 to this Act (being persons excusable as of right from jury service) is to be excused from jury service in relation to criminal proceedings on any occasion where the person—

(a)has been required to provide information under section 3(2) of the Jurors (Scotland) Act 1825 (c.22); and

(b)gives written notice to the sheriff principal that the person wishes to be excused, before the end of the period of 7 days beginning with the day on which the person receives the requirement.

(2)Without prejudice to subsection (1), a person who is qualified under section 1(1) but is among the persons listed in Group C of Part III of Schedule 1 to this Act is to be excused from jury service in relation to criminal proceedings on any occasion where—

(a)the person has been required to provide information under section 3(2) of the Jurors (Scotland) Act 1825; and

(b)the person's commanding officer certifies to the sheriff principal that it would be prejudicial to the efficiency of the force of which the person is a member were the person required to be absent from duty.

(3)Subsection (1) does not apply to a person who is qualified under section 1(1) but is among the persons listed in paragraph (a)(iii) of Group F of Part III of Schedule 1 to this Act (persons who have attained the age of 71), but instead such a person is to be excused from jury service in relation to criminal proceedings on any occasion where—

(a)in the case of a person who has been required to provide information under section 3(2) of the Jurors (Scotland) Act 1825, the person gives written notice to the sheriff principal that the person wishes to be excused; or

(b)in the case of a person who has been cited to attend for jury service, the person—

(i)gives written notice to the clerk of court issuing the citation that the person wishes to be excused, before the date on which the person is cited first to attend; or

(ii)attends in compliance with the citation and intimates to the court that the person wishes to be excused..

(4)In section 3(1)(a) (offences in connection with jury service), after “been” insert “ required to provide information under section 3(2) of the Jurors (Scotland) Act 1825 or ”.

96Persons excusable from jury serviceS

In the Law Reform (Miscellaneous Provisions) (Scotland) Act 1980 (c.55), in Schedule 1 (ineligibility for and disqualification and excusal from jury service), Part 3, Group F, for paragraph (a) substitute—

(a)where citation for jury service would result in a person's serving as a juror in relation to criminal proceedings—

(i)persons who have served as a juror in the period of 5 years ending with the date on which the person is cited first to attend;

(ii)persons who have attended for jury service in relation to criminal proceedings, but have not served as a juror, in the period of 2 years ending with the date on which the person is cited first to attend; and

(iii)persons who have attained the age of 71;

(aa)where citation for jury service would result in a person's serving as a juror in relation to civil proceedings, persons who have served, or duly attended for service, as a juror in the period of 5 years ending with the date on which the person is cited first to attend;.

Data matching for detection of fraud etc.S

97Data matching for detection of fraud etc.S

(1)The Public Finance and Accountability (Scotland) Act 2000 (asp 1) is amended as follows.

(2)In section 11 (Audit Scotland: financial provisions)—

(a)after subsection (1)(c) insert—

(ca)carrying out a data matching exercise under section 26A,, and

(b)after subsection (5) insert—

(5A)Charges under subsection (1)(ca) may be imposed on (either or both)—

(a)persons who disclose data for a data matching exercise,

(b)persons who receive the results of such an exercise..

(3)After section 26 insert—

PART 2A SDATA MATCHING
26APower to carry out data matching exercises

(1)Audit Scotland may carry out data matching exercises or arrange for them to be carried out on its behalf.

(2)A data matching exercise is an exercise involving the comparison of sets of data to determine how far they match (including the identification of any patterns and trends).

(3)The power in subsection (1) may be exercised for one or more of the following purposes—

(a)assisting in the prevention and detection of fraud,

(b)assisting in the prevention and detection of crime (other than fraud),

(c)assisting in the apprehension and prosecution of offenders.

(4)A data matching exercise may not be used for the sole purpose of identifying patterns and trends in a person's characteristics or behaviour which suggest the person is likely to commit fraud in the future.

26BVoluntary disclosure of data to Audit Scotland

(1)For the purposes of a data matching exercise, any person may disclose data to Audit Scotland (or a person acting on its behalf).

(2)Such disclosure does not breach—

(a)any duty of confidentiality owed by the person making the disclosure, or

(b)any other restriction on the disclosure of data.

(3)Nothing in this section authorises a disclosure—

(a)which contravenes the Data Protection Act 1998 (c.29),

(b)which is prohibited by Part 1 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (c.23) (interception, acquisition and disclosure of communications data), or

(c)of data comprising or including patient data.

(4)Patient data” means data relating to an individual which is held for medical purposes and from which the individual can be identified.

(5)“Medical purposes” are the purposes of—

(a)preventative medicine,

(b)medical diagnosis,

(c)medical research,

(d)the provision of care and treatment,

(e)the management of health and social care services, and

(f)informing individuals about their physical or mental health or condition, the diagnosis of their condition or their care and treatment.

(6)Nothing in this section prevents disclosure of data under any other provision of this Act, another enactment or any rule of law.

(7)Data matching exercises may include data disclosed by a person outside Scotland.

26CPower to require disclosure of data

(1)Audit Scotland may require the persons mentioned in subsection (2) to disclose to it (or a person acting on its behalf) such data as it (or the person acting on its behalf) may reasonably require for the purpose of carrying out data matching exercises in such form as it (or such person) may so require.

(2)Those persons are—

(a)a body or an office holder any of whose accounts is an account in relation to which sections 21 and 22 apply,

(b)a body whose accounts must be audited under Part 7 of the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (c.65) (finance),

(c)a Licensing Board continued in existence by or established under section 5 of the Licensing (Scotland) Act 2005 (asp 16), or

(d)an officer or a member of a body, office holder or board mentioned in paragraph (a), (b) or (c).

(3)Audit Scotland must not require a person to disclose data if—

(a)the disclosure would contravene the Data Protection Act 1998 (c.29),

(b)the disclosure is prohibited by Part 1 of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (c.23) (interception, acquisition and disclosure of communications data).

(4)A disclosure made in response to a requirement imposed under subsection (1) does not breach—

(a)any duty of confidentiality owed by the person making the disclosure, or

(b)any other restriction on the disclosure of data.

(5)A person mentioned in subsection (2) who without reasonable excuse fails to comply with a requirement made in accordance with this section is guilty of an offence and liable on summary conviction to a fine not exceeding level 3 on the standard scale.

26DDisclosure of results of data matching

(1)This section applies to the following data—

(a)data relating to a particular person obtained by or on behalf of Audit Scotland for the purpose of carrying out a data matching exercise, and

(b)the results of such an exercise.

(2)Data to which this section applies may be disclosed by or on behalf of Audit Scotland if the disclosure is—

(a)for, or in connection with, a purpose for which a data matching exercise is carried out,

(b)to a Scottish audit agency, or a related party, for, or in connection with a function of that audit agency under—

(i)Part 2 of this Act, or

(ii)Part 7 of the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (c.65) (finance),

(c)to a United Kingdom audit agency, or a related party, for, or in connection with, a function of that audit agency corresponding or similar to—

(i)the functions of a Scottish audit agency, or

(ii)the functions of Audit Scotland under this Part, or

(d)in pursuance of a duty imposed by or under an enactment.

(3)“Scottish audit agency”, for the purpose of subsections (2)(b) and (c)(i), means—

(a)the Auditor General, or

(b)the Accounts Commission.

(4)“United Kingdom audit agency”, for the purposes of subsection (2)(c), means—

(a)the National Audit Office,

(b)the Audit Commission for Local Authorities and the National Health Service in England,

(c)the Auditor General for Wales,

(d)the Comptroller and Auditor General for Northern Ireland, or

(e)a person designated as a local government auditor under article 4 of the Local Government (Northern Ireland) Order 2005 (S.I. 2005/1968 (NI.18)).

(5)Related party”, in relation to a Scottish or United Kingdom audit agency means—

(a)a person acting on its behalf,

(b)a body or office holder whose accounts are required to be audited by it or by a person appointed by it, or

(c)a person appointed by it to audit those accounts.

(6)If the data used for a data matching exercise includes patient data—

(a)subsection (2)(a) applies only so far as the purpose for which the disclosure is made relates to a relevant NHS body, and

(b)subsection (2)(b) or (c) applies only so far as the function for, or in connection with, which the disclosure is made relates to such a body.

(7)In subsection (6)—

  • patient data” has the same meaning as section 26B(4), and

  • relevant NHS body” means—

    (a)

    an NHS body as defined in section 22(1) of the Community Care and Health (Scotland) Act 2002 (asp 5),

    (b)

    a health service body as defined in section 53(1) of the Audit Commission Act 1998 (c.18),

    (c)

    a Welsh NHS body as defined in section 60 of the Public Audit (Wales) Act 2004 (c.23),

    (d)

    a

(8)Data disclosed under subsection (2) may not be further disclosed except—

(a)for, or in connection with—

(i)the purpose for which it was disclosed under subsection (2)(a), or

(ii)the function for which it was disclosed under subsection (2)(b) or (c),

(b)otherwise for the investigation or prosecution of an offence, or

(c)in pursuance of a duty imposed by or under an enactment.

(9)Except as authorised by subsections (2) and (8), a person who discloses data to which this section applies is guilty of an offence and liable—

(a)on summary conviction, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding 12 months, to a fine or to both, or

(b)on conviction on indictment, to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, to a fine or to both.

26EPublication of reports on data matching

(1)Audit Scotland may publish a report on a data matching exercise (including a report on the results of an exercise).

(2)Such a report must not include data relating to a particular person if—

(a)the person is the subject of any data included in the data matching exercise,

(b)the person can be identified from the data, and

(c)the data is not otherwise in the public domain.

(3)A report published under subsection (1) is to be published in such manner as Audit Scotland considers appropriate for the purposes of bringing it to the attention of those members of the public who may be interested.

(4)Nothing in section 26D prevents publication under this section.

(5)This section does not affect any powers of an auditor where the data matching exercise in question forms part of an audit under—

(a)Part 2 of this Act, or

(b)Part 7 of the Local Government (Scotland) Act 1973 (c.65) (finance).

26FData matching code of practice

(1)Audit Scotland must prepare, and keep under review, a code of practice with respect to data matching exercises.

(2)Regard must be had to the code in carrying out and participating in any such exercise.

(3)Audit Scotland must consult the following persons before preparing or altering the code of practice—

(a)the Information Commissioner,

(b)the persons mentioned in section 26C(2), and

(c)any other person Audit Scotland thinks fit.

(4)Audit Scotland must, from time to time, publish the code.

26GPowers of the Scottish Ministers

(1)The Scottish Ministers may by order amend this Part—

(a)to add a public body to the persons mentioned in section 26C(2),

(b)to modify the application of this Part in relation to a public body so added, or

(c)to remove a person from the persons mentioned in section 26C(2).

(2)An order under this section may include such incidental, consequential, supplementary or transitional provision as the Scottish Ministers think fit.

(3)In this section, “public body” means a person whose functions—

(a)are functions of a public nature, or

(b)include functions of a public nature.

(4)A person referred to in subsection (3)(b) is a public body to the extent only of the functions referred to in that subsection..

Sharing information with anti-fraud organisationsS

98Sharing information with anti-fraud organisationsS

In the Serious Crime Act 2007 (c.27), the following provisions are repealed—

(a)in section 68 (disclosure of information to prevent fraud), subsections (5) and (6),

(b)in section 69 (offence for certain further disclosures of information), subsection (3), and

(c)in section 71 (code of practice for disclosure of information to prevent fraud)—

(i)subsection (4), and

(ii)in subsection (6), the definition of “relevant public authority”.

Closure of premises associated with human exploitation etc.S

99Closure of premises associated with human exploitation etc.S

(1)In section 26 of the Antisocial Behaviour etc. (Scotland) Act 2004 (asp 8) (authorisation of closure notice)—

(a)in subsection (1), for “and (3)” substitute “ to (3B) ”,

(b)in subsection (3), after “may” insert “ , in a case involving antisocial behaviour, ”, and

(c)after subsection (3) insert—

(3A)A senior police officer may, in a case involving an exploitation offence, authorise the service of a closure notice only where the senior police officer—

(a)has reasonable grounds for believing that—

(i)such an offence is being (or, at any time in the immediately preceding 3 months, was) committed in the premises, or

(ii)the premises are being (or, at any time in the immediately preceding 3 months, have been) used for or in connection with the commission of such an offence, and

(b)is satisfied that—

(i)the local authority for the area in which the premises are situated has been consulted, and

(ii)reasonable steps have been taken to establish the identity of any person who lives on, has control of, has responsibility for or has an interest in the premises.

(3B)Subsection (3A) is without prejudice to subsection (3) (including in so far as subsection (3) is applicable in relation to a brothel or other place where prostitution may occur)..

(2)In section 27 of that Act (service etc.), in subsection (2)—

(a)in paragraph (b)(i), after “section 26(3)(b)(ii)” insert “ or (as the case may be) (3A)(b)(ii) ”, and

(b)in paragraph (b)(ii), for “in that subsection” substitute “ there ”.

(3)In section 30 of that Act (application: determination)—

(a)in subsection (1), after “subsection (2)” insert “ or (2A) ”,

(b)in subsection (2), for “Those” substitute “ Where the application is in a case involving antisocial behaviour, the ”,

(c)after subsection (2) insert—

(2A)Where the application is in a case involving an exploitation offence, the conditions are—

(a)that it appears that—

(i)such an offence is being (or was recently) committed in the premises, or

(ii)the premises continue to be (or recently have been) used for or in connection with the commission of such an offence, and

(b)that the making of the order is necessary to prevent the commission of such an offence for the period specified in the order.,

(d)in subsection (3)(b), for the words from “engaged” to the end substitute (as the case may be)—

(i)engaged in antisocial behaviour which has occurred in the premises, or

(ii)involved in the commission of an exploitation offence in or connected with the premises., and

(e)after subsection (3) insert—

(3A)For the purpose of paragraph (b)(ii) of subsection (3), a person such as is mentioned in paragraph (a) of that subsection is not involved in the commission of an exploitation offence where that person is the victim of the offence..

(4)In section 32 of that Act (extension)—

(a)after subsection (1) insert—

(1A)The sheriff may, on the application of a senior police officer and if satisfied that it is necessary to do so to prevent the commission of an exploitation offence, make an order extending the period for which a closure order has effect for a period not exceeding the maximum period.,

(b)in subsection (2), for “subsection (1)” substitute “ subsections (1) and (1A) ”,

(c)in subsection (3)—

(i)after “may” insert “ , in a case involving antisocial behaviour, ”, and

(ii)for “this section” substitute “ subsection (1) ”, and

(d)after subsection (3) insert—

(3A)A senior police officer may, in a case involving an exploitation offence, make an application under subsection (1A) only if—

(a)it is made while the closure order has effect, and

(b)the senior police officer—

(i)has reasonable grounds for believing that it is necessary to extend the period for which the closure order has effect for the purpose of preventing the commission of an exploitation offence, and

(ii)is satisfied that the appropriate local authority has been consulted about the intention to make the application..

(5)In section 33 of that Act (revocation), in subsection (1), for the words from “the occurrence” to the end substitute (as the case may be)—

(a)the occurrence of relevant harm, or

(b)the commission of an exploitation offence,

revoke the order. .

(6)In section 36 of that Act (appeals), in subsection (5), after “section 32(1)” insert “ or (1A) ”.

(7)After section 40 of that Act insert—

40AExploitation offences

(1)In this Part, an “exploitation offence” is any of the following offences—

(a)so far as concerning travel or identity documentation for enabling the trafficking of people (including passports, visas and work permits)—

(i)fraud, or

(ii)uttering a forged document,

(b)so far as concerning the trafficking of people, an offence under section 26(1)(d) of the Immigration Act 1971 (c.77) (falsification of documentation),

(c)an offence under section 52 or 52A of the Civic Government (Scotland) Act 1982 (c.45) (possession, taking or distribution of indecent images of children),

(d)an offence under sections 7 to 12 or 13(9) of the Criminal Law (Consolidation) (Scotland) Act 1995 (c.39) (offences relating to prostitution and brothels),

(e)an offence under section 22 of the Criminal Justice (Scotland) Act 2003 (asp 7) (traffic in prostitution etc.),

(f)an offence under section 1 of the Protection of Children and Prevention of Sexual Offences (Scotland) Act 2005 (asp 9) (meeting a child following certain preliminary contact),

(g)an offence under sections 9 to 12 of that Act (offences relating to provision by child of sexual services or child pornography),

(h)an offence under section 4 of the Asylum and Immigration (Treatment of Claimants, etc.) Act 2004 (c.19) (trafficking people for exploitation),

(i)an offence under Part 1 of the Sexual Offences (Scotland) Act 2009 (asp 9) (rape etc.),

(j)an offence under Part 4 of that Act (sexual offences involving children) other than an offence under section 37 (older children engaging in sexual conduct with each other),

(k)an offence under section 42 of that Act (sexual abuse of trust),

(l)an offence under section 46 of that Act (sexual abuse of trust of a mentally disordered person),

(m)an offence under section 47 (slavery, servitude and forced or compulsory labour) of the Criminal Justice and Licensing (Scotland) Act 2010 (asp 13).

(2)For the purposes of subsection (1)(a) and (b), a reference to trafficking of people is a reference to a person intentionally doing something in respect of at least one other person which involves the commission of an offence mentioned in subsection (1)(e) or (h).

(3)For the purposes of subsection (1), a reference to an offence includes a reference to—

(a)an attempt to commit an offence,

(b)incitement to commit an offence,

(c)counselling or procuring the commission of an offence,

(d)involvement art and part in an offence, and

(e)an offence as modified by section 54 of the Sexual Offences (Scotland) Act 2009 (asp 9) (incitement to commit certain sexual acts outside the United Kingdom).

(4)The Scottish Ministers may by order add to or otherwise modify the specification of offences listed in subsection (1)..

Sexual offences prevention ordersS

100Sexual offences prevention ordersS

(1)In section 141 of the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act 2008 (c.4) (sexual offences prevention orders: relevant sexual offences), subsection (2) is repealed.

(2)In the Sexual Offences Act 2003 (c.42)—

(a)in section 106 (applications and grounds for sexual offences prevention orders: supplemental), in subsection (13), the words from “in their” to the end are repealed,

(b)in section 109 (interim SOPOs), in subsection (5), for “107(3)” substitute “ 107(2) ”,

(c)after section 111 insert—

111ASOPO and interim SOPO requirements: Scotland

(1)This section applies in relation to a sexual offences prevention order or an interim sexual offences prevention order made, or to be made, by a court in Scotland.

(2)Such an order, in addition to or instead of prohibiting the defendant from doing anything described in the order, may require the defendant to do anything described in the order.

(3)Accordingly, in relation to such an order—

(a)the references in sections 107(2) and 108(5) to a prohibition include a reference to a requirement, and

(b)the reference in section 113(1) to a person's doing anything which he is prohibited from doing includes a reference to his failing to do anything which he is required to do., and

(d)in section 112 (provisions relating to sexual offences prevention orders in Scotland), in subsection (1), after paragraph (d) insert—

(da)a court may make an order under section 104(1)—

(i)at its own instance, or

(ii)on the motion of the prosecutor;.

Foreign travel ordersS

101Foreign travel ordersS

(1)The Sexual Offences Act 2003 (c.42) is amended as follows.

(2)In section 115 (definition of “protecting children generally or any child from serious sexual harm from the defendant outside the United Kingdom”), in subsection (2), for “16” in both places it occurs substitute “ 18 ”.

(3)In section 116 (qualifying offenders: offences), in subsection (2)(d), for “16” substitute “ 18 ”.

(4)In section 117(1) (foreign travel orders: effect), for “6 months” substitute “ 5 years ”.

(5)Before section 118, insert—

117BSurrender of passports: Scotland

(1)This section applies in relation to a foreign travel order which contains a prohibition within section 117(2)(c).

(2)The order must require the person in respect of whom the order has effect to surrender all of the person's passports, at a police station in Scotland specified in the order—

(a)on or before the date when the prohibition takes effect, or

(b)within a period specified in the order.

(3)Any passports surrendered must be returned as soon as reasonably practicable after the person ceases to be subject to a foreign travel order containing a prohibition within section 117(2)(c).

(4)Subsection (3) does not apply in relation to—

(a)a passport issued by or on behalf of the authorities of a country outside the United Kingdom if the passport has been returned to those authorities;

(b)a passport issued by or on behalf of an international organisation if the passport has been returned to that organisation.

(5)In this section “passport” means—

(a)a United Kingdom passport within the meaning of the Immigration Act 1971 (c.77);

(b)a passport issued by or on behalf of the authorities of a country outside the United Kingdom, or by or on behalf of an international organisation;

(c)a document that can be used (in some or all circumstances) instead of a passport..

(6)In section 122 (breach of foreign travel order), before subsection (2) insert—

(1B)A person commits an offence if, without reasonable excuse, the person fails to comply with—

(a)a requirement under section 117A(2) (surrender of passports: England and Wales and Northern Ireland), or

(b)a requirement under section 117B(2) (surrender of passports: Scotland).

(1C)A person may be prosecuted, tried and punished for any offence under subsection (1B)—

(a)in any sheriff court district in which the person is apprehended or is in custody, or

(b)in such sheriff court district as the Lord Advocate may determine,

as if the offence had been committed in that district (and the offence is, for all purposes incidental to or consequential on the trial or punishment, to be deemed to have been committed in that district)..

Sex offender notification requirementsS

102Sex offender notification requirementsS

(1)The Sexual Offences Act 2003 (c.42) is amended as follows.

(2)In section 85 (notification requirements: periodic notification)—

(a)in subsection (1), for “period of one year” substitute “ applicable period ”,

(b)in subsection (3), for “period referred to in subsection (1)” substitute “ applicable period ”, and

(c)after subsection (4) insert—

(5)In this section, the “applicable period” means—

(a)in any case where subsection (6) applies to the relevant offender, such period not exceeding one year as the Scottish Ministers may prescribe in regulations, and

(b)in any other case, the period of one year.

(6)This subsection applies to the relevant offender if the last home address notified by the offender under section 83(1) or 84(1) or subsection (1) was the address or location of such a place as is mentioned in section 83(7)(b)..

(3)In section 86 (notification requirements: travel outside the United Kingdom), subsection (4) is repealed.

(4)In section 87 (method of notification and related matters), subsection (6) is repealed.

(5)In section 96 (information about release or transfer), subsection (4) is repealed.

(6)In section 138 (orders and regulations)—

(a)in subsection (2), after “84,” insert “ 85, ”, and

(b)after subsection (3) insert—

(4)Orders or regulations made by the Scottish Ministers under this Act may—

(a)make different provision for different purposes,

(b)include supplementary, incidental, consequential, transitional, transitory or saving provisions..

Risk of sexual harm ordersS

103Risk of sexual harm ordersS

(1)The Protection of Children and Prevention of Sexual Offences (Scotland) Act 2005 (asp 9) is amended as follows.

(2)In section 2 (risk of sexual harm orders: applications, grounds and effect)—

(a)in subsection (7)(a), after “doing” insert “ , or requires that person to do, ”, and

(b)in subsection (8), after “prohibitions” insert “ or requirements ”.

(3)In section 4 (risk of sexual harm orders: variations, renewals and discharges), in subsection (4), after “prohibitions” in both places where it occurs insert “ or requirements ”.

(4)In section 5 (interim risk of sexual harm orders), in subsection (3), after “doing” insert “ , or requiring that person to do, ”.

(5)In section 7 (offence: breach of risk of sexual harm order or interim risk of sexual harm order), in subsection (1), after “doing” insert “ , or fails to do anything which the person is required to do, ”.

104Risk of sexual harm orders: spent convictionsS

In section 7 of the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (c.53) (limitations on rehabilitation under the Act), in subsection (2), after paragraph (bb) insert—

(bc)in any proceedings on an application under section 2, 4 or 5 of the Protection of Children and Prevention of Sexual Offences (Scotland) Act 2005 (asp 9) or in any appeal under section 6 of that Act;.

Obtaining information from outwith United KingdomS

105Obtaining information from outwith United KingdomS

After section 194I of the 1995 Act insert—

194IAPower to request assistance in obtaining information abroad

(1)Where it appears to the Commission that there may be information which they require for the purposes of carrying out their functions, and the information is outside the United Kingdom, they may apply to the High Court to request assistance.

(2)On an application made by the Commission under subsection (1), the High Court may request assistance if satisfied that it is reasonable in the circumstances.

(3)In this section, “request assistance” means request assistance in obtaining outside the United Kingdom any information specified in the request for use by the Commission for the purposes of carrying out their functions.

(4)Section 8 of the Crime (International Co-operation) Act 2003 (c.32) (sending requests for assistance) applies to requests for assistance under this section as it applies to requests for assistance under section 7 of that Act.

(5)Subsections (2), (3) and (6) of section 9 of that Act (use of evidence obtained) apply to information obtained pursuant to a request for assistance under this section as they apply under subsection (1) of that section to evidence obtained pursuant to a request for assistance under section 7 of that Act..

SurveillanceS

106Grant of authorisations for surveillanceS

(1)The Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Scotland) Act 2000 (asp 11) is amended as follows.

(2)In section 10 (authorisation of intrusive surveillance)—

(a)in subsection (1), for the words from “the” where it second occurs to the end substitute “ any of the persons mentioned in subsection (1A) may grant authorisations for the carrying out of intrusive surveillance. ”, and

(b)after that subsection insert—

(1A)Those persons are—

(a)the chief constable of every police force,

(b)the Director General of the Scottish Crime and Drug Enforcement Agency,

(c)the Deputy Director General of the Scottish Crime and Drug Enforcement Agency..

(3)After that section insert—

10AAuthorisation of surveillance: joint surveillance operations

In the case of a joint surveillance operation, where authorisation is sought for the carrying out of any form of conduct to which this Act applies, authorisation may be granted by any one of the persons having power to grant authorisation for the carrying out of that conduct..

(4)In section 11 (rules for grant of authorisations), in subsection (3), after “General” insert “ or the Deputy Director General ”.